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1-20 of 86 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Film Feature: The 10 Best Films of 2012, Part Two

27 December 2012 1:47 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Hot on the heels of the wondrous 10 Most Overlooked Films of 2012 and the illustrious first look at The 10 Best Films of 2012 comes “The 10 Best Films of 2012, Part Two,” as rendered by Patrick McDonald of HollywoodChicago.com.

The best films of 2012 are a mixed bag, but there was incredible experiences in all of them, brought forth from a mix of old veterans, new voices and even debut filmmakers. There is less of the end-of-the-world theme of 2011 as if the end is near, let’s have a celebration. It continues to amaze me, now in my fifth year as a professional film critic, that the creative landscape continues to astound the senses and deliver the goods.

Of course there are several films that could have occupied the 10th spot on the list. They include the 2011 stragglers – “We Have a Pope” and “Footnote.” The notable documentaries – “The Central Park Five,” “Ai WeiWei: Never Sorry” and “Samsara. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Kasaravalli Retrospective at Bengaluru International Film Festival 2012

6 December 2012 9:27 PM, PST | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

The fifth edition of the Bengaluru International Film Festival will hold retrospectives of Girish Kasaravalli and Jahnu Barua among others. Five of Kasaravalli’s films: Tabarana Kathe (1986), Kraurya (1996), Thaayi Saheba (1997), Dweepa (2003) and Hasina (2004)will be screened. While Barua’s Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (1987), Banani (1990), Firingoti (1992) and Hkhagoroloi Bohu Door(1995) will be screened.

 Besides, three other sections are dedicated to Indian cinema. Chitrabharathi – Indian Cinema Competition, Kannada Cinema (competition and screening of films in other dialects in Karnataka) and 100 years of Indian Cinema (screening of 14 films).

 Complete line up:

Retrospective

Chan-Wook Park (South Korea)

1. J.S.A.: Joint Security Area (Chan-Wook Park/110/2000/South Korea)

2. Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (Chan-Wook Park/129/2002/South Korea)

3. Old boy (Chan-Wook Park/120/2003/South Korea)

4. Lady Vengeance (Chan-Wook Park/112/2005/South Korea)

5. Thirst (Chan-Wook Park/133/2009/South Korea)

 

Fatih Akin (Germany)

1. Short Sharp Shock (Fatih Akin/100/1998/Germany)

2. In July (Fatih Akin/99/2000/Germany)

3. Solino (Fatih Akin/124/2002/Germany)

4. Head On (Fatih Akin/121/2004/Germany/Turkey »

- NewsDesk

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This Must Be The Place – The Review

20 November 2012 8:59 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

There’s something slightly off-kilter about This Must Be The Place – and it’s not just the heavy mascara that the film’s star Sean Penn wears throughout as Cheyenne, a former glam-rock superstar turned Nazi hunter. This Must Be The Place is not an easy movie to categorize. Is it a road movie, a revenge tale, an allegory, a vision quest? Undeniably it’s an original; an enjoyably quirky comedy-drama that never really goes anywhere but is an absorbing journey nonetheless.

At 50, Cheyenne still dresses ‘Goth’ and lives in a mansion in Dublin off his royalties with his supportive wife of 34 years (Frances Mcdormand). He moves haltingly, as if lost and seems to be suffering from depression. The death of his father, with whom he wasn’t on speaking terms, brings him home to New York where he discovers that the old man had an obsession: to seek revenge »

- Tom Stockman

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This Must Be the Place

20 November 2012 11:06 AM, PST | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

This Must Be the Place

Directed by: Paolo Sorrentino

Cast: Sean Penn, Frances McDormand, Judd Hirsch, Harry Dean Stanton

Running Time: 1 hr 58 mins

Rating: R

Release Date: November 16, 2012

Plot: A former goth rocker named Cheyenne (Penn) living in Dublin travels to America to kill a former Nazi who humiliated his father decades ago.

Who’S It For? Though inhabitants of the art house might be able to something of it, this movie will be best enjoyed by Penn cynics. If you’ve ever laughed at one of his many unsubtle moments as an actor, here is a full film of Penn falling apart.

