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Christian Slater's Father Threatened to Kill Him and His Mother, She Alleges in New Legal Documents

Christian Slater has filed a motion to strike his father's defamation lawsuit against him. In legal documents obtained by People, Christian's mother Mary Jo Slater issued a declaration in support of her son's motion to strike the lawsuit, detailing claims of her ex-husband Thomas Knight Slater's diagnosis with manic-depressive schizophrenia and threw her into traffic when she was five months pregnant with Christian. (Thomas, 80, is suing his son for at least $20 million, claiming he "ruined" Thomas' acting career because the Mr. Robot star said his father was "suffering from manic-depressive schizophrenia" in a December 2015 interview - years after Thomas' last credited role on IMDb,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Lawsuit Against Christian Slater by His Father Is Part of a 'Long and Difficult Situation' Says Family Source

  • PEOPLE.com
The $20 million lawsuit filed by Thomas Knight Slater against his son Christian Slater has a complicated back story. Slater's father, 80, acted using the stage name Michael Hawkins. He appeared on the soap opera Ryan's Hope in the 1970s. The elder Slater claims his son "ruined" his acting career because the Mr. Robot star said his father was "suffering from manic-depressive schizophrenia" in a December 2015 interview — years after the elder Slater's last credited role on IMDb, a small part in the 1988 action film Midnight Run. But a family source says Slater's father a has long history of personal struggle. "His father has had his troubles,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Lawsuit Against Christian Slater by His Father Is Part of a 'Long and Difficult Situation' Says Family Source

  • PEOPLE.com
The $20 million lawsuit filed by Thomas Knight Slater against his son Christian Slater has a complicated back story. Slater's father, 80, acted using the stage name Michael Hawkins. He appeared on the soap opera Ryan's Hope in the 1970s. The elder Slater claims his son "ruined" his acting career because the Mr. Robot star said his father was "suffering from manic-depressive schizophrenia" in a December 2015 interview — years after the elder Slater's last credited role on IMDb, a small part in the 1988 action film Midnight Run. But a family source says Slater's father a has long history of personal struggle. "His father has had his troubles,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Christian Slater's Father Sues His Star Son for $20 Million for Allegedly Claiming He Suffered from Schizophrenia

Christian Slater is being sued for at least $20 million by his father Thomas Knight Slater.

According to documents obtained by People, Slater's father claims his son "ruined" his acting career after the Mr. Robot star said his father was "suffering from manic-depressive schizophrenia" in a December 2015 interview.

Thomas, whose stage name is Michael Hawkins, accuses his son and ex-wife Mary Jo Slater of slander, libel, defamation of character, intentional interference with prospective economic advantage, invasion of privacy as well as intentional infliction of emotional distress. A jury trial is demanded.

A representative for Slater has not responded to request for comment.
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

Christian Slater Sued By His Father for Defamation of Character, Seeks $20 Million in Damages

Christian Slater is being sued for at least $20 million by his father Thomas Knight Slater. According to documents obtained by People, Slater's father claims his son "ruined" his acting career after the Mr. Robot star said his father was "suffering from manic-depressive schizophrenia" in a December 2015 interview. Thomas, whose stage name is Michael Hawkins, accuses his son and ex-wife Mary Jo Slater of slander, libel, defamation of character, intentional interference with prospective economic advantage, invasion of privacy as well as intentional infliction of emotional distress. A jury trial is demanded. A representative for Slater has not responded to request for comment.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Christian Slater: The Hollywood Flasback Interview

I interviewed actor Christian Slater in November, 2008 for Venice Magazine. Having long had a reputation as an "enfant terrible" in his youth, Slater surprised me somewhat with his calm, measured demeanor and thoughtful outlook. He was promoting his well-reviewed, but ultimately short-lived, TV series "My Own Worst Enemy," which we discussed a bit, but Slater was eager to reflect on his entire career and life, which he did with aplomb. My other memory of the chat is that during our dinner, the power went out in the restaurant or hotel where we met (the location of which has been lost to time) and the halogen streetlights outside casting our talk in a strange, other-worldly glow for a good 30 minutes. All these factors made our meeting a memorable one. Slater can currently be seen on the new USA Network series "Mr. Robot," which is also being lauded critically, and will hopefully
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Christian Slater on 'Mr. Robot' and Why He's Returning to TV

