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1-20 of 22 items from 2004   « Prev | Next »


'Village' tops $100 million as 'Garfield' nears mark

28 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Overseas boxoffice tends to slacken at this time of the year, but two newcomers -- Shark Tale and Wimbledon -- showed early promise in kickoff dates over the weekend, while M. Night Shyamalan's The Village topped $100 million in international gross, and Garfield: The Movie is on the verge of joining the $100 million club. It was the fifth week in a row that horror thriller Village led the offshore market, scaring up $14 million from 3,872 screens in 38 territories and raising its offshore gross to $101.4 million. Garfield, set to open in Japan, reported in Sunday night with $99.8 million after picking up $5.4 million over the weekend from 2,699 screens in 19 countries. »

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'Village' fears no rival overseas

26 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Universal International Pictures enjoyed some bumper openings this weekend with Shark's Tale and Wimbledon but rival distributor Buena Vista International couldn't be spooked as The Village held on to the top spot for the fifth weekend in a row, according to weekend estimates. The Village took in about $13 million from 4,150 screens across 35 territories, pushing its cume just past the $100 million mark. This is the fifth BVI film to reach that benchmark this calendar year and also the fourth M. Night Shyamalan film to clear that figure. In Spain, the spookfest opened No. 1 with about $5 million from 404 screens, while in Korea the thriller opened with around $780,000 on 122 screens. Universal's Wimbledon debuted at No. 1 in Britain, taking 22% of the market with an estimated $3.2 million in 450 dates. »

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'Village' fears no rival overseas

26 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Universal International Pictures enjoyed some bumper openings this weekend with Shark's Tale and Wimbledon but rival distributor Buena Vista International couldn't be spooked as The Village held on to the top spot for the fifth weekend in a row, according to weekend estimates. The Village took in about $13 million from 4,150 screens across 35 territories, pushing its cume just past the $100 million mark. This is the fifth BVI film to reach that benchmark this calendar year and also the fourth M. Night Shyamalan film to clear that figure. In Spain, the spookfest opened No. 1 with about $5 million from 404 screens, while in Korea the thriller opened with around $780,000 on 122 screens. Universal's Wimbledon debuted at No. 1 in Britain, taking 22% of the market with an estimated $3.2 million in 450 dates. »

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Howard Dropped From Crowe Film

24 September 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Bryce Dallas Howard has reportedly been dropped from Australian Russell Crowe's new movie Eucalyptus, because the actor wants a co- star from his homeland. American beauty Howard - whose father is Oscar-winning director Ron Howard - was critically lauded for her role in M. Night Shyamalan thriller The Village, and was lined up to play Crowe's love interest in the film. But, according to Australian newspaper the Melbourne Sun, she was dropped because Crowe and director Jocelyn Moorhouse "want an Aussie actor, preferably unknown". »

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Italy joins the 'Spider-Man 2' fun

20 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Spider-Man 2 spun the final touches on his international web in spectacular style during the weekend, and local favorites continued to perform well, while The Village made it four straight weeks at No. 1, narrowly beating The Terminal, according to weekend estimates. Sony's Spider-Man 2 opened big in Italy, taking in about $9.6 million (including previews) from a huge release on 800 screens, marking the biggest release ever in both print numbers and dollar terms for the territory. Columbia TriStar Film Distributors International expects a record-breaking $8.3 million for the three-day weekend. Elsewhere, Spidey spun about $10 million from 1,600 prints for a cume of $390.3 million. BVI's The Village held the top spot overall for the fourth consecutive weekend, the first to achieve that mark since Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, grossing about $11.5 million for a cume of more than $80 million. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller opened at No. 1 in Mexico with about $2.8 million from 300 screens, triple its No. 2 competitor, A Cinderella Story. »

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'Open Water' tops in U.K.; 'Evil' No. 1 pick in Japan

14 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The emergence of the indie true-story thriller Open Water as the weekend boxoffice champion in the United Kingdom was the big surprise in a typical early fall overseas market, which also saw horror-action-thriller Resident Evil: Apocalypse go to the top of the chart in Japan. In a fragmented market not dominated by a tentpole release-of-the-week, M. Night Shyamalan's The Village was the outstanding performer for a third week in a row, followed by The Terminal and The Bourne Supremacy, with such titles as Dodgeball, Garfield and Alien vs. Predator among those picking up a good slice of the offshore b.o. action. Village took in $15.3 million from 3,212 screens in 30 territories, lifting the international cume to $63.2 million. Germany greeted the Buena Vista International release in the No. 1 position with $5.4 million from 754 sites. But it was No. 2 in Japan with $3.1 million from 313, beaten by No. 1 scorer Resident Evil: Apocalypse, which registered $5.9 million from 376 as part of a day-and-date bow with North America. »