Overall

It seems like all Hollywood actors play the clown at least once. Such often undeniably bad decisions come in the shape of integrity-questioning comedies, like when Stallone did Rhinestone or Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot, or when Eastwood did Pink Cadillac (in which Eastwood actually »

- Nick Allen

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Film Review: Strange, Beguiling Sean Penn in ‘This Must Be the Place’

17 November 2012 11:10 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Sean Penn picks his roles carefully, and famously said he didn’t know what the story meant in “Tree of Life.” His attachment to “This Must Be the Place” continues the vague journey through movieland, as he plays a bizarre and aging rock star whose life is about to get interesting.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

This movie doesn’t make a lot of sense – at a lot of points – but it does push the envelope as far as deconstructing narrative and opening up some scenic vistas. It is a reminder of Michelangelo Antonioni’s “The Passenger,” and somehow manages to be as vague as that famously soft storyline. Penn’s performance is exasperating, it’s bothersome from beginning to nearly the end, but damn if he doesn’t reel us in…again. His attention to character is stunning, the ticks and turns of his older rock star persona has many bad decisions, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Review: This Must Be the Place

15 November 2012 8:00 AM, PST | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

Anyone who's intrigued by where old goth rockers who survived the Eighties live out their days will be mildly entertained by Italian writer/director Paolo Sorrentino's darkly humorous film This Must Be the Place. Sorrentino takes quite a bit of creative license in this rambling and often disjointed tale of one fictional musician's struggles as he comes to term with personal tragedies and the lives he's touched through his music.

The multi-dimensional actor Sean Penn stars as Cheyenne, an aging goth rockstar living off his royalties on a vast estate in Dublin. His only companions are his confidante Mary (Eve Hewson), a 16-year-old Goth from a broken family, and his devoted and patient firefighter wife Jane (Frances McDormand). Cheyenne has been estranged from his family, not having spoken to his father in over 30 years. It is not until news of his father's failing health that he travels home to »

- Debbie Cerda

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This Must Be the Place Movie Review

13 November 2012 9:53 AM, PST | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

Title: This Must Be the Place Director: Paolo Sorrentino Here’s one for you: A quiet retired glam/gothic rocker, who still dresses the part every day, leaves his estate in Dublin for the United States; to fulfill his dying Jewish father’s legacy in finding the Nazi officer who tormented him during the Holocaust. You’re interested right? This Must Be the Place is a half character study, half road/finding yourself journey. In the first part of the 118 minutes, the audience receives a solid dose of Cheyenne (Sean Penn looking like Marilyn Manson and Ozzy Osbourne had a kid). After a successful rock stardom career about twenty years ago, the guy is  [ Read More ]

The post This Must Be the Place Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Joe Belcastro

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Review: ‘This Must Be The Place’ Offers Yet Another Brilliant Performance By Sean Penn

3 November 2012 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

  Editor’s note: With This Must Be the Place now officially released in theaters, here is a re-run of our Cannes review, originally published on May 20, 2011. Sean Penn‘s second appearance at this year’s fest – though in truth his first main once, since he was relegated to a side player in The Tree of Life - sees him don his finest goth garb and make-up to take an impressive shot at a Robert Smith type character. He plays Cheyenne, an aging former rock star, who seems happy to live off his royalties in a grand country house in Ireland with his wife (Frances McDormand), though really he is stagnating: depressed or bored, he can’t work out which. He gets an opportunity for respite when his father dies and he travels home to America for the funeral, subsequently learning that his father had been obsessed with tracking down a former Nazi Auschwitz guard who tormented him »

- Simon Gallagher

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‘This Must Be the Place’ is a strangely compelling oddity

2 November 2012 9:21 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

This Must Be the Place

Written by Umberto Contarello and Paolo Sorrentino

Directed by Paolo Sorrentino

Italy/France/Ireland, 2011

“Something’s wrong here. I don’t know exactly what it is, but something’s wrong here.” Repeated by its protagonist throughout This Must Be the Place, the line captures the baffling quality of Paolo Sorrentino’s English language debut. An erratic merging of different forms and tones, it is a difficult film to describe and one even harder to discuss in regards to why much of it succeeds. It is certainly schizophrenic conceptually and stylistically, but it also never feels disjointed or packed with too many strands.