Christian Slater on 'Mr. Robot' and Why He's Returning to TV
On the first day of shooting the new USA Network techno-thriller Mr. Robot (premiering on Weds, June 24th), Christian Slater faced one of those scenes that can make or break a television series. The show revolves a dangerously alienated super-hacker named Elliot (24's Rami Malek) who's recruited by Slater's mysterious "Mr. Robot" to join a band of cyber-saboteurs. In a nod to the 1949 movie classic The Third Man, the two men talk on Coney Island's Wonder Wheel, as Slater's character lays out his ideology and his plans to change the world — in other words,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Indie feature film 'The Squeeze' begins casting actors and extras in Wilmington - Los Angeles Acting Auditions | Examiner.com

Pathos Films and Jastrow Productions are now set to begin shooting the indie feature film "The Squeeze" on October 18th in Wilmington, Nc. The six-time Primetime Emmy Award nominated casting director, Mary Jo Slater, has been auditioning actors in Los Angeles for starring and co-starring roles. Additional principal actor casting has been taking place in Wilmington by Fincannon & Associates. Now the extras casting director in Wilmington is sending out casting calls for some small speaking roles, featured background actors, and general extras. Starring in "The Squeeze" is Young Artist Awards winner Jeremy Sumpter playing the lead role of Augie. Sumpter is a quickly rising star whose credits include the role of J.D. McCoy in the NBC series "Friday Night Lights," the title role in Universal Pictures 2003 feature film "Peter Pan," and the TriStar Pictures feature film "Soul Surfer". He also has three feature films in post-production, and three films in pre-production.
See full article at LA Acting Auditions »

Four ABC Dramas Get Casting Directors

Four ABC drama pilots, including one from “Mad Men” writer Chris Black and the Sofia Vergara-executive produced “Killer Women,” now have casting directors attached, Backstage has learned. “Killer Women,” which has been adapted from an Argentinian series, follows the only female Texas Ranger who takes a no-nonsense approach to her job. Mary Jo Slater and Steve Brooksbank are casting the one-hour drama. “Reckless,” which was written by Black, is about a man willing to go to any length to free his wife, a political prisoner in a volatile foreign country. It’s being cast by David Rapaport. Meanwhile, “Betrayal,” which centers on an affair between a photographer and a lawyer who turns out to be defending a client that her husband is prosecuting, is being cast by Veronica Collins Rooney. “The Returned” also has casting directors attached. The drama pilot is set in a small town where the long-dead
See full article at Backstage »

Four Casting Directors Help Break You into TV at Actorfest La

  • Backstage
In the Television Drama Casting panel at Actorfest La, four amazing Casting Directors -- with credits that include "Dirty, Sexy, Money," "Shameless," "Gossip Girl," and "Bones" -- teach you how to break into TV.Want to know how to break in to television dramas? From co-stars to series regulars and from pre-read to network test -- top casting directors discuss all sides of television procedurals casting.Speakers include (bios below): -- Mary Jo Slater, Casting Director-- John Frank Levey, Casting Director-- David Rapaport, Casting Director-- Rick Millikan, Casting DirectorTo register for this dynamic workshop, visit actorfestla2011.eventbrite.com.Proud casting accomplishments for Mary Jo Slater include William Friedkin's "Twelve Angry Men" for Showtime, starring Jack Lemmon, George C. Scott, and James Gandolfini and receiving a C.S.A. nomination; the DreamWorks feature "The Contender," starring Joan Allen, Jeff Bridges, and Gary Oldman and also receiving a C.S.
See full article at Backstage »

'Gossip Girl' CD David Rapaport Joins TV Drama Casting Panel at Actorfest La

  • Backstage
David Rapaport, casting director for "Gossip Girl" and "90210," will join CDs Rick Millikan ("Bones," "The X-Files"), John Frank Levey ("Shameless," "ER"), and Mary Jo Slater ("The Starter Wife," pilot of "Dirty, Sexy, Money") on the Television Drama Casting Panel at Actorfest La. Actorfest La, which is brought to you by Back Stage, the Actor's Resource, will take place on Saturday, November 5th at the California Market Center in downtown Los Angeles.To help kickstart your career, Actorfest offers more than two dozen exclusive Workshops; Casting Calls; Meet & Drops with Top Casting Directors; a Networking Café; and an enormous Exhibit Hall, at which you can meet with acting teachers, coaches, schools, headshot photographers, and many more vendors who will help you succeed in your career.To register for Actorfest La, please visit actorfestla2011.eventbrite.com.  For more information, visit www.ActorfestLA.com. As you register, take advantage of our special limited-time subscription offers.
See full article at Backstage »