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'Village' takes o'seas b.o. lead

13 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- It seems the whole world is a village. M. Night Shyamalan continued to thrill international audiences, and not even the formidable muscle of Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks could knock The Village from its third consecutive weekend in the top spot. Buena Vista International's The Village did about $14 million on 3,100 screens across 25 countries, according to weekend estimates, propelling the international cume to more than $62 million. The Joaquin Phoenix starrer opened at No. 1 in Germany with $5.4 million on 600 screens; and in Austria, the film earned $755,000 on 85 screens, including previews. In Japan, The Village opened weaker with $3.4 million on 225 screens, less than Shyamalan's Signs bow. »

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Mixed bag takes over as summer season exhausts

7 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With kids heading back to school and vacationers returning to normal work routines, the overseas boxoffice began to settle down as a batch of new entries attracted degrees of attention in a fragmented marketplace. The Terminal led the charge in the United Kingdom, Italy, Korea and Taiwan; The Village was No. 1 in Australia, Brazil, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Argentina; Garfield purred its way to the top in Spain; King Arthur overwhelmed Greece; The Chronicles of Riddick headed the boxoffice chart in Germany; Van Helsing took command in Japan; Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid hit the mark in the Philippines and Singapore; and a local film, 5x2 calculated to No. 1 in France. Top weekend honors went to M. Night Shyamalan's The Village, which took in an estimated $9.5 million from 2,052 screens in 23 countries, raising its international cume to $45 million. Village captured the No. 1 position in all seven of its new openings, according to distributor Buena Vista International, with Australia providing $2.2 million from 200, said to be 40% better that Shyamalan's Unbreakable; Brazil, $750,000 from 250; Switzerland, $655,000 from 80; and Hong Kong, $421,000 from 20. »

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Mixed bag takes over as summer season exhausts

7 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With kids heading back to school and vacationers returning to normal work routines, the overseas boxoffice began to settle down as a batch of new entries attracted degrees of attention in a fragmented marketplace. The Terminal led the charge in the United Kingdom, Italy, Korea and Taiwan; The Village was No. 1 in Australia, Brazil, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Argentina; Garfield purred its way to the top in Spain; King Arthur overwhelmed Greece; The Chronicles of Riddick headed the boxoffice chart in Germany; Van Helsing took command in Japan; Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid hit the mark in the Philippines and Singapore; and a local film, 5x2 calculated to No. 1 in France. Top weekend honors went to M. Night Shyamalan's The Village, which took in an estimated $9.5 million from 2,052 screens in 23 countries, raising its international cume to $45 million. Village captured the No. 1 position in all seven of its new openings, according to distributor Buena Vista International, with Australia providing $2.2 million from 200, said to be 40% better that Shyamalan's Unbreakable; Brazil, $750,000 from 250; Switzerland, $655,000 from 80; and Hong Kong, $421,000 from 20. »

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'Garfield' has int'l boxoffice purring

29 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Despite a narrow finish, The Village couldn't spook Garfield away from the top spot internationally this weekend. Garfield: The Movie caught about $8.9 million for Fox this weekend on 2,575 screens across 31 territories. The film opened in Russia ($718,000 on 184 screens), Hungary ($411,000 on 29) and Norway ($382,000 on 63), boosting the cume for the world's laziest cat to approximately $64.3 million. Buena Vista's The Village made another $8.5 million this weekend across 12 markets from 1,480 screens, for an estimated cume-to-date of $29.8 million. The M. Night Shyamalan film opened at No. 1 in Holland with about $1.1 million this weekend from 98 screens, more than double its nearest competitor, Fox's I, Robot. The thriller also opened at No. 1 in Sweden ($630,000 from 90 screens) and Norway ($478,000 from 60 screens). In its second week in France and the United Kingdom, The Village took in about $3.2 million from 570 screens (off 45%) and $2.8 million from 436 screens, respectively. »

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It took a 'Village' to beat 'Bourne'

