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Win John Carpenter’s ‘Assault On Precinct 13’ on Blu-ray

Hitting Blu-ray on Monday 9th January across the UK is John Carpenter‘s classic Assault On Precinct 13, and we have two copies of the new release to give away.

The Blu-ray is packed full of brand new special features including the early John Carpenter student short Captain Voyeur and the documentary Do You Remember Laurie Zimmer.

An La gang’s revenge-fuelled killing spree leads them to a half-abandoned police station in the throes of closing down. Under siege with power and phone lines cut, lone cop Ethan Bishop (Austin Stoker ­– Battle for the Planet of the Apes), and his skeleton staff, including two secretaries (Laurie Zimmer – A Dirty Story and Nancy LoomisHalloween), recruit a condemned killer from the cells in a desperate battle to survive the night. As the gang close in the tension escalates to boiling point in this brutal and unrelenting cult classic.

To be in with a chance of winning,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Assault on Precinct 13: 40th Anniversary Limited Edition’ Review

Stars: Austin Stoker, Darwin Joston, Laurie Zimmer, Martin West, Tony Burton, Charles Cyphers, Nancy Kyes, John J. Fox, Henry Brandon, Kim Richards, Frank Doubleday | Written and Directed by John Carpenter

I class myself as a John Carpenter fan, but the fact that I’d not seen Assault on Precinct 13 bugged me. Now thankfully with the Second Sight release of Assault on Precinct 13: 40th Anniversary Limited Edition on Blu-ray, I finally got to fix that.

When police sergeant Ethan Bishop (Austin) is given the job of holding the fort at a closing La precinct office on New Year’s Eve he hopes the night will go smoothly. When a man turns up in shock, chased by a group of gang members though, it seems things will hardly go smoothly.

The premise for Assault on Precinct 13 isn’t a unique one, in fact director John Carpenter even mentions
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review – Assault on Precinct 13: 40th Anniversary Edition

Assault on Precinct 13, 1976.

Directed by John Carpenter.

Starring Austin Stoker, Darwin Joston, Laurie Zimmer, Charles Cyphers, Tony Burton, Nancy Loomis, Martin West.

Synopsis:

A cop and a ragtag collection of criminals defend a closing police station against an invading gang.

Often lauded as ‘the ultimate siege move’, John Carpenter’s second full-length feature Assault on Precinct 13 is 40 years old this month and has been given an HD makeover by Second Sight Films in a rather splendid special edition Blu-ray (and DVD) set. With Carpenter back in the headlines as he is currently touring the UK performing the themes from his movies, what better time for a reissue of one of his often overlooked early works?

Perhaps the reason for this film being considered as ‘the ultimate…’ is in its simplicity. Lieutenant Ethan Bishop (Austin Stoker – Sheba, Baby) is sent to a closing-down police station to cover for the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Sheba, Baby | Blu-ray Review

  • ioncinema
Strangely enough, Pam Grier’s last Blaxploitation feature, 1975’s Sheba, Baby, would be the title to introduce her to a much wider audience thanks to its PG rating. Though undoubtedly adult in theme, it’s a kittenish exercise compared to the violence, gratuitous sex, and shameless taken-for-granted racist and misogynistic antics of earlier efforts. Its classification as the final chapter of Grier’s Blaxploitation days is also sort of a misnomer, since this refers to the last time she’d don her famous persona as an action star in pursuit of a more serious career, heading into Drum (a sequel to the infamous Mandingo), starring opposite Richard Pryor in Greased Lightning, and even a Ray Bradbury adaptation in Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983). But 1975 was one of several sterling years for Grier, headlining three films, though none of them would eventually reach the same iconicity as the prior year’s
See full article at ioncinema »

Abby (1974) Review

  • MoreHorror
Reviewed by Kevin Scott, MoreHorror.com

Abby (1974)

Director: William Girdler

Writers: William Girdler and Gordon Cornell Layne

Cast: William Marshall (Bishop Garnet Williams), Terry Carter (Rev. Emmett Williams), Austin Stoker (Det. Cass Potter), Carol Speed (Abby Williams), Juanita Moore (Miranda “Momma” Potter)

I pride myself on being a Blaxploitation fan, but I may have missed one of the high points in the genre. A good friend of mine and a trusted resource for solid film recommendations told me about this one. When I elaborate a little further about the cast and the plot, I almost need to turn in my Blaxploitation fan card. It’s almost unpardonable.

