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David Simon Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (1) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (5) | Trivia (2) | Personal Quotes (4)

Overview (1)

Date of Birth 1960

Mini Bio (1)

David Simon was born in 1960. He is a writer and producer, known for Homicide: Life on the Street (1993), The Wire (2002) and Treme (2010). He is married to Laura Lippman. They have one child.

Spouse (1)

Laura Lippman (? - present) (1 child)

Trade Mark (5)

Frequently collaborates with Ed Burns.
Frequently deals with complex Social Issues
Complex multiple story Arcs
Known for creating Docu Dramas which cast a neutral eye on well known Insititutions such as the Police Department,The Drug Trade and the U.S Militairy
Extensive story Arcs with frequent Callbacks

Trivia (2)

A Former Baltimore Sun crime reporter, David Simon is the author of the book, "The Corner", and is also the creator of both the Baltimore-based show, The Wire (2002), and the inspiration behind the show, Homicide: Life on the Street (1993). Simon's book, "A Year on the Killing Streets", is what the show was based upon.

Simon was known for his in-depth reporting in covering the drug trade in Baltimore in the 80s and early 90s. Simon forged relationships with police and drug dealers and local residents who he used as sources for his crime reporting and later, as references for the many true-life stories seen on The Wire (2002) and "The Corner", especially.
Father, with Laura Lippman, of a daughter.

Personal Quotes (4)

The guys we were stealing from in The Wire (2002) are the Greeks. In our heads, we're writing a Greek tragedy, but instead of the gods being petulant and jealous Olympians hurling lightning bolts down at our protagonists, it's the Postmodern institutions that are the gods. And they are gods. And no one is bigger.
(Discussing whether he hopes The Wire (2002) will cause reforms of the institutions portrayed in the series) I'll tell you what, this would be enough for me: The next time the drug czar or Ashcroft or any of these guys stands up and declares, 'With a little fine-tuning, with a few more prison cells, and a few more lawyers, a few more cops, a little better armament, and another omnibus crime bill that adds 15 more death-penalty statutes, we can win the war on drugs' -- if a slightly larger percentage of the American population looks at him and goes, 'You are so full of shit' ... that would be gratifying.
The trick to making a story matter is that every now and then, somebody you care about has to go. If it's somebody that you don't care about, then it doesn't really have - the stakes aren't there. But if you do that every now and then, then the story matters to people. And there are actual stakes involved, emotional stakes.
[in defense of the NSA surveillance program] To loudly proclaim our indignation at the maintenance of an essential and comprehensive database, while at the same time insisting on a proactive response to the inevitable attempts at terrorism is as childish as it is obtuse.

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