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Jessica Redenbach joins Matchbox's Hide and Seek as director’s attachment

Jessica Redenbach.

Jessica Redenbach will serve as the director.s attachment on Matchbox's.Hide and Seek..

Redenbach will work with director David Caesar, who is directing two episodes..

"I.m so grateful to the Australian Directors Guild, Screen Australia, Matchbox Pictures and of course to David Caesar for this exciting opportunity", Redenbach said..

"The chance to work with a filmmaker of David.s calibre is just thrilling. I.m appreciative that such opportunities exist and offer my sincere thanks to everyone who makes the Directors Attachment Scheme possible."

Redenbach has form as a screenwriter (Spirited, Rush), as well as a writer/director, with her latest short Tender premiering in the International Competition at Clermont-Ferrand Film Festival and winning the Australian Directors Guild Award for Best Short Film.

Hide and Seek is the story of a routine murder investigation that leads to the uncovering of an international network of identity fraud.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Lucy Gaffy wins director's attachment on Cjz drama Bond

  • IF.com.au
Emerging Australian director Lucy Gaffy has been selected as the director's attachment on upcoming Cjz TV drama Bond.

Gaffy, who has directed shorts including Dream Baby, The Gift, The Fence and The Love Song of Iskra Prufrock, will be attached to feature film and TV drama director Mark Joffe on Bond, which is currently in pre-production..

The industry incentive program is funded by Screen Australia and managed by the Adg for emerging directors to develop their craft.

Gaffy said she was excited to work with a filmmaker like Mark Joffe, "a storyteller whom I have so long admired - and deeply grateful to Kingston, Franky and all the marvellous team at the Adg for their continued support of emerging directors."

Gaffy is a Masters graduate of the Australian Film Television and Radio School (Aftrs)..

She has been working in the industry for over seven years across a broad range of productions including short films,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Aftrs unveils emerging film talent at 2015 graduation

The Australian Film Television and Radio School has unleashed a new crop of talent on the industry with the 2015 Graduation Ceremony. . .

A highlight of the ceremony was the awarding of the Aftrs. Honorary Degree (Doctor of Arts) to broadcaster, commentator and filmmaker Phillip Adams.

Adams played a key role in the revival of the Australian film industry in the 1970s. .

He was the author of a 1969 report that led to legislation by Prime Minister Gorton in 1970 for an Australian Film and Television Development Corporation (later the Australian Film Commission) and the Experimental Film Fund as well as the eventual creation of an Australian national film School (now Aftrs). Phillip was one of the original members of council for the interim School.

The Dressmaker producer Sue Maslin present the degree. .

Maslin is a graduate of the Aftrs Masters of Screen Arts & Business degree.

Graduates include Imogen Banks, one of the producers
See full article at IF.com.au »

Nora Niasari wins Secret City director's attachment

  • IF.com.au
Nora Niasari has been named as an attachment to Emma Freeman on the Matchbox Pictures TV series Secret City for Foxtel.

The attachment forms part of an industry incentive program funded by Screen Australia and managed by the Australian Director's Guild for emerging directors.

Niasari said she was thrilled and honoured to be chosen for an attachment on such a successful production..

"This is perfect timing and a perfect opportunity to move into directing for television,. she said.

Nora Niasari started directing several years ago after graduating with a Master of Film and Television from the Victorian College of the Arts with a number of very successful short films, including her most recent The Phoenix, which was nominated for the Adg Best Direction in a Student Film in 2015 and was selected for over a dozen national and international film festivals..

She has also been selected for the 2015 Melbourne International Film Festival.s Accelerator Program.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Director attached to Love Child

The Australian Directors Guild, Screen Australia and Playmaker Media today announced Julietta Boscolo as the director.s attachment to Geoff Bennett on the Nine Network's Love Child, now in production.

A Vca graduate, Boscolo started directing several years ago. with a number of short films including Sam.s Gold, which won the Adg Best Direction in a Short Film last year and was invited to more than a dozen national and international festivals.

She was one of nine filmmakers worldwide selected for the Binger Filmlab Directors Lab in Amsterdam in 2013. Julietta said, .I'm absolutely thrilled and honoured to be chosen for this attachment on such a successful production. This is perfect timing and a perfect opportunity to move into directing for television.. Screen Australia.s Senior Development Executive Nerida Moore said, .Screen Australia recognises the importance of ongoing talent development opportunities, and is proud to support this through the Director.s Attachment Scheme.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Mayhem 2014: ‘Predestination’ Review

Stars: Ethan Hawke, Noah Taylor, Sarah Snook, Elise Jansen, Christopher Kirby, Madeleine West, Cate Wolfe, Jim Knobeloch, Freya Stafford, Lucinda Armstrong Hall, Rob Jenkins, Christopher Stollery | Written by Michael Spierig, Peter Spierig | Directed by The Spierig Brothers

Back in 2003, the Spierig Brothers directed a low budget farmhouse zombie horror called Undead. It was an entertaining and imaginative debut, and everyone looked forward to their next offering. It turned out we had to wait a while. In 2009, they released Daybreakers. Another imaginative genre offering, with an entertaining cast and some neat ideas. What would their next movie be?