Abby” came out in 1974. It’s a story of possession that debuted a year after another possession story that maybe you heard of. It actually was taken out of circulation for several years because Warner Brothers sued American International Pictures for directly ripping off “The Exorcist”. Maybe,
See full article at MoreHorror »

Scream Factory to Live Stream John Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13 Tonight

  • DailyDead
For some, summer’s approach brings fond memories of nights spent at the drive-in, chewing popcorn, hanging out with friends and dates, and watching thrillers, horror flicks and the talking candy bar ads that played in-between them on the big screen. While the golden age of the drive-in is in the rearview mirror, Scream Factory is throwing their own tribute to the drive-in days and you can experience it from your couch.

To celebrate the beginning of their Summer of Fear, Scream Factory is kicking off their Summer of Fear Drive-In by playing a live stream screening of John Carpenter’s classic 1976 film, Assault on Precinct 13, tonight at 7pm Pt/10pm Est on www.summeroffear.com and on their YouTube channel. Fans of the film should be pleased to hear that a new, exclusive interview with Carpenter about Assault on Precinct 13 will be played during the webcast, and
See full article at DailyDead »

Review: Assault on Precinct 13 (Blu-ray)

  • DailyDead
A simple story of a street gang terrorizing a soon-to-be abandoned police station while the inhabitants within fight for their lives, Assault on Precinct 13 is surprisingly touching and a great example of Carpenter’s economy as a filmmaker, as the film is lean and packs quite a punch. While the plot sounds flimsy, it’s Carpenter’s care for his characters, creating real people we care about, in extraordinary circumstances that make it work on so many levels rather than becoming a mindless action film.

Officer Bishop (Austin Stoker) has been assigned to watch the titular precinct for the evening until it can be officially closed down and emptied out the next day. For one night of terror, along with a couple of convicts en route to another facility (Martin West and Tony Burton) and the precinct’s remaining staff (Nancy Loomis and Laurie Zimmer), Bishop and the others
See full article at DailyDead »

New on Video: John Carpenter’s ‘Assault on Precinct 13′

  • SoundOnSight
Assault on Precinct 13

Written and directed by John Carpenter

USA, 1976

With his filmmaking career beginning in the midst of the new Hollywood and its touchstones in American film history, it’s perhaps easy to see why the work of John Carpenter has been somewhat overshadowed by more celebrated filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, or Francis Ford Coppola. He found a niche in the horror genre with the landmark Halloween, and he proceeded to make one idiosyncratic, wholly original, and generally skillful film after another. Some were rather uneven, particularly in recent years, but for every Memoirs of an Invisible Man, there has been The Fog, Escape from New York, The Thing, or They Live. Carpenter’s list of credits boasts some exceptional work — inventive, daring, visually, and technically creative — but amongst these titles, one film stands out as a favorite of many cinephiles in general and Carpenter fans in particular.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Prep for the Assault on Precinct 13 Blu-ray Release by Counting Down the Top 10 John Carpenter Films

The title "Master of Horror" is thrown around quite a bit. Often it’s warranted but sometimes not so much. In the case of filmmaker John Carpenter, however, you cannot heap enough accolades upon him.

Although he is one of the forerunners of the modern slasher sub-genre of horror, Carpenter’s credits go far beyond that. He is not only a true master of horror, but an incredibly diverse and talented filmmaker.

In honor of Scream Factory's November 19th Collector’s Edition Blu-ray/DVD combo pack release of Assault on Precinct 13, we thought we'd sort through his impressive body of work and give you our Top 10 John Carpenter Films.

From celebrating Halloween in Haddonfield to escaping from New York and experiencing big trouble in China, Carpenter’s films are as diverse as they are entertaining. With honorable mentions to his first movie, Dark Star; the enchanting Starman; and anthology
See full article at Dread Central »

Watch the Original Trailer for John Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13

  • DailyDead
Scream Factory will be releasing John Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13 as a Collector’s Edition Blu-ray later this month and we have a look at the original trailer:

“Isolated and cut off from the city inside a soon-to-be-closed L.A. police station, a group of police officers and convicts must join forces to defend themselves against the gang called Street Thunder, who have taken a blood oath to kill someone trapped inside the precinct.

From John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing and Prince Of Darkness), Assault On Precinct 13 combines the elements of a classic western and a modern thriller to create a riveting cult classic.”

