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9 items from 2011


10 of the best films set in Edinburgh

13 October 2011 8:51 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Edinburgh on film isn't just Trainspotting it's classics: Chariots of Fire, romance: One Day and thrills: Burke and Hare. Here are 10, picked by Andrew Pulver, film editor of the Guardian

• As featured in our Edinburgh city guide

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Ronald Neame, 1969

Muriel Spark's celebrated 1961 novella was, until Trainspotting, Edinburgh's most readily identifiable contribution to modern literature. Inspired largely by Spark's own time at [James] Gillespie's school, this elaborate, empathetic satire on a fascism-admiring teacher would not have been expected to be a major candidate for Oscar attention, but Maggie Smith won the best actress award in 1969, after Ronald "Poseidon Adventure" Neame directed the film version. Sixties Edinburgh has no problem standing in for 30s Edinburgh: the Marcia Blaine school is sited in the Edinburgh Academy building in Henderson Row, while it's possible to stand in the exact same spot as Maggie Smith on the Grassmarket and bellow: "Observe, »

- Andrew Pulver

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The rise and rise of Brontëmania

9 September 2011 4:07 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Brontës are often dismissed as up-market Mills & Boon. But with the release of two films this autumn, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, they look set to rival even Jane Austen in the public's affections

Ours is supposed to be the age of instantaneity, where books can be downloaded in a few seconds and reputations created overnight. But the Victorians could be speedy, too, and there's no more striking example of instant celebrity than Jane Eyre. Charlotte Brontë posted the manuscript to Messrs Smith and Elder on 24 August 1847, two weeks after the publisher had expressed an interest in seeing her new novel while turning down her first. Within a fortnight, a deal had been struck (Charlotte was paid £100) and proofs were being worked on. In the 21st century a first novel can wait two years between acceptance and publication. Jane Eyre was out in eight weeks, on 17 October, with Thackeray »

- Blake Morrison

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John Wood obituary

11 August 2011 3:30 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Ferociously intelligent actor who reigned supreme in Stoppard and Shakespeare

John Wood, who has died aged 81, was one of the greatest stage actors of the past century, especially associated with his roles in the plays of Tom Stoppard. But a combination of his enigmatic privacy and low profile on film – he cropped up a lot without dominating a movie – meant that he remained largely unknown to the wider public.

As with all great actors, you always knew what he was thinking, all the time. Wood was especially striking in the brain-box department. Tall, forbidding and aquiline-featured, he was as much the perfect Sherlock Holmes on stage as he was the ideal Brutus. He exuded ferocious intelligence, and the twinkle in his eye could be as merciless as it was invariably amused.

As the Royal Shakespeare Company's Brutus in Julius Caesar in 1972, he was undoubtedly the noblest Roman of them all, »

- Michael Coveney

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John Wood obituary

10 August 2011 9:06 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Ferociously intelligent actor who reigned supreme in Stoppard and Shakespeare

John Wood, who has died aged 81, was one of the greatest stage actors of the past century, especially associated with his roles in the plays of Tom Stoppard. But a combination of his enigmatic privacy and low profile on film – he cropped up a lot without dominating a movie – meant that he remained largely unknown to the wider public.

As with all great actors, you always knew what he was thinking, all the time. Wood was especially striking in the brain-box department. Tall, forbidding and aquiline-featured, he was as much the perfect Sherlock Holmes on stage as he was the ideal Brutus. He exuded ferocious intelligence, and the twinkle in his eye could be as merciless as it was invariably amused.

As the Royal Shakespeare Company's Brutus in Julius Caesar in 1972, he was undoubtedly the noblest Roman of them all, »

- Michael Coveney

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Ten Films to Watch Now that Harry Potter’s Finished

19 July 2011 11:58 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

After ten years, eight films and countless articles celebrating both, it’s all over. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 has apparated into cinemas, broken records all over the place, and now there’s nothing left to do but watch it over and over and over again. Possibly in 3D.

