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The Friends and Other Stars Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher Will Join at Legendary L.A. Cemetery

The Friends and Other Stars Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher Will Join at Legendary L.A. Cemetery
Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher will be buried among many other famous stars at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Los Angeles.

Reynolds’s son and Fisher’s younger brother Todd Fisher told ABC’s 20/20 that he is planning a joint service with Billie Lourd, 24, his niece and Fisher’s daughter. According to Todd, his mother and sister will be buried “among friends,” at Forest Lawn Memorial Park.

Fisher, 60, was aboard an 11-hour flight from London to Los Angeles on Friday, Dec. 23, when she went into cardiac arrest. She later died that following Tuesday in the hospital. Reynolds died a
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Barney Miller: Hal Linden Looks Back at the Popular Sitcom

Barney Miller is back. Recently, star Hal Linden spoke to the Av Club about the popular ABC sitcom.Created by Danny Arnold and Theodore J. Flicker, the series followed the detectives of New York's fictional 12th precinct. Linden played the lead, Captain Barney Miller, alongside Abe Vigoda, Max Gail, Ron Glass, Jack Soo, Gregory Sierra, and James Gregory. The show ran on ABC for eight seasons before ending in 1982.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Joss Whedon and ‘Firefly’ Cast Pay Tribute to Actor Ron Glass

  • Indiewire
Joss Whedon and ‘Firefly’ Cast Pay Tribute to Actor Ron Glass
2016 hasn’t been kind to celebrities (or almost anyone else, for that matter). The latest casualty of this annus horribilis is Ron Glass, who passed away on Friday at the age of 71. The actor was best known for his work on the shows “Barney Miller” and “Firefly,” and many of his co-stars and colleagues have taken to social media to mark his passing.

Read More: ‘Firefly’: Nathan Fillion Reveals the Key Scene Joss Whedon Never Got to Make

“He got there with grace, humor & enormous heart,” tweeted Joss Whedon, who created the cult favorite “Firefly.” “He was, among so many other things, my Shepherd. Raise, appropriately, a glass. Rest, Ron.” Whedon was joined by a host of others on Twitter and Instagram:

"Shepard, don't move." "Won't go far." We love you, Ron Glass. Don't go far.

A photo posted by Nathan Fillion (@natefillion) on Nov 26, 2016 at 2:09pm Pst
See full article at Indiewire »

Busan Film Review: ‘Sunday Beauty Queen’

Revealing beauty to be more than just skin deep, Babyruth Villarama’s documentary “Sunday Beauty Queen” shows Filipino domestic helpers in Hong Kong finding fulfillment through beauty pageants. Tracking the lives of five women over an on-off period of four years, the film begins with a generalized overview about foreign workers’ unfair conditions, but finds its own groove at the climactic event, which transforms them in a glamorous new light. Hard-hitting exposé this isn’t, though the filmmaker’s solidarity with her subjects is obvious. The film is a welcome addition to the growing body of work on migrant labor with good prospects for documentary fest play.

Villarama’s last documentary, “Jazz in Love,” focused narrowly on the vagaries of a romance between a gay Filipino and his German fiancé. Here, she again strikes up a trusting rapport with her subjects, thus enabling her to catch them in their most expressive and unguarded moments.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Theodore J. Flicker, Filmmaker and ‘Barney Miller’ Co-Creator, Dies at 84

Theodore J. Flicker, a filmmaker whose eclectic career included the Cold War comedy “The President’s Analyst” and the much-loved ABC comedy “Barney Miller,” died Sept. 13 at his home in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 84.

Flicker’s family told the Santa Fe New Mexican that the writer-helmer died in his sleep.

Flicker moved into Hollywood after working with an improvisational group in New York that he co-founded, the Premise. Members including future showbiz notables George Segal, Joan Darling and Buck Henry. The group helped Flicker produce his first film, the indie cult classic “The Troublemaker” (1964).

Flicker directed episodes of a handful of TV series, including “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” got his first break in features by co-writing the Elvis Presley feature “Spinout” (1966) and then really broke through with 1967 comedy “The President’s Analyst,” an offbeat send-up of the era’s obsession with thrillers, spies and psychoanalysis that Flicker wrote and directed.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Theodore J. Flicker, Filmmaker and ‘Barney Miller’ Co-Creator, Dies at 84

Theodore J. Flicker, a filmmaker whose eclectic career included the Cold War comedy “The President’s Analyst” and the much-loved ABC comedy “Barney Miller,” died Sept. 13 at his home in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 84.

