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‘Diamonds are Forever’ over the top but dull

Diamonds are Forever

Directed by Guy Hamilton

Screenplay by Richard Maibaum & Tom Mankiewicz

UK, 1971

Following up On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, widely considered by most fans to be the best Bond incarnation pre-reboot, here the series takes a step back to recast the iconic Sean Connery in the role of mischievous misogynist Jimmy B, and promptly trips over itself in a strangely crass and dull outing. Replacing the wooden George Lazenby with the series’ original super spy proves to be mere consolation rather than icing on the cake bomb.

Diamonds are Forever surprisingly starts with direct continuity, with Bond leading a ruthless and fisticuffs laden hunt across the world for wife killer Ernst Stavros Blofelt (played here by Charles Gray). He eventually tracks down the evil mastermind and gives him a searing exit to proceedings, or so it seems. Getting back to the small matter of his day job
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1990′s

Villains have always been and will always be some of the most fascinating and memorable characters in the world of genre film. Here we will take a look at the greatest villains of cinema from the 1990’s.

The criteria for this article is the same as in my previous articles Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1970’s and Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1980’s: the villains must be from live-action films-no animated features-and must pose some type of direct of indirect lethal threat. The villains can either be individuals or small groups that act as one unit.

The villains must be human or human in appearance. Also, individuals that are the central protagonists/antiheroes of their respective films were excluded.

Brad Dourif as The Gemini Killer in The Exorcist III (William Peter Blatty, 1990): Veteran actor Dourif is intense and unforgettable as an executed murderer inhabiting someone else’s body in
See full article at SoundOnSight »

50 Years of Bond: ‘Diamonds are Forever’ over the top but dull

Diamonds are Forever

Directed by Guy Hamilton

Screenplay by Richard Maibaum & Tom Mankiewicz

UK, 1971

Following up On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, widely considered by most fans to be the best Bond incarnation pre-reboot, here the series takes a step back to recast the iconic Sean Connery in the role of mischievous misogynist Jimmy B, and promptly trips over itself in a strangely crass and dull outing. Replacing the wooden George Lazenby with the series’ original super spy proves to be mere consolation rather than icing on the cake bomb.

Diamonds are Forever surprisingly starts with direct continuity, with Bond leading a ruthless and fisticuffs laden hunt across the world for wife killer Ernst Stavros Blofelt (played here by Charles Gray). He eventually tracks down the evil mastermind and gives him a searing exit to proceedings, or so it seems. Getting back to the small matter of his day job
See full article at SoundOnSight »

James Bond Declassified: File #7 - 'Diamonds Are Forever' is Connery's last shot

  • Hitfix
James Bond Declassified: File #7 - 'Diamonds Are Forever' is Connery's last shot
James Bond 007 Declassified File #7: "Diamonds Are Forever" This series will trace the cinema history of James Bond, while also examining Ian Fleming's original novels as source material and examining how faithful (or not) the films have been to his work. Directed by Guy Hamilton Screenplay by Richard Maibuam and Tom Makiewicz Produced by Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli Characters / Cast James Bond / Sean Connery Tiffany Case / Jill St. John Ernst Stavro Blofeld / Charles Gray Plenty O'Toole / Lana Wood Willard Whyte / Jimmy Dean Saxby / Bruce Cabot Mr. Kidd / Putter Smith Mr....
See full article at Hitfix »

James Bond Retrospective: Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

To mark the 50th Anniversary of one of the most successful movie franchises of all time and as James Bond prepares for his 23rd official outing in Skyfall later this year, I have been tasked with taking a retrospective look at the films that turned author Ian Fleming’s creation into one of the most recognised and iconic characters in film history.

Following the departure of George Lazenby after just one film in the lead role, producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman were left wondering if the success and popularity of the series so far had been down to just one man, Sean Connery. While Lazenby had made a good impression as Bond in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service his performance was essentially a reinterpretation of Connery rather than a reinvention of the role itself. With the producers keen to cast a new lead they set to work auditioning actors for the part,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

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