But when you come out of the coma induced by the sudden realisation that yes, you really are ten years older than you were when The Philosopher’s Stone came out, you may want to watch a different film. Here are some suggestions for ways to plug that Potter-shaped hole in your heart.

(Just in case you are one of the three fans in the world who haven’t seen it yet, there are some Deathly Hallows 2 spoilers below).

The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (dir. Ronald Neame, 1969)

Professor McGonagall has always suffered from never having quite enough screen-time, »

- Juliette Harrisson

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Page and Screen - Are our favourite characters more alive in books or movies?

6 July 2011 11:43 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Liam Trim with the latest edition of 'Page and Screen'...

The idea of character is more complicated than we allow ourselves to realise. Of course put simply they are made up, fictional people in stories. But there are those who wish to challenge such a casual assumption. Some say they are merely bundles of words. Others question their independence, as we can never really know anything certainly about anyone besides ourselves. Therefore are characters simply versions of their creators? Are authors, screenwriters and actors getting it completely wrong when they try to imagine what it’s like to be someone who isn’t them? Should all characters be developed to a certain point? Some crop up as mere extras in a scene of a movie or a chapter of a novel but nevertheless leave an impression on us. Do they count as true characters even when we know next to nothing about them? »

- flickeringmyth

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Anna Massey obituary

6 July 2011 9:48 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Award-winning actor with a fastidious intelligence and a hint of inner steel

Anna Massey, who has died of cancer aged 73, made her name on the stage as a teenager in French-window froth. She then graduated, with effortless and extraordinary ease, to the classics and to the work of Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter and David Hare. In later years, she became best known for her award-winning work in television and film. What constantly impressed was her fastidious intelligence and capacity for stillness: always the mark of a first-rate actor.

Born in Thakeham, West Sussex, she was bred into show business although, in personal terms, that proved something of a mixed blessing. Her father was Raymond Massey, a Canadian actor who achieved success in Hollywood; her mother was Adrianne Allen who had appeared in the original production of Noël Coward's Private Lives. Anna's godfather was the film director John Ford.

Since »

- Michael Billington, Ronald Bergan

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Anna Massey obituary

6 July 2011 9:48 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Award-winning actor with a fastidious intelligence and a hint of inner steel

Anna Massey, who has died of cancer aged 73, made her name on the stage as a teenager in French-window froth. She then graduated, with effortless and extraordinary ease, to the classics and to the work of Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter and David Hare. In later years, she became best known for her award-winning work in television and film. What constantly impressed was her fastidious intelligence and capacity for stillness: always the mark of a first-rate actor.

Born in Thakeham, West Sussex, she was bred into show business although, in personal terms, that proved something of a mixed blessing. Her father was Raymond Massey, a Canadian actor who achieved success in Hollywood; her mother was Adrianne Allen who had appeared in the original production of Noël Coward's Private Lives. Anna's godfather was the film director John Ford.

Since »

- Michael Billington, Ronald Bergan

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Ken Taylor obituary

28 April 2011 4:59 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Screenwriter who created wonderful parts for women, as in his TV adaptation of Paul Scott's The Jewel in the Crown

The screenwriter Ken Taylor, who has died aged 88, had his first radio play broadcast in 1941. Anyone who has enjoyed drama in the intervening 70 years will have been touched by his work for radio, television, film and stage, which included a Bafta-nominated adaptation of Mary Wesley's The Camomile Lawn for Channel 4 (1992), the 1983 BBC version of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, a 1975 adaptation of Muriel Spark's The Girls of Slender Means and the 1964 teleplay The Devil and John Brown, for which he won the Writers' Guild award. Perhaps his biggest success was The Jewel in the Crown, the 1984 Granada television mini-series based upon the Raj Quartet novels by Paul Scott, which earned him an Emmy nomination and the writer of the year award from the Royal Television Society.

I »

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9 items from 2011


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