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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 42 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


‘Search Party’ Ep & Cast On Generation Divide And How Funny & Scary Coexist – TCA

31 July 2016 7:24 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

TBS' new mystery-comedy Search Party examines a group of self-absorbed millennials who find themselves drawn down a dangerous rabbit hole when a former acquaintance goes missing. At today's TCA panel on the show, executive producers Lilly Burns, Sarah-Violet Bliss, Charles Rogers and Michael Showalter attempted to explain how funny and scary can exist in one show. "The balance between the two heightens both," said Burns. She said the mystery is more compelling because it… »

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Anna Akana: How the Star of ‘Miss 2059’ Is Turning Online Fame Into an Empire (Exclusive Clip)

29 July 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“We all need to be someone’s Margaret Cho,” said Anna Akana, in a speech she delivered accepting an award celebrating Asians in entertainment.

Akana cited Cho’s career as the inspiration behind her own impressive one as actress, comedian, writer and producer — which all stems from her 1.5 million YouTube subscribers.  “It is all thanks to seeing that one face on the screen that looked like mine.”

“The most you can do is try to affect change in the work you create,” Akana told IndieWire at VidCon last month. “We all have to band together and start demanding those changes.”

Read More: YouTube’s Dilemma: Why Online Stars Struggle to Make Good Movies

Akana is proud to say that “Miss 2059” — the short form web series she developed with New Form Digital for Go90 — features only one white male actor. “Almost every person on screen is a person of color. »

- Jude Dry

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By Avoiding Violent Movies, We May Also Be Avoiding the Truth — Critic’s Notebook

25 June 2016 11:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A few days after Omar Mateen murdered 49 people in a gay nightclub in Florida, Universal Pictures canceled a press junket for “The Purge: Election Year,” the latest in a dystopian horror franchise in which lunatics butcher helpless civilians. From a marketing perspective, it’s hard to argue with that decision: When tales of real-life violence dominate the airwaves, no one wants to promote a fictional alternative.

At the same time, that moment may represent a lost opportunity. Yes, the junket participants would be forced to cope with a barrage of questions about the impact of glorified killing in popular culture. However, that also might have created an essential dialogue that can only progress when people are willing to engage in it.

In an editorial for Variety, director Michael Showalter accused Hollywood of contributing “to an overall culture of violence that affects our society in negative ways.” Others may see it differently: Hollywood exploits violence, »

- Eric Kohn

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Michael Showalter: How Hollywood Contributes to a Culture of Violence (Guest Column)

15 June 2016 3:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After the worst shooting in U.S. history that left 49 people dead in an Orlando nightclub, writer-director Michael Showalter has been questioning what role Hollywood plays in the culture of violence and if the industry should be more careful about the images that appear in movies, TV shows and video games. Variety asked Showalter (“Wet Hot American Summer”) to expand on those thoughts in a guest column.

I wrote a tweet on Sunday. It said, “Feeling angry at everyone including Hollywood movies that glorify violence. Liberal actors shooting guns left and right.
 Hypocritical.” Many responders accused me of laying blame on the wrong culprit. Of course the real culprit is the person who pulls the trigger, but I am angry. I am angry and looking everywhere for answers. Above all, I believe that gun control is an absolute imperative if we are to have any chance of survival as a civil society. But I do also believe that Hollywood films, television and video games contribute to an overall culture of violence that affects our society in negative ways.

As filmmakers, where do we draw our own lines? What kind of messages do we want to send? Shooting guns at people means something different today than it did 20 years ago, 10 years ago, 5 years ago, last week.

I do not in any way subscribe to the notion that being continually subjected to images of graphic violence has no affect on our collective psyche. Just as our society is inundated with images that objectify women, we are inundated with images that glorify and fetishize gun violence. Can there be any doubt that these images have a cumulative effect on us?

People also responded that my tweet was an attack on the First Amendment. The First Amendment does not require us to say whatever we want without regard for the effects that it will have. To me, having freedom carries with it the obligation to use the freedom responsibly. Just because we Can do something does not mean that we Should. We can censor ourselves if we believe that doing so has value. We can hold ourselves accountable.

If we say we are against the exploitation of women are we not being hypocritical if we exploit women in our films? If we say we are against the marginalization of minorities are we not being hypocritical if we marginalize them in our films? If we say we are opposed to gun violence are we not being hypocritical when we glorify gun violence in our movies? Are we sending the message that guns are cool? Just like the old days of Bogey, James Dean and Cary Grant smoking cigarettes.

