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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2000

1-20 of 28 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


8 Acting Techniques (and the Stars Who Swear by Them)

26 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Anyone who’s been to an acting class knows that there are as many approaches to the craft as there are actors approaching it. Though all actors must develop their own understanding of the work, several master teachers have led the way in training since the turn of the 20th Century. These well-known gurus helped develop acting as we know it, and continue to grow some of the industry’s most respected stars.  Stanislavski’s SystemOne of the greatest acting teachers of all time, Constantin Stanislavski’s work signaled a shift in 20th century acting and inspired a whole new generation of techniques and teachers. In addition to changing the face of acting worldwide, Stanislavski’s Moscow Art Theatre was at the forefront of the naturalistic theater movement in the Soviet Union and in Europe. His approach incorporates spiritual realism, emotional memory, dramatic and self-analysis, and disciplined practice. Lord Laurence Olivier »

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Horror Director Philip Marshak Dies at 80

7 August 2014 3:01 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Philip Marshak, a director known for his work on numerous horror and X-rated films of the 1970s and ‘80s, died Thursday, July 24 in Los Angeles after a battle with diabetes and leukemia. He was 80.

Born in the Bronx, NY, Marshak worked as an electrician with his father after serving in the Navy during the Korean War. He grew to be a striving entrepreneur, operating numerous small businesses throughout his life. Marshak opened one of the first gay bars in Los Angeles, Georgie Girl.

He studied acting at the Lee Strasberg Theatre in New York before moving to Los Angeles with his wife, Pamela, to work towards his dream of being a filmmaker. He would create his first short film, “Reuben’s Revenge,” while attending film school in Los Angeles. His first feature film, “Potluck,” was shot guerilla-style in New York without permits.

Marshak would go on to direct several low-budget »

- Sebastian Torrelio

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R.I.P. Director Philip Marshak

28 July 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Philip Marshak, who wrote and directed several cult classic films in the late ’70s and ’80s, including Night Train To Terror, Cataclysm and Dracula Sucks, has died. He passed away last night surrounded by his family at his Los Angeles home after a long battle with leukemia, diabetes and heart disease. his son, talent manager Darryl Marshak said. He was 80. Philip Marshak began his Hollywood career as an actor studying with Lee Strasberg, but then took a turn as an underground/guerrilla filmmaker in the late 60’s/70’s. Raising indie funds, Marshak wrote, produced & directed several low budget cult classics. […] »

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10 Overly Committed Actors Who Took Their Parts Way Too Seriously

19 July 2014 12:51 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Warner Bros.

Acting isn’t as easy as some might think – it takes years of training, dedication and talent to make it to the top, and you only have to turn on the television during the daytime and watch a few soaps to realise just how terrible some acting really is.

Different actors take different approaches to getting into character and embodying the roles – some use the classical acting model of Stanislavski, using bodily and vocal expression in conjunction with imagination and improvisation, while others prefer the more hardcore method acting approach, drawing upon a range of techniques which immerse them fully in the character, a variation and expansion of Stanislavski’s approach adapted by Lee Strasberg for American actors.

While often the results are awe-inspiring performances in which the actor seems to literally embody the character they’re portraying, the cost for such authenticity can sometimes be high, placing »

- Andrew Dilks

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Director Paul Mazursky Dies

2 July 2014 5:30 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Paul Mazursky, the innovative and versatile director who showed the absurdity of modern life in such movies as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and An Unmarried Woman, has died. He was 84. The filmmaker died of pulmonary cardiac arrest Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said Mazursky's spokeswoman Nancy Willen. As a talented writer, actor, producer and director, Mazursky racked up five Oscar nominations, mostly for writing such films as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and Enemies, A Love Story. He also created memorable roles for the likes of Art Carney, Jill Clayburgh and Natalie Wood. Later in life, Mazursky acted »

- Associated Press

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Director Paul Mazursky Dies

2 July 2014 5:30 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Paul Mazursky, the innovative and versatile director who showed the absurdity of modern life in such movies as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and An Unmarried Woman, has died. He was 84. The filmmaker died of pulmonary cardiac arrest Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said Mazursky's spokeswoman Nancy Willen. As a talented writer, actor, producer and director, Mazursky racked up five Oscar nominations, mostly for writing such films as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and Enemies, A Love Story. He also created memorable roles for the likes of Art Carney, Jill Clayburgh and Natalie Wood. Later in life, Mazursky acted »

- Associated Press

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Role Playing: A conversation with actor Branko Tomovic

1 July 2014 11:10 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg chats with Branko Tomovic about what attracted him to acting, Blue Velvet, Fury and portraying a historical figure he idolises…

“My parents came as immigrants to Germany from Serbia, so working meant having a job that pays the bills,” remarks Branko Tomovic who has appeared in The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), Inbetween (2008) and Believe the Magic (2012).   “I have been interested in art and films ever since I was a child but doing anything artistic as a job wasn’t really heard of. I can’t really blame them as every parent wants a secure life for their child.  It wasn’t that my parents were not supportive but more that they didn’t know any differently.  I have always been the black sheep in the family with everything that I did, so it was cool with me and have always done with my life what I thought was right.”  Tomovic attended an acclaimed acting school. »

- Trevor Hogg

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Paul Mazursky, Director of ‘Unmarried Woman,’ Dies at 84

1 July 2014 11:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Performer-turned-writer/director Paul Mazursky, who was Oscar-nommed five times and helmed hit movies including “Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice” and “An Unmarried Woman,” has died. He was 84. Mazursky died of cardiac arrest Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

While his most significant films as a director came several decades ago, he returned to acting on TV in later years, playing Norm on “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and appearing on “The Sopranos” and on ABC drama “Once and Again” as Sela Ward’s father.