Assault on Precinct 13 was written and directed by John Carpenter, and stars Austin Stoker, Darwin Joston, Laurie Zimmer, and Nancy Kyes. Here’s what’s included in the collector’s edition release:

Audio Commentary with writer/director John Carpenter New Audio Commentary
See full article at DailyDead »

Listen to Alan Howarth Play the Escape from New York Theme & Part of the Halloween II Score Here!

Beyond Fest came to the American Cinematheque in Los Angeles last night, kicking off with a 35mm print screening of John Carpenter's Assault on Precinct 13.

Death Waltz Records made it out from the UK to co-host the event, sell some records and provide the first 100 attendees with copies of the Assault score on cassette.  Later in the evening, star Austin Stoker came out to discuss the film and composer Alan Howarth took the stage...to play live.

Accompanied by trippy, altered versions of John Carpenter's films to set the mood, Howarth had the theater lights dimmed as he played tracks from Halloween III: Season of the Witch, Escape from New York, Halloween II, Big Trouble in Little China and more.

We were there, naturally, and we shot some video of Howarth playing the Escape theme and a track from Halloween II.

Read more...
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

John Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13 Blu-ray Release Details and Cover Art

  • DailyDead
On November 19th, we’ll see the release of John Carpenter’s Assault on Precinct 13 to Blu-ray and Scream Factor has provided us with the final list of bonus features.

“Isolated and cut off from the city inside a soon-to-be-closed L.A. police station, a group of police officers and convicts must join forces to defend themselves against the gang called Street Thunder, who have taken a blood oath to kill someone trapped inside the precinct.

From John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing and Prince Of Darkness), Assault On Precinct 13 combines the elements of a classic western and a modern thriller to create a riveting cult classic.

A Ckk Production “Assault On Precinct 13

Starring Austin Stoker

Darwin Joston, Laurie Zimmer

Executive Producer Joseph Kaufman

Produced by J.S. Kaplan

Written and Directed by John Carpenter

Bonus Features:

Audio Commentary with writer/director John Carpenter New Audio Commentary with Art
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Foxy Brown’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Pam Grier, Antonio Fargas, Peter Brown, Terry Carter, Sid Haig, Juanita Brown, Harry Holcombe | Written and Directed by Jack Hill

With Shaft hitting it big in the cinema in 1971, grabbing an audience spanning both age and race, producers scrambled to find the next big blaxploitation franchise and star. In walked Jack Hill with his 1973 effort Coffy. Starring Pam Grier as a vigilante nurse, the film was a runaway hit for American-International Pictures who commissioned Hill to come up with a follow-up. Originally conceived as a sequel to Coffy, Aip decided at the last minute it did not want to do a sequel and thus Foxy Brown was born…

Foxy Brown stars Pam Grier as the street-smart yet intensely sexy titular character, whose undercover-agent boyfriend is gunned down on the orders of evil drug kingpins. Racked with grief and anger she stops at nothing to exact a thrillingly brutal revenge.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Motel Hell, Black Sabbath & More Getting The Arrow Video Treatment!

UK based cult video label Arrow Video is know for their lavish deluxe edition releases, and their upcoming Spring slate of Blu-ray and DVDs is no exception! The smorgasbord of titles, which range from sexploitation, to exploitation, and everything in between!) include Blu-ray debuts of Jack Hill’s blaxploitation epic Foxy Brown and his black & white horror trip Spider Baby! Two Mario Bava films are also receiving an HD upgrade, the Boris Karloff starring Black Sabbath and Baron Blood! Brian De Palma’s Blow Out is hitting Blu (available stateside here from the illustrious Criterion Collection), but of extreme note is the surprise announcement of MGM’s batshit cannibal horror/comedy hybrid Motel Hell finally making it’s bow onto the format! For you lovers of George A. Romero’s non-horror output, his medieval motorbike epic Knightriders is on it’s way as well. Even the italian lover of ass
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Supporting Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated (part 2 of 5)

Oliver Reed as Athos in The Three Musketeers & The Four Musketeers (Richard Lester, 1973/1974, UK):

These films were actually shot all at once but ultimately released as two separate films telling one long story. As the musketeer with a dark past, Oliver Reed provides a lot of the heart and soul in these very entertaining and well-made films. Technically, since we have to isolate one film for our fantasy nomination, it would be The Four Musketeers as his role is more prominent in that film. Reed’s reunion scene with Faye Dunaway’s Milady is superb as is Reed’s intense swordplay with an array of opponents including Christopher Lee. An underrated actor whose career was damaged by well-documented alcohol problems and notorious off-screen behavior, Reed still logged in some truly incredible acting performances over the course of his career. His portrayal of Athos is definitely one of them.