I am not in any way suggesting that we stop making action films, or stop depicting violence, or pretend that guns do not exist, or that Quentin Tarantino should start making rom-coms. I am only saying that we acknowledge that things have changed. The country needs to do something. Can we be part of the solution?

»

- Michael Showalter

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After Orlando Shooting, Hollywood Faces Tough Conversation About Violence

14 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Tony Awards on Sunday night were a muted affair, held just hours after a mass shooting in a gay club left 50 people dead in Orlando, Fla.

“It’s quite important that in these situations, we in the arts keep going,” composer Andrew Lloyd Webber told Variety at a Tony after-party at New York’s Baccarat Hotel, adding that he’d just attended a late-night celebration for his musical “School of Rock” with the cast’s young actors. “I came away with one thought,” he said. “No child is born to hate.”

The entertainment industry is still grappling with the implications of the Orlando massacre, the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. On Twitter and elsewhere, celebrities expressed an outpouring of grief. J.K. Rowling posted a photo of victim Luis Vielma, 22, wearing his Hogwarts uniform as an employee at Universal Studios working at the “Harry Potter” ride. “I can’t stop crying,” she wrote. Writer-director Michael Showalter said he was angry at Hollywood for glorifying violence: “Just stop it. The videogames. The movies. All of it.” Ellen Page talked about how the gay community “must stand together more than ever.”

Kelly Bush Novak, founder and CEO of ID PR, and a gay rights advocate, told Variety she hopes the tragedy will have a galvanizing effect. “The victims in Orlando paid for their freedom with their lives,” Novak said. “Ours is the civil rights struggle of the 21st century. As agents of cultural change we must honor the lives of all Lgbtq people by telling stories that turn fear into pride for our youth, and that allow us to be seen in all of our diverse and powerful glory.”

“People go to the movies for escapism, but it’s hard to escape something like this.” Analyst Jeff Bock

From Aurora to Newtown, after each mass shooting, Hollywood faces difficult conversations about its role in an increasingly dangerous world — one in which killers, warped by religious fundamentalism or mental illness, rely on easy access to assault weapons to end dozens of lives in a blink of an eye. This year alone, there has been a mass shooting on 133 of 164 days.

Each cycle of violence raises questions about people’s willingness to leave their homes to see movies, concerts, or plays. The murders in Orlando by a lone gunman, Omar Mateen, who was killed by police, may have lasting repercussions.

“At some point there’s a tipping point,” said Howard Levinson, a security consultant for schools, movie theaters, and businesses. He noted that assault-rifle-wielding police officers are now a common sight in France and other parts of Europe following last fall’s terrorist attacks in Paris. In the days leading up to the Cannes Film Festival, officials staged an elaborate standoff with gunmen to look for lapses in their emergency responsiveness. It’s a tactic that is already being embraced by sports stadiums. Officials and police at Boston’s Fenway Park, for instance, engaged in a mock counterterrorism exercise June 12, complete with fake gunshots and explosions. Levinson predicts such preparations could soon be the standard at major public venues.

“It’s a different world,” he said. “The term ‘active shooter’ barely existed 20 or 30 years ago. Now it’s on the tip of nearly everybody’s tongue.”

Theaters have not yet been required to install metal detectors and armed guards, but the movie business has made some moves to deal with the frightening new reality. Following the 2012 shooting at a late-night showing of “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colo., that left 12 dead and 70 injured, studios began moving preview screenings to as early as 8 p.m. out of safety concerns. Many major theater chains, such as AMC and Regal, tightened their costume policies, barring guests from bringing fake weapons or wearing masks.

Privately, studio executives said they did not expect the Orlando nightclub shooting to keep people away from movie theaters. Even in cases where theaters themselves have been the scene of murders, the aftershocks have been limited, and largely regional; ticket sales have dipped primarily in areas close to the crime scene, they said. But the steady stream of such events is bound to have a psychological impact on audiences.

‘Senseless Acts of Tragedy’: Lin-Manuel Miranda recited an emotional sonnet as part of an acceptance speech for “Hamilton” during the Tony Awards June 12 in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

“People go to the movies for escapism, but it’s hard to escape something like this,” said Jeff Bock, a box office analyst with Exhibitor Relations. “Every time you’re at a movie or a sporting event or gathering, it’s going to creep up into the back of people’s minds.”