‘Girls, Guns & Gambling’ Features Christian Slater, Gary Oldman and Dane Cook

‘Girls, Guns & Gambling’ Features Christian Slater, Gary Oldman and Dane Cook
That's, uh, some kind of cast. Never thought I'd live to see the day where Gary Oldman shared the screen with Dane Cook, but it's coming, thanks to the casting director of Girls, Guns & Gambling, who apparently has quite the sense of humor. (And, no, it's not Christian Slater's mom, veteran casting director Mary Jo Slater.) The film is a crime thriller from writer/director Michael Winnick, and if you think it sounds like a weird ride based on the cast and title, just wait until you read the logline. Ok, we don't exactly have a logline, but THR says the film includes "Elvis impersonators, Indians, modern cowboys, a 6-foot-tall blond assassin, a frat boy, a corrupt sheriff and a prostitute into a chase for a priceless American Indian artifact stolen during a poker game at an Indian casino." Furthermore, the report offers that Christian Slater is basically the straight man,
See full article at Slash Film »

Emmy Nominations Reveal Few Surprises

It's a good day for funny people, especially if your name is Tina Fey or Seth MacFarlane.

Fey's series, 30 Rock, was handed 22 Emmy nominations this morning, which stands as a record for a comedy series. She and Alec Baldwin were also nominated for acting awards. Plus, for the first time some of the other actors on NBC's laffer were recognized. Jane Krakowski, Jack McBrayer and Tracy Morgan all picked up supporting nominations.

MacFarlane's Family Guy was also nominated for best comedy series, the first time an animated show has cracked that category since The Flintstones in 1961. Two years ago MacFarlane decided to pull his show from contention in the animated series category to have it considered for best comedy.

Mad Men, the drama about the advertising world in the sixties, picked up 16 nominations in the drama categories, including a best actor nod for Jon Hamm. Hamm is also nominated as
See full article at CinemaSpy »

The 61st Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Nominations

The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences announced the nominations for The 61st Annual Primetime Emmy Awards this morning. NBC comedy series 30 Rock lead the way with 22 nominations with the HBO telefilm Grey Gardens with 17 nominations and last year's winner for Best Drama, Mad Men, with 16 nominations. Take a look at the complete list of the nominees below.

Outstanding Voice-Over Performance

American Masters - Jerome Robbins: Something To Dance About - PBS - Thirteen/Wnet American Masters - Ron Rifkin, Narrator

Family Guy - I Dream of Jesus - Fox - Fox Television Animation - Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin

Robot Chicken - Robot Chicken: Star Wars - Episode II - Cartoon Network - ShadowMachine - Seth Green as Robot Chicken Nerd, Bob Goldstein, Ponda Baba, Anakin Skywalker, Imperial Officer

The Simpsons - Eeny Teeny Maya Moe - Fox - Gracie Films in Association with 20th Century Fox Television
See full article at MovieWeb »

Slater's Mother Makes Movie About New York 'Home Of The Stars'

  • WENN
Christian Slater's producer mother is making a movie about a New York apartment block that has been home to stars like Alicia Keys, Angela Lansbury and Larry David.

The trio all lived at Manhattan Plaza, a government-subsidised building for performing artists in the city's Hell's Kitchen neighbourhood.

Mary Jo Slater, who lived there from 1977 to 1986, has gathered together famous former residents - and actor Samuel L. Jackson who once worked as a security guard in the block - to help her make The Miracle on 42nd Street.

The documentary is due for release later in 2008.