Sean Penn plays a wealthy former rock star of around 50 years of age, Cheyenne, bored and jaded while in long-implemented retirement in Dublin. Perpetually slathered in the make-up and attire of his goth rock career, as well as frequently wielding cat eye glasses and a shopping trolley, »

- Josh Slater-Williams

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'This Must Be the Place': What the Critics Are Saying

1 November 2012 4:45 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

In Paolo Sorrentino's new film This Must Be the Place, Sean Penn plays Cheyenne, a retired American goth rock star who survived the height of his success and is now living off his acquired fortune in relative obscurity in Ireland. When Cheyenne's father, a Holocaust survivor, passes away, he returns to New York City and discovers secrets from his father's past that sets him off on a road trip across the country to find a fugitive Nazi guard his father spent his life searching for. The film also stars Frances McDormand as Cheyenne's wife, Judd Hirsch and Harry Dean Stanton

read more

»

- Joshua Stecker

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Review: This Must Be The Place Mixes Comedy, Absurdity, and Human Drama

1 November 2012 12:01 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

For some people, This Must Be The Place will be the new Sean Penn flick, for others it will be the new Paolo Sorrentino film. The difference may seem futile, but based on this simple distinction you might say that roughly one group is going to appreciate the film for what it is, while the other group will end up being bored to death. I'm in the believers group and thoroughly enjoyed Sorrentino's latest effort, but it's definitely not a film for everyone. Ever since I discovered Sorrentino's Le Conseguenze dell'Amore, I've been following the man with heightened enthusiasm. Il Divo was a small disappointment, but with This Must Be The Place Sorrentino proves that Le Conseguenze dell'Amore was more than just a lucky hit. »

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Review: Rambling, Ragged 'This Must Be The Place' Isn't Nearly As Bad As You Feared

1 November 2012 11:03 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The initial first glimpses for "This Must Be the Place" promised disaster, with a pitch of Sean Penn playing a burned-out post-punk rocker on the hunt for Nazis, and advance photos where Penn's jet-black corona of hair and dour made-up jowls made him look less like someone who had imitated The Cure's Robert Smith and more like someone who had killed, skinned and eaten Smith before donning his coiffure and face in celebration. And that level of preliminary expectation-lowering was confounding; this was the follow-up from Paolo Sorrentino after the acclaimed political epic "Il Divo," which was nominated for the Palme d'Or and earned Sorrentino a Jury Prize at Cannes in 2008. It seemed like the kind of directorial hubris that would be a prelude to both wonderment and bewilderment -- like a cartoon car crash, or the mass demolition of a model train set, where no one is actually hurt »

- James Rocchi

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This Must Be the Place | Review

31 October 2012 8:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

But I Guess I’m Already There: Why is Sorrentino’s Strange, Offbeat English Language Debut…?

The promising combination of Italian master Paolo Sorrentino’s English language debut toplined by American acting icon Sean Penn as an aging Goth musician turned Nazi hunter seems too deliriously good to be true. And, as a cohesively entertaining film, that’s mostly true. One only has to look at the film’s marketing campaign to see how buzz about the film has been ratcheted solely by use of Penn’s costume inspiring visage, resembling a plucked scarecrow recycled for one too many harvests. This is the blessing and the curse of Sorrentino’s bizarre exercise, This Must Be The Place, thus named after the Talking Heads tune, a film that manages to give us a humorous and amusing performance from Penn, who dominates every frame, but resists blending successfully with the rest of the narrative. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Berlusconi, celebrity and the mafia in the spotlight

19 October 2012 5:07 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A couple of Italian gems along with a more sugary offering are screened at the London film festival, which this year has been reorganised by themes

For a working critic based in the capital, the London film festival is an enticing prospect — and yet a frustrating experience. The regular round of UK releases must be attended to; those films have to be reviewed (including the inevitable sprinkling of duds) and so Lff films have to be squeezed in wherever possible.

What makes it all more agonising is the fact that the Lff programme is somehow always the most mouthwatering document produced by any festival: a juicily thick brochure, packed with great stuff, and an unmissable-looking film on every page. The Lff may not have as many premieres as Toronto, Venice and Cannes, but so what? That's the sort of thing that preoccupies industry types. Regular filmgoers in London are surely »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Q & A: Sorrentino Talks Sean Penn-Starrer 'This Must Be the Place'

17 October 2012 4:06 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

One of the more intriguing films opening this November stars Sean Penn in the most unconventional role of his life. In "This Must Be The Place," from the Italian writer-director Paolo Sorrentino, he plays Cheyenne, a rich, retired rock star, now about 50, who chooses to hold on to the way he looked in his glory days – hair dyed black and back-combed, mascara, pancake make-up and scarlet lipstick. (The real rock icon he most closely resembles is the Cure’s Robert Smith.)   Squeaky-voiced and defiantly eccentric, Cheyenne lives with his wife (Frances McDormand) in a rambling mansion in Dublin; Ireland is a tax haven for creative artists. His home is filled with expensive gadgets, toys and art works. He spends most of his time shopping in a neighborhood mall. He’s a jaded husk of a man with no apparent purpose left in life.   But when he hears his father is dying, »