Nightclubs will feel a financial pinch analogous to the one suffered by airlines in the wake of the 9/11 attacks when ridership declined, security consultants said. “Let’s call it the night-time economy, the businesses that exist between 6 pm. and 3 a.m. They will be impacted by an immediate panic,” predicted Robert C. Smith, CEO of Nightclub Security Consultants. “People will not go out.”

Smith believes metal detectors, which can cost in excess of $200,000 and require trained staffers to oversee them, could be prohibitively expensive for small venues. However, he says, clubs may be mandated to add training for bouncers on how to deal with shooters.

In addition to the prohibitive costs of high-tech security measures, the inconspicuous profiles of the killers themselves make preventing the next big attack nearly impossible. The internet has enabled shooters to become radicalized into extreme views, while also providing them access to information about building arsenals. Such potential killers typically have limited criminal records, making it difficult to track their moves.

“A lot of times they’re flying under the radar, and there’s not much indication they’re going to perpetrate an attack,” said Jeffrey Simon, author of “Lone Wolf Terrorism: Understanding the Growing Threat.” “We’re living in an age where a lone-wolf terrorist, whatever their motivation, has an advantage over people trying to prevent an attack.”

At the Tonys, the “Hamilton” cast felt bittersweet emotions about winning 11 awards at a time of national tragedy. In the pressroom, creator and star Lin-Manuel Miranda told reporters that the Lgbt community is the “cornerstone” of the theater industry. The evening was the culmination of seven years of work, he said, but such shootings are a reminder that life can be snuffed out in an instant.

“You have tragic acts like today when you realize that tomorrow is not promised,” said Miranda. It was a moment of reflection that carried throughout the Tonys broadcast. Even the show’s final number, “The Schuyler Sisters,” seemed to double as a eulogy with the poignant lyric: “Look around, look around at how lucky we are to be alive right now.”

»

- Brent Lang and Ramin Setoodeh

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After Orlando Shooting, Hollywood Faces Tough Conversation About Violence

14 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Tony Awards on Sunday night were a muted affair, held just hours after a mass shooting in a gay club left 50 people dead in Orlando, Fla.

“It’s quite important that in these situations, we in the arts keep going,” composer Andrew Lloyd Webber told Variety at a Tony after-party at New York’s Baccarat Hotel, adding that he’d just attended a late-night celebration for his musical “School of Rock” with the cast’s young actors. “I came away with one thought,” he said. “No child is born to hate.”

The entertainment industry is still grappling with the implications of the Orlando massacre, the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. On Twitter and elsewhere, celebrities expressed an outpouring of grief. J.K. Rowling posted a photo of victim Luis Vielma, 22, wearing his Hogwarts uniform as an employee at Universal Studios working at the “Harry Potter” ride. “I can’t stop crying,” she wrote. Writer-director Michael Showalter said he was angry at Hollywood for glorifying violence: “Just stop it. The videogames. The movies. All of it.” Ellen Page talked about how the gay community “must stand together more than ever.”

Kelly Bush Novak, founder and CEO of ID PR, and a gay rights advocate, told Variety she hopes the tragedy will have a galvanizing effect. “The victims in Orlando paid for their freedom with their lives,” Novak said. “Ours is the civil rights struggle of the 21st century. As agents of cultural change we must honor the lives of all Lgbtq people by telling stories that turn fear into pride for our youth, and that allow us to be seen in all of our diverse and powerful glory.”

“People go to the movies for escapism, but it’s hard to escape something like this.” Analyst Jeff Bock

From Aurora to Newtown, after each mass shooting, Hollywood faces difficult conversations about its role in an increasingly dangerous world — one in which killers, warped by religious fundamentalism or mental illness, rely on easy access to assault weapons to end dozens of lives in a blink of an eye. This year alone, there has been a mass shooting on 133 of 164 days.

Each cycle of violence raises questions about people’s willingness to leave their homes to see movies, concerts, or plays. The murders in Orlando by a lone gunman, Omar Mateen, who was killed by police, may have lasting repercussions.

“At some point there’s a tipping point,” said Howard Levinson, a security consultant for schools, movie theaters, and businesses. He noted that assault-rifle-wielding police officers are now a common sight in France and other parts of Europe following last fall’s terrorist attacks in Paris. In the days leading up to the Cannes Film Festival, officials staged an elaborate standoff with gunmen to look for lapses in their emergency responsiveness. It’s a tactic that is already being embraced by sports stadiums. Officials and police at Boston’s Fenway Park, for instance, engaged in a mock counterterrorism exercise June 12, complete with fake gunshots and explosions. Levinson predicts such preparations could soon be the standard at major public venues.