Other
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Gallery: Mondo’s Los Angeles Mystery Movie Series Recap Including Posters

  • Slash Film
Gallery: Mondo’s Los Angeles Mystery Movie Series Recap Including Posters
There's something incredibly exciting about the phrase "anything is possible." Waiting for something that could be anything is an exercise for your imagination. That infinite possibility, coupled with wild speculation and prediction, is ninety percent of the fun of Mondo's Mystery Movies. Mondo, as you may know, is the ever-growing poster boutique associated with the Alamo Drafthouse. In April Mondo began a project called Mystery Movies. People buy a ticket for a movie that won't be announced until they're in the theater. That is coupled with a limited edition poster that will only ever be available at the event. So imagine buying a ticket to one of these things and speculating what it could be. You throw out suggestions with your fellow attendees, laughing at wild ones and nodding at more likely ones. Finally, you sit down for the film and all is revealed. Does it live up to your expectations?
See full article at Slash Film »

A "Planet of the Apes" primer

  • IFC
A
This Friday sees the release of the first "Planet of the Apes" film in a decade, "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" starring James Franco. We'll have our review of the film up on Friday, but to help set the mood, here is a revised and updated version of a feature we first brought you in 2008 on the 40th anniversary of the original "Planet of the Apes." Below you'll find a guide to all six previous movies, with synopses, spoilers, continuity errors, and a celebration of all the high-minded social commentary and low-brow schlocky ape masks that make the "Apes" films one of the most satisfying of all sci-fi franchises.

Please note: Most "Planet of the Apes" films have a "shocking" twist that everyone at this point already knows. However, if you have somehow extricated yourself from forty years of pop culture references, by all means be wary of Spoilers ahead.
See full article at IFC »

Flashback To 1976 – “Assault On Precinct 13″ (The Original Version) And Austin Stoker

Watched Assault On Precinct 13 again earlier today for the first time… the original John Carpenter-directed version, released in 1976, not the 2005 remake which co-starred Laurence Fishburne.

A taut, little thriller that I’m always rather impressed with, especially given the tiny budget, even for its day. It was made for just $100,000 in 1976 money, which, even when adjust for inflation to reflect recent dollars, still only comes to about $400,000! Compare that to the inferior 2005 remake, which cost $20 Million!

Not that the remake was terrible; it was actually a decent take, and I mostly was entertained by it; but I found the original much more concise and restrained, and thus realistic, than the Hollywood-ized remake which, while enjoyable, felt less believable.

One big difference between the original and the remake is that, the individual races of the two main characters (the police officer and the prisoner) are switched in both films; specifically,
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Code Red Returning to Horror High and Terminal Island

The great folks at Code Red DVD are at it once again digging up hard-to-find blasts from the past to give the digital treatment to. Two of the latest drive-in favorites getting the special edition treatment via Code Red are the el cheapo 1974 cult fave Horror High (Aka Twisted Brain) and the 1973 survival thriller Terminal Island.

First out of the gate on August 10th will be a brand new 16x9 (1.85:1) print of Horror High mastered from HiDef from the original 35mm dupe negatives from Crown International's vault. This marks the first time the film has ever been released uncut on home video.

A series of grisly murders wreaks havoc at a small Texas high school! A no-nonsense cop is assigned to find out the identity of the mad devious killer who roams the corridors of the high school. A mild mannered student has been drinking a mysterious potion that turns himself into Vernon,
See full article at Dread Central »

Flashback With “Assault On Precinct 13″ (1976 Version) And Austin Stoker

Watched Assault On Precinct 13 earlier today for the first time… the original John Carpenter-directed version, released in 1976, not the 2005 remake which co-starred Laurence Fishburne.

A taut, little thriller that I was rather impressed with, especially given the tiny budget, even for its day. It was made for just $100,000 in 1976 money, which, even when adjust for inflation to reflect 2009 dollars, still only comes to about $400,000! Compare that to the inferior 2005 remake, which cost $20 Million!

Not that the remake was terrible; it was actually a decent take, and I mostly was entertained by it; but I found the original much more concise and controlled, and thus realistic, than the Hollywood-ized remake which, while enjoyable, felt less believable.

One big difference between the original and the remake is that, the individual races of the two main characters (the police officer and the prisoner) are switched in both films; specifically, in the 1976 original,
See full article at ShadowAndAct »
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