After another long wait, we arrive in 2014 with Predestination.

Shown as the opening film for day four of the festival, Predestination is a difficult film to talk about without totally ruining it. So I’ll give you this much: after a tense opening sequence which introduces us to the film’s antagonist the
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Predestination (2014) International Movie Trailer 2: Looper Meets Cloud Atlas

  • Film-Book
Predestination International Trailer 2. Michael Spierig‘s Predestination (2014) international movie trailer 2 stars Lucinda Armstrong Hall, Rob Jenkins, Tyler Coppin, Ben Prendergast, and Christopher Stollery. Predestination‘s plot synopsis: “Predestination chronicles the life of a Temporal Agent (Ethan Hawke) sent on an intricate series of time-travel journeys designed to ensure the [...]

Continue reading: Predestination (2014) International Movie Trailer 2: Looper Meets Cloud Atlas
See full article at Film-Book »

Homebake Cinema Pavilion returns

Home grown short films are on display as well as music at the Homebake Festival with the Homebake Cinema Pavilion.

Award-winning short films have been selected to screen alongside musical acts Grinderman, The Triffids, Cut Copy and Gotye and Icehouse performing Flowers.

Filmmaker Kieran Darcy-Smith has made the selection.

Expect early short films by filmmakers David Michod (Animal Kingdom), Glendyn Ivin (Last Ride, Offspring), Nash Edgerton (The Square), Gregor Jordan (Two Hands), Warwick Thornton (Samson and Delilah) and Greg McLean (Wolf Creek).

Darcy-Smith told Encore: “I’ve found short films from filmmakers who have gone on to do much better things, as a way of providing inspiration. They might be ten years old but you can see the creative signature.”

“I also try and uncover films that I think are indicative of a great team of filmmakers, people who I think should be encouraged to do more.”

As a result,
See full article at Encore Magazine »

Winners of the 2011 Palm Springs International ShortFest!

The Palm Springs International ShortFest, billed as the largest short film festival in North America, has announced its Festival award winners! 331 short films were screened, but in the end, only 18 categories were awarded.

I love and totally support the Palm Springs International ShortFest, many winners move on to nab an Oscar! According to Festival Director, Darry Macdonald, "It.s been a remarkable year for ShortFest, with record attendance and a rapturous response to the programming by audiences, industry and filmmakers alike. The Film Market and industry programs were particulary active, adding hugely to the Festival.s success. I.m confident a number of major future filmmakers emerged here this year and will go on to enliven the feature film world."

And the winners of the 2011 Palm Springs International ShortFest are:

Jury Awards

Best Of Festival Award - $2,000 cash and Software Package courtesy of The Showbiz Café & Store; Ultimate Stock Footage
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Palm Springs ShortFest Announces Winners

As definite favorites emerged from an incredibly strong selection of shorts, the winning list well-represented the demographics of the overall line-up. From 32 Australian short films in the festival, a few were sure to rise to the top – Elizabeth Tadic’s “Umoja: No Men Allowed” receiving the Grand Jury Award (while Christopher Stollery’s very funny “dik” was by far the most recommended film in the marketplace); and, with many well-known directors, there were always going to be some that ascended (Terry George – writer/director of “Hotel Rwanda” and “Reservation Road” – picked up $500 for his second place effort).

For the full list of winners, see below.

Jury Awards

Best Of Festival Award - The winner of this award is eligible to submit their film to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for Oscar consideration.

Bahiya & Mahmoud (Jordan/USA), Zaid Abu Hamdan

Aging couple Bahiya and Mahmoud have fallen into
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

Palm Springs ShortFest Announces Winners

As definite favorites emerged from an incredibly strong selection of shorts, the winning list well-represented the demographics of the overall line-up. From 32 Australian short films in the festival, a few were sure to rise to the top – Elizabeth Tadic’s “Umoja: No Men Allowed” receiving the Grand Jury Award (while Christopher Stollery’s very funny “dik” was by far the most recommended film in the marketplace); and, with many well-known directors, there were always going to be some that ascended (Terry George – writer/director of “Hotel Rwanda” and “Reservation Road” – picked up $500 for his second place effort).

For the full list of winners, see below.

Jury Awards

Best Of Festival Award - The winner of this award is eligible to submit their film to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for Oscar consideration.