23 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Buena Vista International proved they had nothing to be afraid of this weekend when The Village proved its global mettle. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller broke the suspense for BVI, opening No. 1 in the United Kingdom with an estimated $5.5 million, well ahead of its nearest competitor, The Bourne Supremacy. The Village also took $5.96 million in France, bumping the international cume to $11.9 million. Buena Vista's other major release, King Arthur, continues to surprise in international boxoffice terms, as it was once again the No. 1 picture internationally this weekend with an estimated $12.5 million and a cume of $92 million. The drama took about $3.8 million in its opening in Germany, the first to knock local favorite (T)Raumshciff Surprise from the top spot. King Arthur held the No. 1 position in Spain ($1.7 million, off 38%) and Argentina ($240,000, off 30%). »

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It took a 'Village' to beat 'Bourne'

22 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Buena Vista International proved they had nothing to be afraid of this weekend when The Village proved its global mettle. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller broke the suspense for BVI, opening No. 1 in the United Kingdom with an estimated $5.5 million, well ahead of its nearest competitor, The Bourne Supremacy. The Village also took $5.96 million in France, bumping the international cume to $11.9 million. Buena Vista's other major release, King Arthur, continues to surprise in international boxoffice terms, as it was once again the No. 1 picture internationally this weekend with an estimated $12.5 million and a cume of $92 million. The drama took about $3.8 million in its opening in Germany, the first to knock local favorite "(T)Raumshciff Surprise" from the top spot. King Arthur held the No. 1 position in Spain ($1.7 million, off 38%) and Argentina ($240,000, off 30%). »

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It took a 'Village' to beat 'Bourne'

22 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- Buena Vista International proved they had nothing to be afraid of this weekend when The Village proved its global mettle. The M. Night Shyamalan thriller broke the suspense for BVI, opening No. 1 in the United Kingdom with an estimated $5.5 million, well ahead of its nearest competitor, The Bourne Supremacy. The Village also took $5.96 million in France, bumping the international cume to $11.9 million. Buena Vista's other major release, King Arthur, continues to surprise in international boxoffice terms, as it was once again the No. 1 picture internationally this weekend with an estimated $12.5 million and a cume of $92 million. The drama took about $3.8 million in its opening in Germany, the first to knock local favorite (T)Raumshciff Surprise from the top spot. King Arthur held the No. 1 position in Spain ($1.7 million, off 38%) and Argentina ($240,000, off 30%). »

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The Village

20 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

M. Night Shyamalan's "The Village", as does much his previous work, harkens back to an earlier era of scare movies, where what you don't see is more crucial than what you do. Literate and visually expressive, "The Village" relies on the soundtrack's unsettling noises, the strangely disturbing harmony of its colors and pristine innocence of its rural setting to provoke audience goose bumps.

Unlike "The Sixth Sense", however, the film's key revelation might be too mild to jolt audiences. Some may even feel cheated. The temptation is to declare the film's main appeal will be to older audiences. Yet Shyamalan's track record argues that his own branded style of suspense connects with all sorts of audiences. "Signs", a fairly routine alien movie, brought in more than $400 million worldwide, while "Unbreakable", which most critics and even many fans deem a misfire, still attracted $249 million worldwide. Thus, "The Village" may well salvage the Walt Disney Co.'s summer.

For most of the picture, the scene never changes. The writer-director traps his viewers in a 19th century town -- press notes claim the year to be 1897, but the design and costumes make it look much older. This almost too idyllic village spreads out over fertile farmland surrounded by a stately forest. A utopian community of hard-working, God-fearing folks have settled here, far from "the towns," as they quaintly refer to the wicked world. They also have a quaint way of speaking that combines flourishes of 19th century English with a Midwestern pithiness.

There is one problem: No one ever ventures into the woods. Threatening creatures lurk there, creatures they keep at bay with a color code that banishes all things red and finds safety in yellow. Large torches light the perimeter at night and a tower watchman is always on duty.

The death of the brother of village elder August Nicholson (Brendan Gleeson) prompts the usually silent and brooding Lucius Hunt (Joaquin Phoenix) to volunteer to go beyond the boundaries to fetch emergency medicine for future use. Council head Edward Walker (William Hurt) rejects this plan, and Lucius' mother, Alice (Sigourney Weaver), can't imagine what possesses him to want to go to the towns.

Meanwhile, Edward's youngest daughter Ivy Bryce Dallas Howard), who is blind, boldly expresses her affection for the taciturn Lucius, who makes a striking contrast to her other best buddy, Noah Percy (Adrien Brody), the village simpleton, who laughs at all the wrong moments and plays rough games like a 10-year-old. As this chaste romance develops, the "truce" between the forest creatures and villagers gets broken. Signs appear on villagers' doors and livestock turn up dead and skinned but not eaten. A sense of dread sweeps the village.