Slater's Mother Makes Emotional Appeal to Press

  • WENN
Slater's Mother Makes Emotional Appeal to Press
Actor Christian Slater's mother Mary Jo Slater has made a passionate appeal to the press, begging them to stop writing about her son's love life and troubled past - and focus on his charitable acts instead. Hollywood casting director Mary Jo is furious about the media's obsession with the True Romance star's past drug addictions, 1997 jail spell, failed marriage to Ryan Haddon and false reports he's romancing teen star Lindsay Lohan. And Slater's mother is so determined to protect her son, she's issued a statement insisting he is no longer the young, foolish man he once was, but now dedicates himself to good causes. She says, "Knowing Christian better than anyone else, I had to respond. Christian has many wonderful traits. He made mistakes. He was young and wild. When you're young and wild, you make mistakes that you regret later in life. He is a wonderful and loving son, a kind, gentle and very funny person. He is painfully aware of his tarnished reputation. It saddens me that no matter how much he does that is good and positive, his past is always thrown in his face. When River Phoenix died of a drug overdose, Christian was asked to take over his role in Interview With The Vampire, she added. Was it ever reported that he donated his entire salary for the film to River's favorite charity?"

Slater to Quit Los Angeles for London

  • WENN
Slater to Quit Los Angeles for London
Christian Slater plans to leave his former wild Los Angeles lifestyle behind for good by making London his permanent home. The Hollywood star, 35, who has been appearing on the West End stage in a critically-acclaimed production of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, has decided to quit the star-packed city to reside in the British capitol with his wife Ryan Haddon and their two children Jaden, five, and three-year-old Eliana. Slater's mother and Los Angeles casting agent Mary Jo Slater says, "I don't think he would ever go back if he could help it. "Life in Los Angeles is no fun. He was raised in New York and he finds London is more like that, only with more to do."

The Tracker

The Tracker
ArtMattan Prods.

NEW YORK -- Australian director Rolf De Heer's Outback saga "The Tracker" has the punch of a good Western with a clean and direct script plus an adventurous use of songs and folk paintings. The film's single-minded, somewhat stylized approach reminds of Clint Eastwood at his most economic and brutal -- "High Plains Drifter", for instance. "The Tracker" has no warm moments and few scenes of redemption. General audiences will probably find these raw emotions a tough watch, though critics and cineastes will certainly be impressed. The story's similarities to Philip Noyce's talked-about "Rabbit Proof Fence" could widen its boxoffice appeal.

De Heer's script tells of four very different men on the trail of an Aboriginal fugitive in 1920s Australia: The Fanatic (Gary Sweet, from De Heer's more recent "Alexandra's Project"), a racial supremacist who hates all Aborigines

the Follower (Damon Gameau), a nervy rookie policeman

the Veteran (Grant Page), an aging conscript with no stomach for his job

and the Aboriginal Tracker (David Gulpilil), who seems content to do the white men's bidding.

As the quartet range deeper into the Outback, conflicts develop. The Fanatic murders any Aborigine he comes across. These acts of violence gradually alienate him from the Follower. The Tracker, in his element, coolly manipulates the situation to his advantage and finally dispenses rough justice to the white men.

De Heer's approach to narrative is unusual. He allows folksy songs (written by Graham Tardif and sung by Archie Roach) to run at length over the images. Far from being background music, these songs elucidate both the history of the treatment of Aborigines and the feelings of the Tracker. The acts of violence are represented by Aboriginal paintings inserted into the narrative. Ian Jones' cinematography emphasizes the vastness of the land, effectively using a quick zoom -- usually the most reviled of photographic techniques -- to pick out a relevant feature or character in the Outback.

The film is unequivocal in its depiction of how the settlers sought to destroy Aboriginal life and culture.by Stephen Hopkins and Eric Bross. Hopkins, whose experience at action shows includes directing "24," brings a brisk pace and a sharp eye for composition to the first night. Bross maintains the roller-coaster ride on the second and third nights, eliciting strong but restrained performances. In particular, Koteas shines as the mysterious but dedicated agent juggling long-distance family responsibilities with a job that doesn't come with a well-defined playbook.

Vancouver fills in for Seattle thanks, in part, to geographical proximity and similar climates. Scenes of foreign locales, also shot in Vancouver, are more generic and slightly less convincing.