Mazursky at his best captured the spirit of the late ’60s and the ’70s, when the American moral climate was turned on its head. His films entertainingly explored such weighty issues as marital fidelity, the merits of psychological therapy and modern divorce: “Bob and Ted,” starring Robert Culp and Natalie Wood as a “liberated” married couple; “Blume in Love,” starring George Segal and Susan Anspach »

- Richard Natale

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Eli Wallach, Whose Career Spanned Six Decades, Dies at 98 (Video Highlights)

25 June 2014 8:39 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Eli Wallach, the veteran actor of screen and stage, died Wednesday at age 98.  Best known in the film world for his debut starring role in Elia Kazan's "Baby Doll" and as the sinister villain Tuco in Sergio Leone's "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," Wallach's career spanned more than 60 years, garnering him a Tony, an Emmy and many adoring fans. Born in 1915, Wallach was raised in Brooklyn and attended the University of Texas at Austin, later returning to New York for a master's degree in education so he could become a teacher like his three siblings.  Instead, he ended up studying acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse until he was drafted into the army during World War II.  In 1948, after he returned home, he became one of the core 20 members who founded the Actors Studio, where he studied with Lee Strasberg alongside Kazan, Cheryl Crawford, Marlon Brando and others. »

- Jacob Combs

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'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly' Legend Eli Wallach Has Died at 98

25 June 2014 8:26 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Hollywood has lost another legend after being graced with a 60-year career and nearly 100 years on this Earth as The New York Times reports legendary actor Eli Wallach, star of the classic spaghetti western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, has passed away at 98. After a stint in the army during WWII, serving five years in the Medical Corps and rising to captain, Wallach returned home to become a founding member of the Actors Studio and studied method acting with Lee Strasberg. That led to a Broadway debut in 1951, and stage time with wife Anne Jackson in plays like The Typists, The Tiger and The Diary of Anne Frank. Wallach found plenty of acclaim on the stage with a role in Tennessee Williams’s The Rose Tattoo, for which he won a Tony Award. After that, Williams gave Wallach his first film role in Baby Doll, an adaptation of »

- Ethan Anderton

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Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

24 June 2014 10:07 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Eli Wallach, ‘The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’ Star, Dies at 98

24 June 2014 10:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Eli Wallach 1915-2014

24 June 2014 12:48 PM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

It takes a certain type of talent to flourish in character roles. Some actors just seem to come alive when they’re handed meaty people to play, full of dark ambition or crazy schemes. One such actor was Eli Wallach, probably best known for his iconic villain Tuco in The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, who died on Tuesday at the age of 98.Born in Brooklyn to Polish Jewish immigrants, he studied at the University of Texas at Austin and there learned to ride, a skill that would serve him well later in his career. Originally planning to become a teacher like his siblings, he switched to acting before being drafted in World War II. After five years in the Medical Corps, he returned to civilian life and studied performing with a vengeance, going on to become a founder member of the Actors Studios and learning from Lee Strasberg. »

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Joanna, 90 Days triumph at Ps Shortfest

23 June 2014 11:54 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Yatao Li’s Chinese entry Carry On won the Best Of Festival Award, while Aneta Kopacz’s Joanna from Poland prevailed in the Greater Palm Springs Convention & Visitors Bureau Grand Jury Award.

Timothy Yeung’s 90 Days took the Panavision Best North American Short honours.

The festival ran from June 17-23 and screened 330 films from more than 3,000 submissions. Organisers handed out more than $115,000 in prizes, including $21,000 in cash awards, in 21 categories. 

“The 2014 Palm Springs ShortFest far surpassed all of our expectations,” said festival director Kathleen McInnis (pictured at the Australian reception). “Our audience, filmmaker and industry attendance all soared, as did the striking talent we were able to showcase during our 20th anniversary year.