The question in audience minds as the tale unfolds is where the real threat to the village lies. Is it beyond the forest boundaries, where one catches glimpses of what look like live red scarecrows? Or is it in villagers' homes, where locked strongboxes contain "secrets" from the elders' pasts?

Working with cinematographer Roger Deakins, Shyamalan favors simple camera compositions and little cutting, which allows actors to carry the day. And the one who gradually emerges to do so is Howard. Ivy becomes the story's emotional center. In a village where reticence is the norm, this live wire turns her affliction to her advantage and learns how to read emotions with her other senses. The young, theater-trained actress, who is Ron Howard's daughter, gives the role plenty of spunk but lets her vulnerability show through when she reaches the limits of her bravery.

Brody lends exasperating sweetness to his mentally unstable young man, while Phoenix is his exact opposite, so in control of his emotions that he appears not to have any. Hurt is the village's spiritual force, kind and forgiving yet fierce in his devotion to the community. As the widow Hunt, Weaver manages to suggest the mischievous woman she once was even as she plays her role as a village "elder." Gleeson is fine as always but feels underutilized in a role that lacks real dimension.

Designer Tom Foden's art department has expertly constructed 20 buildings on the 40-acre town site, creating a bucolic paradise. Ann Roth's earthy but surprisingly rich costumes indicate that this village must possess some pretty mean seamstresses. James Newton Howard's score becomes overwrought at times, but the dire tones do suit the mood.

THE VILLAGE

Buena Vista Pictures

Touchstone Pictures presentsa Blinding Edge Pictures/Scott Rudin production

Credits:

Writer-director: M. Night Shyamalan

Producers: Scott Rudin, Sam Mercer, M. Night Shyamalan

Director of photography: Roger Deakins

Production designer: Tom Foden

Music: James Newton Howard

Costume designer: Ann Roth

Editor: Christopher Tellefsen

Cast:

Lucius Hunt: Joaquin Phoenix

Noah Percy: Adrien Brody

Ivy Walker: Bryce Dallas Howard

Edward Walker: William Hurt

Alice Hunt: Sigourney Weaver

August Nicholson: Brendan Gleeson

MPAA rating: PG-13

Running time -- 107 minutes »

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Disney and Shyamalan Face Plagiarism Lawsuit

11 August 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Writer-director M. Night Shyamalan and The Walt Disney Co. are bracing themselves for legal action, after a children's author declared similarities between her book and new movie The Village. The Village, the latest thriller by Shyamalan, stars Joaquin Phoenix, Sigourney Weaver and Adrien Brody and has proved to be a hit at the American office. But now that much-needed success - Disney has endured a string of flops this year - has been marred by publisher Simon & Schuster Inc's announcement it is reviewing its legal options against the company and Shyamalan. Last week, reports circulated that The Village's plot and surprise ending were parallel to Margaret Peterson Haddix's first book Running Out Of Time, published in 1995. Haddix says she heard about the similarities last week when fans - and then journalists - began calling and emailing her and her publisher to ask if she had sold the book to Shyamalan. She claims she has never spoken to Shyamalan or to Disney, adding, "It's certainly an interesting situation. I'm just examining what my options are." A joint statement from Disney and Shyamalan's Blinding Edge Pictures says: "(We) believe these claims to be meritless". Simon & Schuster spokeswoman Tracy Van Straaten adds, "This is a children's book that sold more than half a million copies and won prizes, so it's not an obscure book for us." Shyamalan has previously battled a copyright lawsuit brought by a Pennsylvania screenwriter who claimed the plot from his 2002 film Signs mirrored his unpublished script Lord Of The Barrens. »

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It takes a 'Village' for BV to take top boxoffice spot

3 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

In a performance similar to that of 2002, M. Night Shyamalan's summer film proved a much-needed blockbuster for its struggling distributor, Buena Vista. As Signs proved to be Buena Vista's first hit of 2002 with its $60.1 million opening, so does The Village win the title of savior after Disney's distribution company suffered through an entire year without a No. 1 hit. The 19th century thriller grasped audiences over the weekend, generating $50.7 million -- the first hit for Buena Vista since the Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl opened last July. On 3,730 theaters, the film earned an impressive per-theater average of $13,605. The more closely watched battle this past weekend was between Paramount Pictures' The Manchurian Candidate and last weekend's big winner, Universal Pictures' The Bourne Supremacy. The holdover came through in the clutch, pulling in an additional $24.1 million. The Matt Damon-starring sequel has now earned $98.8 million in 10 days of release. »