TRAFFIC: THE MINISERIES

USA Network

Initial Entertainment Group

Credits:

Executive producer/writer: Ron Hutchinson

Producers: Stephen Hopkins, Jay Benson

Consulting producer: Ilene Kahn Power

Directors: Stephen Hopkins, Eric Bross

Director of photography: Joel Ransom

Production designer: David Fischer

Editors: Tod Feuerman, John Duffy

Music: Jeff Rona

Art director: Don Macaulay

Set decorator: Dominique Fauguet-Lemaitre

Casting: Mary Jo Slater, Steve Brooksbank

Cast:

Adam Kadyrov: Cliff Curtis

Mike McKay: Elias Koteas

Brent Delaney: Martin Donovan

Ben Edmonds: Balthazar Getty

Carole McKay: Mary McCormack

Fazal: Ritchie Coster

Ronny Cho: Nelson Lee

Alex Edmonds: Tony Musante

Tyler McKay: Justin Chatwin

Kahn: Brian George

Angie: Jennifer Rae Westleyear="none" />Editors: William Morris, Teki Cruickshank, Adrian Herrera, Fred Hawthorne, Marc Cahill, Michael Auerbach, Brian Horn, Jeff Cooper

Host: George Gray

Starring:

Todd Santos="none" />No MPAA rating " />Shane McCutcheon: Katherine Moennig

Dana Fairbanks: Erin Daniels

Alice Pieszecki: Leisha Hailey

Kit Porter: Pam Grierppencott, David Vanacore, Mark T. Williams

Main title theme: The O-Jays

Casting: Rob LaPlante

The Tracker

The Tracker
ArtMattan Prods.

NEW YORK -- Australian director Rolf De Heer's Outback saga "The Tracker" has the punch of a good Western with a clean and direct script plus an adventurous use of songs and folk paintings. The film's single-minded, somewhat stylized approach reminds of Clint Eastwood at his most economic and brutal -- "High Plains Drifter", for instance. "The Tracker" has no warm moments and few scenes of redemption. General audiences will probably find these raw emotions a tough watch, though critics and cineastes will certainly be impressed. The story's similarities to Philip Noyce's talked-about "Rabbit Proof Fence" could widen its boxoffice appeal.

De Heer's script tells of four very different men on the trail of an Aboriginal fugitive in 1920s Australia: The Fanatic (Gary Sweet, from De Heer's more recent "Alexandra's Project"), a racial supremacist who hates all Aborigines

the Follower (Damon Gameau), a nervy rookie policeman

the Veteran (Grant Page), an aging conscript with no stomach for his job

and the Aboriginal Tracker (David Gulpilil), who seems content to do the white men's bidding.

As the quartet range deeper into the Outback, conflicts develop. The Fanatic murders any Aborigine he comes across. These acts of violence gradually alienate him from the Follower. The Tracker, in his element, coolly manipulates the situation to his advantage and finally dispenses rough justice to the white men.

De Heer's approach to narrative is unusual. He allows folksy songs (written by Graham Tardif and sung by Archie Roach) to run at length over the images. Far from being background music, these songs elucidate both the history of the treatment of Aborigines and the feelings of the Tracker. The acts of violence are represented by Aboriginal paintings inserted into the narrative. Ian Jones' cinematography emphasizes the vastness of the land, effectively using a quick zoom -- usually the most reviled of photographic techniques -- to pick out a relevant feature or character in the Outback.

The film is unequivocal in its depiction of how the settlers sought to destroy Aboriginal life and culture.by Stephen Hopkins and Eric Bross. Hopkins, whose experience at action shows includes directing "24," brings a brisk pace and a sharp eye for composition to the first night. Bross maintains the roller-coaster ride on the second and third nights, eliciting strong but restrained performances. In particular, Koteas shines as the mysterious but dedicated agent juggling long-distance family responsibilities with a job that doesn't come with a well-defined playbook.

Vancouver fills in for Seattle thanks, in part, to geographical proximity and similar climates. Scenes of foreign locales, also shot in Vancouver, are more generic and slightly less convincing.