- David Gritten

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This Must Be the Place Poster with Sean Penn

15 October 2012 12:54 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Weinstein Company has debuted the fifth poster for This Must Be the Place, the new drama from writer-director Paolo Sorrentino (Il Divo). Oscar winner Sean Penn stars as Cheyanne, an affluent musician who goes on a quest to reclaim his late father's honor by tracking down the Nazi war criminal who tortured his dad. Take a look at this one-sheet featuring Sean Penn and his wall of hair.

This Must Be the Place comes to theaters November 2nd, 2012 and stars Robert De Niro, Sean Penn, Frances McDormand, Tom Archdeacon. The film is directed by Paolo Sorrentino. »

- MovieWeb

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This Must Be The Place official movie poster arrives

15 October 2012 11:48 AM, PDT | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

Check out the official poster for Weinstein Co's This Must Be The Place, directed by Paolo Sorrentino and starring Sean Penn, Frances McDormand, Judd Hirsch, Eve Hewson and Kerry Condon. The film opens in limited areas from November 2nd, and is scripted by Sorrentino as well as Umberto Contarello. Nicola Giuliano and Francesca Cima produce. In This Must Be The Place, Cheyenne (Sean Penn) is a former rock star. At 50, he still dresses 'Goth' and lives in Dublin off his royalties. The death of his father, with whom he wasn't on speaking terms, brings him back to New York. He discovers his father had an obsession: to seek revenge for a humiliation he had suffered. Cheyenne decides to pick up where his father left off, and starts a journey, at his own pace, across America. »

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This Must Be The Place official movie poster arrives

15 October 2012 11:48 AM, PDT | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

Check out the official poster for Weinstein Co's This Must Be The Place, directed by Paolo Sorrentino and starring Sean Penn, Frances McDormand, Judd Hirsch, Eve Hewson and Kerry Condon. The film opens in limited areas from November 2nd, and is scripted by Sorrentino as well as Umberto Contarello. Nicola Giuliano and Francesca Cima produce. In This Must Be The Place, Cheyenne (Sean Penn) is a former rock star. At 50, he still dresses 'Goth' and lives in Dublin off his royalties. The death of his father, with whom he wasn't on speaking terms, brings him back to New York. He discovers his father had an obsession: to seek revenge for a humiliation he had suffered. Cheyenne decides to pick up where his father left off, and starts a journey, at his own pace, across America. »

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Watch: Danger is Sean Penn's Middle Name in 'This Must Be the Place' Trailer (Video)

4 September 2012 11:58 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Fifteen seconds into the trailer for Paolo Sorrentino's "This Must Be the Place," and Sean Penn awkward laughing as has-been rock star Cheyenne -- a breathy giggle that emanates from lips tinged with red lipstick -- helps to immediately set the tone for the remaining minute and 45 seconds. It's a light, quirky trailer -- bouncy, almost -- though the issues that thrust it forward are indisputably dark: Cheyenne, after learning of his father's passing, sets out on the road (Kerouac-style) to seek out his father's persecutor during his time at Auschwitz so many years ago. It also seems to play out as a coming-of-(middle)-age story -- Cheyenne appears uncomfortable in his own skin, his nervous giggles betraying the façade of an otherwise bored man.   Juggling the Holocaust and daddy issues in one film is a heavy task; considering, in particular, that Penn's character admits only knowing about »

- Justin Krajeski

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‘This Must Be The Place’ Trailer: Sean Penn Puts on Lipstick to Hunt Down a Nazi

3 September 2012 7:20 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Like a bizarre rumor, This Must Be The Place has been floating around out there for a while. It saw audiences at Cannes 2011 (where Simon fell in love with it) and then traveled to Sundance, so even though its journey hasn’t been as long as some festival flicks out there, it’s nice to see it finally see the darkened theater light of day. From director Paolo Sorrentino, the film stars Sean Penn as a former rock star who is spurred by his father’s death to learn more about the man and to track down the Nazi death camp guard who tormented him. He does this all while looking like Robert Smith from The Cure and talking as if years of drug use made him permanently dehydrated. From the trailer, it looks to be a serious subject handled with dry absurdity. Check it out for yourself: This Must Be The Place hits theaters on November »

- Cole Abaius

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1-20 of 86 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


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