“It’s a different world,” he said. “The term ‘active shooter’ barely existed 20 or 30 years ago. Now it’s on the tip of nearly everybody’s tongue.”

Theaters have not yet been required to install metal detectors and armed guards, but the movie business has made some moves to deal with the frightening new reality. Following the 2012 shooting at a late-night showing of “The Dark Knight Rises” in Aurora, Colo., that left 12 dead and 70 injured, studios began moving preview screenings to as early as 8 p.m. out of safety concerns. Many major theater chains, such as AMC and Regal, tightened their costume policies, barring guests from bringing fake weapons or wearing masks.

Privately, studio executives said they did not expect the Orlando nightclub shooting to keep people away from movie theaters. Even in cases where theaters themselves have been the scene of murders, the aftershocks have been limited, and largely regional; ticket sales have dipped primarily in areas close to the crime scene, they said. But the steady stream of such events is bound to have a psychological impact on audiences.

‘Senseless Acts of Tragedy’: Lin-Manuel Miranda recited an emotional sonnet as part of an acceptance speech for “Hamilton” during the Tony Awards June 12 in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

“People go to the movies for escapism, but it’s hard to escape something like this,” said Jeff Bock, a box office analyst with Exhibitor Relations. “Every time you’re at a movie or a sporting event or gathering, it’s going to creep up into the back of people’s minds.”

Nightclubs will feel a financial pinch analogous to the one suffered by airlines in the wake of the 9/11 attacks when ridership declined, security consultants said. “Let’s call it the night-time economy, the businesses that exist between 6 pm. and 3 a.m. They will be impacted by an immediate panic,” predicted Robert C. Smith, CEO of Nightclub Security Consultants. “People will not go out.”

Smith believes metal detectors, which can cost in excess of $200,000 and require trained staffers to oversee them, could be prohibitively expensive for small venues. However, he says, clubs may be mandated to add training for bouncers on how to deal with shooters.

In addition to the prohibitive costs of high-tech security measures, the inconspicuous profiles of the killers themselves make preventing the next big attack nearly impossible. The internet has enabled shooters to become radicalized into extreme views, while also providing them access to information about building arsenals. Such potential killers typically have limited criminal records, making it difficult to track their moves.

“A lot of times they’re flying under the radar, and there’s not much indication they’re going to perpetrate an attack,” said Jeffrey Simon, author of “Lone Wolf Terrorism: Understanding the Growing Threat.” “We’re living in an age where a lone-wolf terrorist, whatever their motivation, has an advantage over people trying to prevent an attack.”

At the Tonys, the “Hamilton” cast felt bittersweet emotions about winning 11 awards at a time of national tragedy. In the pressroom, creator and star Lin-Manuel Miranda told reporters that the Lgbt community is the “cornerstone” of the theater industry. The evening was the culmination of seven years of work, he said, but such shootings are a reminder that life can be snuffed out in an instant.

“You have tragic acts like today when you realize that tomorrow is not promised,” said Miranda. It was a moment of reflection that carried throughout the Tonys broadcast. Even the show’s final number, “The Schuyler Sisters,” seemed to double as a eulogy with the poignant lyric: “Look around, look around at how lucky we are to be alive right now.”

»

- Brent Lang and Ramin Setoodeh

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Hello, My Name is Doris

6 June 2016 8:29 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Sally Field bounces back in this story of mismatched love - or a romantic delusion... that is 3/4 charm and 1/4 wishful thinking. The May-October romance isn't an outright farce like Harold and Maude, so a few of the comic situations are somewhat wince-inducing. Or am I just feeling my own 'October' discomfort? Field fans should love it anyway. Hello, My Name Is Doris Blu-ray Sony Pictures Home Entertainment 2015 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 90 min. / Street Date June 14, 2016 / 26.99 Starring Sally Field, Max Greenfield, Tyne Daly, Beth Behrs, Elisabeth Reaser, Peter Gallagher, Stephen Root, Wendi McLendon-Covey. Cinematography Brian Burgoyne Film Editor Robert Nassau Original Music Brian H. Kim Written by Laura Terruso, Michael Showalter, from her short film Doris & the Intern Produced by Daniel Crown, Kevin Mann, Riva Marker, Jordana Mollick, Daniela Taplin Lundberg Directed by Michael Showalter

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I've always liked Sally Field. Her personality made a dumb 'sixties TV show »