Bahiya & Mahmoud (Jordan/USA), Zaid Abu Hamdan

Aging couple Bahiya and Mahmoud have fallen into
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

French short ¿Dónde Está Kim Basinger? wins Flickerfest

Edouard Deluc’s short ¿Dónde Está Kim Basinger? has won the Flickerfest Award for Best Short Film.

The Best Australian Film went to Andrew Ruhemann and Shaun Taun’s The Lost Thing, while the Jury Prize was awarded to the British short Baby, by Daniel Mulloy.

The 20th edition of Flickerfest Short Film Festival came to an end last night at Bondi Pavilion, Sydney. The best films from the festival will now embark on a 30-stop national tour, starting in Byron Bay on January 21 and traveling through to March.

The winners – selected by a Jury consisting of Kryzystof Geirat (Director Krakow Film Festival), Eileen Arandiga (Festival Director of the Worldwide Short Film Festival in Toronto,) Renee Brack (face of Movie Extra), Hannah Hillard (director), Susie Porter (actress), Luke Doolan (director), Peta Watermayer (National Geographic Channel’s Program and Acquisitions Manager) and Tom Zubrycki (director) – are:

National Geographic Award – Best Documentary
See full article at Encore Magazine »

The Rage in Placid Lake

The Rage in Placid Lake
AFI Fest

Singer-songwriter Ben Lee is the title character in "The Rage in Placid Lake", a precocious oddball who, in a misguided attempt to fit in and make his life easier, decides to go straight. Taking satiric aim at a familiar target, conformity, Australian playwright Tony McNamara's film debut is by turns incisive and broad. Polished and dark but upbeat, the less-than-satisfying comedy from Showtime Australia had its North American premiere as a competition title at the AFI Fest.

Placid is raised in upper-middle-class suburbia by impossibly self-absorbed New Age parents (Miranda Richardson and Garry McDonald) who are blind to the beatings he endures for being different. A high school graduation-night confrontation with his usual tormentors leaves Placid in traction, every bone in his body broken. Once recovered, he embarks on a new way of life, cutting his hair, donning suit and tie and promptly getting himself hired at Icarus Insurance, much to the horror of his free-spirit folks. Increasingly troubled by his new direction is lifelong friend Gemma (Rose Byrne), a science whiz who's as smart as Placid but has always played by the rules.

Loosely based on one of McNamara's stage works, the film has a striking widescreen look on a budget, its stylized interiors especially effective in the blank surfaces of the Icarus offices. The workplace goings-on are an absurdist version of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." Under the wing of his unhappy boss (Christopher Stollery), Placid rises to the Fast Track program, where ambitious Jane (Saskia Smit) believes in supply-room quickies to relieve tension. Claire Danes cameos as an admiring colleague.

McNamara doesn't seem quite sure about where he's going once he's made his points, so he makes them repeatedly, especially regarding the horridly wishy-washy Lakes, thankless characters that are nonetheless well played by Richardson and McDonald. In his film debut, Lee is a believably charming cad. But despite his and Byrne's likable performances, their characters' latent romance never quite matters in the way it's intended.

The Rage in Placid Lake

The Rage in Placid Lake
AFI Fest

Singer-songwriter Ben Lee is the title character in "The Rage in Placid Lake", a precocious oddball who, in a misguided attempt to fit in and make his life easier, decides to go straight. Taking satiric aim at a familiar target, conformity, Australian playwright Tony McNamara's film debut is by turns incisive and broad. Polished and dark but upbeat, the less-than-satisfying comedy from Showtime Australia had its North American premiere as a competition title at the AFI Fest.

Placid is raised in upper-middle-class suburbia by impossibly self-absorbed New Age parents (Miranda Richardson and Garry McDonald) who are blind to the beatings he endures for being different. A high school graduation-night confrontation with his usual tormentors leaves Placid in traction, every bone in his body broken. Once recovered, he embarks on a new way of life, cutting his hair, donning suit and tie and promptly getting himself hired at Icarus Insurance, much to the horror of his free-spirit folks. Increasingly troubled by his new direction is lifelong friend Gemma (Rose Byrne), a science whiz who's as smart as Placid but has always played by the rules.

Loosely based on one of McNamara's stage works, the film has a striking widescreen look on a budget, its stylized interiors especially effective in the blank surfaces of the Icarus offices. The workplace goings-on are an absurdist version of "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." Under the wing of his unhappy boss (Christopher Stollery), Placid rises to the Fast Track program, where ambitious Jane (Saskia Smit) believes in supply-room quickies to relieve tension. Claire Danes cameos as an admiring colleague.

McNamara doesn't seem quite sure about where he's going once he's made his points, so he makes them repeatedly, especially regarding the horridly wishy-washy Lakes, thankless characters that are nonetheless well played by Richardson and McDonald. In his film debut, Lee is a believably charming cad. But despite his and Byrne's likable performances, their characters' latent romance never quite matters in the way it's intended.

See also

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