Flicker’s family told the Santa Fe New Mexican that the writer-helmer died in his sleep.

Flicker moved into Hollywood after working with an improvisational group in New York that he co-founded, the Premise. Members including future showbiz notables George Segal, Joan Darling and Buck Henry. The group helped Flicker produce his first film, the indie cult classic “The Troublemaker” (1964).

Flicker directed episodes of a handful of TV series, including “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” got his first break in features by co-writing the Elvis Presley feature “Spinout” (1966) and then really broke through with 1967 comedy “The President’s Analyst,” an offbeat send-up of the era’s obsession with thrillers, spies and psychoanalysis that Flicker wrote and directed.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

DVD Review: "Barney Miller: The Complete Series" From Shout! Factory

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

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Like most children of the 1970s, television viewing was a big part of my week. Beginning at 7:30 Pm and ending two and-a-half hours later, my family’s Thursday nights consisted of That’s Hollywood, Mork and Mindy, Angie, Barney Miller, and Carter Country. Not having seen Barney Miller until well into its sixth season, I just assumed that the entire show took place in the police station. Now that the show’s entire series is available in a DVD box set, courtesy of the fine folks at Shout! Factory, my initial impressions of the show were proven wrong. The pilot episode features Barney Miller’s family, specifically his wife, played with charm by Barbara Barrie. Abe Vigoda, Maxwell Gail, and Ron Glass appear from the get-go, and guest star Chu Chu Malave, who played Maria’s boyfriend who tackles
See full article at CinemaRetro »

New Release: Barney Miller Complete Series DVD

Release Date: Oct. 25, 2011

Price: DVD $159.99

Studio: Shout! Factory

New York City's 12th Precinct is abuzz in Barney Miller.

Airing on ABC TV from 1974 through 1982, Barney Miller remains one of television’s liveliest New York-based situation comedies of the 1970s. That said, Barney Miller: The Complete Series has a lot of life pumping through its veins!

The classic show is set in a New York City police station in Greenwich Village, a colorful, bustling place filled with a mix of cops, detectives and administrators of a whole lot of ethnic and racial types (Puerto Ricans, Jews, African-Americans, Asians, Poles, you name it).

Hal Linden stars in the series as the titular Barney Miller. As the precinct’s captain, Barney somehow manages to maintain order over this group of inner-city law enforcers, who are undeniably good at their jobs but are always looking for something else to do. (A little gambling,
See full article at Disc Dish »

The Green Berets Blu-Ray Review – Win Yours Here

The politically-charged Vietnam War film The Green Berets caused a critical firestorm when it was released, but it has maintained a fanbase for more than forty years now, and you can now update your collection with the Blu-Ray release. The story of the film (starring John Wayne, Jim Hutton, David Jannsen, Bruce Cabot, Jack Soo, George Takei, and many more) is already so well-known it's hardly worth reiterating. Green Berets go on a couple of missions in Vietnam, and a reporter has his perspective adjusted. Unapologetically pro-America, the film was (at least to some degree) unfairly raked over the coals when it came out, often criticized solely on the basis of differing viewpoint. Roger Ebert rather famously (at least by now) gave the film zero stars (not a common event), but goes on to criticize the film in a way that doesn't particularly necessitate seeing it, and doesn't distinguish it
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Sfiaaff 2009: You Don’T Know Jack (The Jack Soo Story)—Interview With Jeff Adachi

In the office of Jeff Adachi, San Francisco’s Public Defender, there’s a wooden African sculpture bristling with nails. Adachi explains that each nail driven into the sculpture represents an obstacle overcome or a conflict resolved; a guiding sentiment to inform daily work. Adachi and I first met when he premiered his first documentary The Slanted Screen: Asian Men In Film and Television at the 2006 San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival (Sfiaaff). I wrote up the film, recounted personal resonances, and interviewed Adachi for a new online project of mine that I had decided to call The Evening Class. Three years later and here we are—gratefully!—once again. My thanks to Jeff for inviting me to his office to discuss his latest film You Don’t Know Jack: The Jack Soo Story, premiering at Sfiaaff’s 27th edition.
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

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