- Glenn Erickson

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New to Streaming: ’10 Cloverfield Lane,’ Wim Wenders Road Trilogy, ‘Eternal Sunshine,’ and More

3 June 2016 8:20 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place »

- The Film Stage

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Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later limited series followup coming to Netflix, watch the announcement trailer here

28 April 2016 8:05 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

We all know what happened on the last day of camp back in the summer of ‘81. Come to think of it, we also know what went down on the very first day at Camp Firewood. Many of us have been wondering what ever came of Beth, Coop, McKinley, Ben, Susie, Andy, Gail, Lindsay, Neil, Katie, Victor, J.J., Gary, Gene, Henry Newman and the rest of the crew. Well, wonder no more, as Netflix has just ordered up a new installment of the Wet Hot American Summer series entitled Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later.

Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later is the sequel to the prequel of the 2001 cult comedy film Wet Hot American Summer, written by Michael Showalter and David Wain and directed by the latter. The 2015 eight-episode series prequel Wet Hot American Summer: First Day Of Camp must have been a success with »

- William Fanelli

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Netflix Announces 'Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later'

27 April 2016 12:54 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Finally, fans can make it their beeswax to see what happens to their favorite campers and counselors ten years after the original film in a new Netflix original series Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later. The series will include eight all-new 30-minute episodes and is set to premiere in 2017.

The series will be written by Michael Showalter and David Wain and Wain will direct. Executive Producers for "Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later" are Michael Showalter, David Wain, Peter Principato, Jonathan Stern and Howard Bernstein.

Check out the video below.

Kellvin Chavez Rt @LRNews: First Clip From 'X-men: Apocalypse' Tells Us Who En Sabah Nur Is https://t.co/YrJphFH8ss #Xmen #XMenApocalypse https://t.co/lkVDeM9DAr about 21 minutes ago »

- Kellvin Chavez

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Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later Set to Premiere on Netflix in 2017

27 April 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

You may want to make it your beeswax to tune in for this. The Camp Firewood counselors are finally making good on a promise they made in the 2001 cult-classic comedy Wet Hot American Summer and are meeting up 10 years after their last day at camp.That's right, Netflix has announced that there will be an eight-episode series entitled Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later.The series comes after 2015's star-studded prequel series Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, which starred original Wet Hot stars Amy Poehler, Elizabeth Banks, Paul Rudd, Christopher Meloni, Molly Shannon, Janeane Garofalo, »

- Patrick Gomez, @PatrickGomezLA

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Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later Set to Premiere on Netflix in 2017

27 April 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

You may want to make it your beeswax to tune in for this. The Camp Firewood counselors are finally making good on a promise they made in the 2001 cult-classic comedy Wet Hot American Summer and are meeting up 10 years after their last day at camp.That's right, Netflix has announced that there will be an eight-episode series entitled Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later.The series comes after 2015's star-studded prequel series Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, which starred original Wet Hot stars Amy Poehler, Elizabeth Banks, Paul Rudd, Christopher Meloni, Molly Shannon, Janeane Garofalo, »

- Patrick Gomez, @PatrickGomezLA

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Netflix Gives Go-Ahead For Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later

27 April 2016 11:42 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Summer camp beckons for Netflix subscribers once more only this time, the streaming platform will be checking in on our favorite happy campers a full decade after the original film. Yes, Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later is officially on course to premiere on Netflix sometime in 2017 – likely around the July timeframe – and you better make it your beeswax to be there on time.

Comprising eight all-new episodes based around Camp Firewood and all the shenanigans therein, it’s understood that Ten Years Later isn’t being considered as a direct sequel to First Day of Camp, last year’s miniseries that brought together the likes of Amy Poehler, Paul Rudd and Bradley Cooper. That trio was just a small portion of the cast that headlined David Wain’s cult original when it graced screens in 2001.

Alas, there’s no word yet on the ensemble that will be »

- Michael Briers

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Netflix announces sequel series Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later

27 April 2016 11:07 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

For those of you who enjoyed the return of Wet Hot American Summer in series form, Netflix has just announced a sequel series, aptly titled Ten Years Later. As you can imagine, this time around we'll actually travel to the the time that was teased in the original film. You can relive that moment with the announcement trailer below. Film creators David Wain and Michael Showalter, who... Read More »

- Sean Wist

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Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later Is Coming to Netflix in 2017

27 April 2016 10:11 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

'Let's all promise that in ten years from today, we'll meet again, and we'll see what kind of people we've blossomed into.' Those were the immortal words spoken by Ben at the end of the classic comedy Wet Hot American Summer. Now, ten years later, we will truly get to see what kind of people they have become as Netflix announces Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later.