“Well over 800 filmmaker and industry guests made our Filmmaker Forums one of the most dynamic we have ever had, and most of the screenings had all filmmakers in attendance — a great bonus for our audience who love their Q&A sessions. Filmmakers brought »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Interview: Lou Volpe Talks Jersey Boys

18 June 2014 12:09 PM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

Bravely stepping outside your comfort zone to explore a job and lifestyle you’re truly passionate about can be a terrifying experience at first. But once you truly commit to fulfilling your dream and succeeding in the area you truly wish to professionally pursue, the opportunities to show your talent can be endless. Actor Lou Volpe, who emigrated to Los Angeles as a young adult, courageously returned to acting after raising his family. After starting his career in theater in Italy, and enrolling at the Lee Strasberg Theater and Film Institute in Los Angeles to further his skills, he landed roles in films and TV shows, and also directed the movies,  [ Read More ]

The post Interview: Lou Volpe Talks Jersey Boys appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Karen Benardello

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2nd Annual Israel Film Center Festival: Patrick Stewart, Cranes, and Surviving the Holocaust

11 June 2014 11:31 AM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

Thanks to Manhattan’s favorite cultural philanthropist, Carole Zabar  -- you know her rugelach -- a second year of the Israel Film Center Festival will be unspooling at various venues around the city, but mainly at The Jewish Community Center on the Upper West Side from June 12th through June 19th.

A highlight of the fest is Yael Reuveny’s engrossing three-generation exploration of her family’s post-Holocaust existence, Farewell, Herr Schwarz, a paean to those trying to come to terms with the past.

Michla Schwarz, Yael’s grandmother, was the lone member of her family to survive the Holocaust, or so she thought. Immigrating to Israel, she married, raised a family, and died emotionally scarred with an unyielding hatred for everything German. Her daughter Etty, who remembered her mother screaming at night and being emotionally distant, is also enveloped in this decades-old enmity.

But one day just before Michla’s death, »

- Brandon Judell

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AFI Honoree Jane Fonda Draws Strength From Engagement

4 June 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Given Jane Fonda’s hard-earned stature as an actress, activist, author and self-help guru, she’s amazingly humble and grounded in the moment. There’s no calcified nostalgia for the past. Sentences don’t begin with “In my day…” There are no unfavorable comparisons between today’s conglomerated entertainment landscape and Hollywood’s second Golden Era in the ’70s, when she earned Oscars for “Klute” and “Coming Home.”

Instead of citing the icons of her generation and those previous, she’s generous in her praise of younger peers. On Meryl Streep: “She has raised the bar so high that it throws the gauntlet at our feet.” When asked who the equivalents of Costa-Gavras and Stanley Kramer are today, she points to Clooney, Damon and Affleck: “These young and big movie stars also direct and produce movies that are very, very relevant politically and socially.”

Even the relatively green Adam Driver, »

- Steve Chagollan

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Angelina Jolie Facts: 33 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the 'Maleficent' Star

30 May 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's hard to believe Angelina Jolie has been a fixture of Hollywood for almost 20 years now.

Ever since breaking out in the late '90s with a string of critically-acclaimed performances, the actress quickly established herself as an international star. Between headlining hits like "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" and directing passion projects like "In the Land of Blood and Honey," Jolie is perhaps the biggest Hollywood spokesperson of humanitarian efforts worldwide. This summer, however, Jolie can be seen taking a wicked turn in Disney's "Maleficent" -- a re-imagining of "Sleeping Beauty" from the villain's point-of-view.

From her Oscar-winning godfather to her curiosity with blood, here are 33 things you probably don't know about Angelina Jolie.

1. Jolie was born June 4, 1975 in Los Angeles to Jon Voight and Marcheline Bertrand, both actors.

2. The actress was born Angelina Jolie Voight, but she legally dropped her surname "Voight" in 2002.

3. She is the goddaughter of actress Jacqueline Bisset and actor Maximilian Schell. »

- Jonny Black

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Film Review: ‘The M Word’

2 May 2014 3:43 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Menopause may well be a universal condition, but the brand of narcissistic self-examination on display in Henry Jaglom’s “The M Word” is distinctly Southern Californian. One might even say it’s Jaglomian, given the iconoclastic writer-director’s prior forays into such delicate distaff issues as body image (“Eating”), pregnancy (“Babyfever”) and compulsive shopping (“Going Shopping”). For his 19th self-financed and –distributed feature, Jaglom toys little with his formula of actorly improvisations and a plot that allows for maximum use of his sprawling Santa Monica home (plus maximum exposure for ingenue du jour Tanna Frederick). The lively but wildly erratic result will surely please Jaglom’s winnowing fan base, while baffling most others and doing little to deter Jaglom himself, who already has movie number 20 in the can.

Jaglom, who started out as an ancillary member of Bob Rafelson’s Bbs Productions group (where he directed his one and only studio-backed feature, »

- Scott Foundas

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Sally Field to Receive a Star on the Walk of Fame

1 May 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sally field’s come a long way, baby. She began as TV’s “Gidget” (1965-66). So convinced she wasn’t going to get the part, Field attended the audition with her beach bag so she could go swimming afterward. She was Gidget even before she got the role.

Field’s trademark — and her Achilles heel — has always been her likeability. In Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” Field, 67, created the unlikeable Mary Todd Lincoln opposite Daniel Day-Lewis. Field’s “Molly” is a hot mess in a corset, a belle with a brain whose ambition has dragged Abraham Lincoln all the way to the White House.

And, yet, while I was troubled by the reverential stance in Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” I pined for the alternate, nothing-but-loose-corset-stays-and-raw-emotions movie that Field appeared to be starring in, and for which she earned an Oscar nomination.

Field, who is getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of »

- Thelma Adams

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2000

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