TRAFFIC: THE MINISERIES

USA Network

Initial Entertainment Group

Credits:

Executive producer/writer: Ron Hutchinson

Producers: Stephen Hopkins, Jay Benson

Consulting producer: Ilene Kahn Power

Directors: Stephen Hopkins, Eric Bross

Director of photography: Joel Ransom

Production designer: David Fischer

Editors: Tod Feuerman, John Duffy

Music: Jeff Rona

Art director: Don Macaulay

Set decorator: Dominique Fauguet-Lemaitre

Casting: Mary Jo Slater, Steve Brooksbank

Cast:

Adam Kadyrov: Cliff Curtis

Mike McKay: Elias Koteas

Brent Delaney: Martin Donovan

Ben Edmonds: Balthazar Getty

Carole McKay: Mary McCormack

Fazal: Ritchie Coster

Ronny Cho: Nelson Lee

Alex Edmonds: Tony Musante

Tyler McKay: Justin Chatwin

Kahn: Brian George

Angie: Jennifer Rae Westleyear="none" />Editors: William Morris, Teki Cruickshank, Adrian Herrera, Fred Hawthorne, Marc Cahill, Michael Auerbach, Brian Horn, Jeff Cooper

Host: George Gray

Starring:

Todd Santos="none" />No MPAA rating " />Shane McCutcheon: Katherine Moennig

Dana Fairbanks: Erin Daniels

Alice Pieszecki: Leisha Hailey

Kit Porter: Pam Grierppencott, David Vanacore, Mark T. Williams

Main title theme: The O-Jays

Casting: Rob LaPlante

The Amati Girls

The Amati Girls
Actress Anne DeSalvo has corralled a swell cast for her behind-the-camera feature debut, but heavy-handed scripting and unsteady di-rection make "The Amati Girls" a considerably uphill battle.

There's no shortage of heart-ache or humor in her slice of Italian-American family life, but more often than not, the portions are dished out in heaping melodramatic hunks that allow her capable performers little breathing room.

Distributed by Providence Entertainment, which had success with "The Omega Code", the picture won't make much noise in theaters before its scheduled airing on Fox Family Channel this year.

DeSalvo has obviously drawn from elements of her Philadelphia family background for her portrait of the four sisters and their widowed mother who comprise the Amati famiglia.

There's Grace (Mercedes Ruehl), the eldest, who's constantly being taken for granted by her demanding husband, Joe Paul Sorvino), much to the aggravation of sister Denise (Dinah Manoff), who always seems to be chasing another dead-end dream.

Sibling Christine (Sean Young -- yes, that Sean Young, and she appears every bit as self--conscious about trying to pass for ethnic as one would think) has separated from her workaholic hubby, Paul (Jamey Sheridan), and it's a move that doesn't sit well with widowed matriarch Dolly (Cloris Leachman), who believes in the concept of quietly accepting the cards one is dealt even as she begins making plans for her unlikely imminent funeral.

They all form an overly protective circle around the mentally challenged baby of the family, Dolores (Lily Knight), who forces them to re-examine their ap-proach when she meets her first boyfriend (Doug Spinuzza).

As one would expect from a cast that includes the likes of Ruehl, Sorvino and Leachman, there are some fine performances to be found, and it's very apparent that DeSalvo's experience as an actress points to her greatest strength as a director.

Good, too, are Knight and Manoff, while Mark Harmon does sympathetic work as Manoff's attentive beau. Manoff's real-life mom, Lee Grant, also is on hand as the colorful Aunt Splendora.

With that able a group, De-Salvo's scripting needed a much lighter touch than the weighty significance that threatens to sink every other scene.

Even more effective, airier mo-ments barely escape the overzealous attention of Conrad Pope's score, which lays on the goop thicker than a potful of pasta sauce.

THE AMATI GIRLS

Providence Entertainment

Fox Family-Providence Entertainment and Tricor Entertainment

A Triple Axel and Heritage Film Group production

An Anne DeSalvo Film

Director-screenwriter: Anne DeSalvo

Producers: James Alex, Steven C. Johnson

Executive producers: Howard Kazanjian, Craig C. Darian

Producers: Michael I. Levy, Henry M. Shea Jr.

Director of photography: Frank Byers

Production designer: Jane Stewart

Editors: C. Timothy O'Meara, David L. Bertman

Costume designer: Amy Stofsky

Music: Conrad Pope

Casting: Mary Jo Slater, Jean Scocchimarro

Color/stereo

Cast:

Grace: Mercedes Ruehl

Joe: Paul Sorvino

Dolly: Cloris Leachman

Aunt Splendora: Lee Grant

Lawrence: Mark Harmon

Christine: Sean Young

Denise: Dinah Manoff

Paul: Jamey Sheridan

Dolores: Lily Knight

Running time -- 91 minutes

MPAA rating: PG
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