Finally, fans can make it their beeswax to see what happens to their favorite campers and counselors a decade after the original film in a new Netflix original series. Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later will include eight all-new 30-minute episodes. The anticipated comedy is set to premiere in 2017.

The series will be written by Michael Showalter and David Wain. Wain, who directed the original Wet Hot American Summer movie way back in 2001, will return to direct. Executive »

- MovieWeb

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'Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later' Hits Netflix in 2017

27 April 2016 9:42 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

One year after reviving cult comedy Wet Hot American Summer with prequel series First Day of Camp, Netflix is revisiting the wacky Camp Firewood with sequel Ten Years Later. Set one decade after the events of the 2001 film – which chronicled the last day of a fictional Maine summer camp in 1981 – the eight-episode, 30-minute show will premiere in 2017. 

"Let's all promise that 10 years from today, we'll meet again and see what kind of people we've blossomed into," Ben (Bradley Cooper) tells his campmates in a teaser video. His request builds into »

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Netflix Announces Second ‘Wet Hot American Summer’ Series Set 10 Years After Cult Film

27 April 2016 9:32 AM, PDT | Tubefilter.com | See recent Tubefilter News news »

Netflix will travel into the future for a Wet Hot American Summer sequel taking place ten years after the conclusion of the cult film, which was originally set in 1981.

The forthcoming series, titled Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later, will comprise eight 30-minute episodes and debuts in 2017. Check out a teaser below, featuring a scene from the original film in which the group of counselors -- as played by Bradley Cooper, Amy Poehler, and more -- promises to reunite exactly 10 years after their last day at camp.

Last year, Netflix debuted a series titled Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, which served as a prequel to the film. Subsequently, co-creator and co-star Michael Showalter said that more episodes were definitely possible -- though rounding up the star-studded cast of the original film, which the team has presumably done for Ten Years later, is no small feat. »

- Geoff Weiss

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Netflix's 'Wet Hot American Summer' Will Return in 2017, But 10 Years Later

27 April 2016 8:48 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

How will the "Wet Hot American Summer" gang look in 1991? We'll find out in the second season on Netflix, this time following everyone 10 years after the events of the film and Season 1.

This all started as a 2001 movie, set on the last day of camp in 1981, which slowly became a cult classic comedy. In 2015, Netflix brought back the cast for "Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp," the hilarious prequel starring actors who were nearly 15 years older.

Now they're doing something that, age-wise, makes more sense: "Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later," a series of eight 30-minute episodes set in 1991, and scheduled to arrive in 2017. (We should probably expect an unhealthy dose of grunge and teen spirit.)

According to Netflix, David Wain and Michael Showalter will return as writers, with Wain also directing. There are no cast details at this point, but this series announcement video from »

- Gina Carbone

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'Wet Hot American Summer' is returning to Netflix ... 10 years later

27 April 2016 7:45 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Wet Hot American Summer isn't done with Netflix yet. Following last year's return to Camp Firewood with the eight-part series Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, we're going to jump forward in time for "Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later," the streaming platform announced today. Every Wet Hot fan knows that the counselors were always planning to meet up for a 10-year reunion, starting at 9 so everyone could be there by 9:30. We got a very brief glimpse of it at the end of the movie, and now Netflix is going to give us so much more.  Just like First Day, there will be eight episodes, written by Michael Showalter and David Wain and directed by Wain. Hopefully they'll be able to convince the cast to return, too, but Netflix hasn't said who is signed on to star (the video announcement simply showed a clip from »

- Sara Morrison

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Netflix Lines Up 'Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later'

27 April 2016 7:29 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

When you have $5 billion dollars in your pocket earmarked for original content, you can indulge in off the beaten path fare, and Netflix are gearing up to make fans of the cult comedy "Wet Hot American Summer" happy (again). After launching "Wet Hot American Summer: First Day Of Camp" last year, they're gearing up another return to Camp Firewood. Read More: Review: 'Wet Hot American Summer: First Day Of Camp' The network has announced "Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later," which as you've probably guessed from the title, will be set a decade after the 2001 movie, fulfilling the promise made by Bradley Cooper's Ben that was made at the end of that film for the gang to reunite.  There's no word yet on who will return, but given that David Wain and Michael Showalter were able to get the principal players back for 'First Day Of Camp, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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