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Final boxoffice: 'Village' leads with $50.7 million

2 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Four new wide releases were thrown into an already crowded marketplace this weekend, but Buena Vista's The Village, from director M. Night Shyamalan, blasted through the boxoffice gridlock to firmly establish itself in the top spot. Village generated $50.7 million, the second-biggest opening for Shyamalan after the $60.1 million debut of Signs in 2002, according to Monday's final figures. The opening of Village also ended a long drought for Buena Vista, marking the first time in more than a year that the distributor had a film in first place. The last time Buena Vista had a film in the top spot was July 2003 with Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. In the battle for second place, Universal's The Bourne Supremacy edged out Paramount's The Manchurian Candidate, with $24.2 million, down 54% from its debut. With both films aiming at a similar demographic, Bourne was expected to take a hit this weekend. The Matt Damon starrer has taken $98.8 million in 10 days. Candidate debuted with enough votes to land in the third slot, collecting $20 million. The Denzel Washington starrer, from director Jonathan Demme, opened in the area expected heading into the frame. »

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Shyamalan's 'Village' leads boxoffice

2 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Four new wide releases were thrown into an already crowded marketplace this weekend, but Buena Vista's The Village, from director M. Night Shyamalan, blasted through the boxoffice gridlock to firmly establish itself in the top spot. Village generated an estimated $50.8 million, the second-biggest opening for Shyamalan after the $60.1 million debut of Signs in 2002. The opening of Village also ended a long drought for Buena Vista, marking the first time in more than a year that the distributor had a film in first place. The last time Buena Vista had a film in the top spot was July 2003 with Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. In the battle for second place, Universal's The Bourne Supremacy just edged out Paramount's The Manchurian Candidate, with an estimated $23.4 million, down 56% from its debut. With both films aiming at a similar demographic, Bourne was expected to take a hit this weekend. The Matt Damon starrer has taken an estimated $98 million in 10 days. Candidate debuted with enough votes to land in the third slot, collecting an estimated $20.2 million. The Denzel Washington starrer, from director Jonathan Demme, opened in the area expected heading into the frame. »

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Boxoffice preview: Creepy journey to 'Village' green

1 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

It's genre weekend at the multiplex, where there is a choice for everyone. Whether it's suspense, politics, comedy or children's fare, the boxoffice is open for business. For only the second time this summer, four studios are bringing out wide national releases with the hope that there is enough differentiation for all of them to score well with audiences. The weekend's top film is likely to be M. Night Shyamalan's The Village from Buena Vista Pictures, but Paramount Pictures' political drama The Manchurian Candidate, New Line Cinema's stoner comedy Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle and Universal Pictures' family film Thunderbirds are all clamoring for their share of the pie. The Village is out to test the brand-name appeal of its writer-director. Shyamalan has become a franchise unto himself with his past three movies. But this time around, the Indian-born thriller buff reaches out to audiences without the help of the significant star power that marked his previous entries. Shyamalan scored his biggest opening in 2002 with Signs, which opened to $60.1 million during the first weekend in August and marked Buena Vista's first hit of that year. The Walt Disney Co.'s distribution outlet is hoping for the same phenomenon this time around, as the studio has struggled at the boxoffice this year. »

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Shyamalan's 'Village' leads boxoffice

1 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Four new wide releases were thrown into an already crowded marketplace this weekend, but Buena Vista's The Village, from director M. Night Shyamalan, blasted through the boxoffice gridlock to firmly establish itself in the top spot. Village generated an estimated $50.8 million, the second-biggest opening for Shyamalan after the $60.1 million debut of Signs in 2002. The opening of Village also ended a long drought for Buena Vista, marking the first time in more than a year that the distributor had a film in first place. The last time Buena Vista had a film in the top spot was July 2003 with Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. In the battle for second place, Universal's The Bourne Supremacy just edged out Paramount's The Manchurian Candidate, with an estimated $23.4 million, down 56% from its debut. With both films aiming at a similar demographic, Bourne was expected to take a hit this weekend. The Matt Damon starrer has taken an estimated $98 million in 10 days. Candidate debuted with enough votes to land in the third slot, collecting an estimated $20.2 million. The Denzel Washington starrer, from director Jonathan Demme, opened in the area expected heading into the frame. »

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1-20 of 22 items from 2004   « Prev | Next »


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