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The Crimson Kimono

Another great Samuel Fuller film on Blu-ray — this one is a crime tale set in downtown Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo, that forms an interracial romantic triangle. It’s risky for its year because of the sexual dynamics — a Japanese-American man falls in love with a Caucasian woman. Fuller’s approach is years ahead of its time, even if Columbia’s sales job was a little weird.

The Crimson Kimono

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1959 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 81 min. / Street Date July 18, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Victoria Shaw, Glenn Corbett, James Shigeta, Anna Lee, Paul Dubov, Jaclynne Greene, Neyle Morrow, Gloria Pall, , Barbara Hayden, George Yoshinaga.

Cinematography: Sam Leavitt

Film Editor: Jerome Thoms

Original Music: Harry Sukman

Written, Produced and Directed by Samuel Fuller

“What was his strange appeal for American girls?”

Believe it or not, there was once a time when Samuel Fuller was a fringe figure,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Yakuza

The Yakuza

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 & 123 min. / Street Date February 14, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Robert Mitchum, Takakura Ken, Brian Keith, Eiji Okada, Richard Jordan, Keiko Kishi, James Shigeta, Herb Edelman.

Cinematography: Kozo Okazaki, Duke Callaghan

Production Design: Stephen Grimes

Art Direction: Yoshiyuki Ishida

Film Editor: Don Guidice, Thomas Stanford

Original Music: Dave Grusin

Written by: Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader, Robert Towne

Produced by: Michael Hamilburg, Sydney Pollack, Koji Shundo

Directed by Sydney Pollack

The Warner Archive Collection is on a roll with a 2017 schedule that has so far released one much-desired library Blu-ray per week. Coming shortly are Vincente Minnelli’s Bells are Ringing, Billy Wilder’s Love in the Afternoon Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend and Val Guest’s When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth, and that only takes us through February. First up is a piercing action drama from 1975.

There are favorite movies around Savant central,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

15 Baddest Santas in Movies and TV

15 Baddest Santas in Movies and TV
Let’s face it, there’s always been something slightly suspicious about Santa Claus. Despite his jolly reputation, the fact that he spies on people while they’re sleeping, and then breaks into their homes in the middle of the night, makes Kris Kringle a bit of a creep when you get right down to it. As the raunchy comedy “Bad Santa 2” arrives in theaters, here are some of the nastiest, naughtiest, and most nauseating Santas in movies and TV.

Related storiesBenedict Cumberbatch to Voice the Grinch in 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas'NBC Nabs 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas,' Renews 'American Ninja Warrior'James Shigeta, Star of 'Flower Drum Song' and 'Die Hard' Co-Star, Dies at 81
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscars: Joan Rivers Left Out of In Memoriam Tribute

Oscars: Joan Rivers Left Out of In Memoriam Tribute
The Academy Awards’ “In Memoriam” segment offered an egalitarian salute to a broad range of industry figures who died during the past 12 months.

The segment presented by Meryl Streep gave equal time to Golden Age legends and below-the-line veterans. In a departure from past years, there were no clips for any of the more recognizable names but rather a series of stylized photo illustrations. Academy officials have long urged attendees to avoid giving the impression that the tribute is a popularity contest by holding applause until the end.

The segment opened with Mickey Rooney followed by director Paul Mazursky and was applause-free, as far as telecast viewers could discern, in the Dolby Theater until the final image of director Mike Nichols flashed on screen.

Joan Rivers was a notable omission from the on-air list. The comedian who died at 80 in September had a limited film resume, to be sure, but
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2015: Live Blog

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars 2015: Live Blog
All the winners from Sunday’s 87th Academy Awards.

Show host Harris signs off with a chirpy, “Buenos noches!”

Sean Penn walks on. It’s time for the big one. Best film. Will it be Birdman or Boyhood? It’s Birdman! The movie ends the night tied with The Grand Budapest Hotel on four Oscars. Inarritu, referring to his pal Alfonso Cuaron who enjoyed success with Gravity at last year’s show, says, “Two Mexicans in a row. That’s suspicious, I guess.” Slightly more seriously, Agi also calls on his fellow Mexicans to help build a strong future for his beloved country. Wow, a good night for Birdman and a surprisingly barren one for Boyhood. Pirates indeed, Ethan Hawke, but glorious pirates.

And now Matthew McConaughey saunters on stage to announce best actress. Julianne Moore, five times a nominee at the Oscars is the favourite. Will she get it this time for Still Alice? Yes she’s got
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ed Nelson, ‘Peyton Place’ Star, Character Actor, Dies at 85

Ed Nelson, ‘Peyton Place’ Star, Character Actor, Dies at 85
Ed Nelson, a star of the 1960s primetime soap “Peyton Place” and an actor with almost 200 credits, mostly in television, died on Saturday in Greensboro, N.C. He was 85.

Nelson had most recently appeared in the 2003 courtroom thriller “Runaway Jury,” starring Gene Hackman. He had a more significant role as General Sherman in the 1998 Jackie Chan vehicle “Who Am I.”

On “Peyton Place,” he played Dr. Michael Rossi during the entire five-year run of the series — 436 episodes. He returned in 1985 for reunion telepic “Peyton Place: The Next Generation.”

But Nelson was already a TV veteran by the time he was cast on “Peyton Place” in 1964. After a string of small parts in Roger Corman B movies during the mid to late ’50s, he began guesting on Westerns such as “Zane Grey Theater,” “Have Gun — Will Travel,” “The Rifleman,” “Maverick,” “Rawhide” and “Gunsmoke” plus other series such as “Twilight Zone,” “The Untouchables,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

James Shigeta obituary

Actor who was one of the first Asian Americans to play big parts in Hollywood films

James Shigeta, who has died aged 85, was one of the very few Asian-American actors to have played big parts in Hollywood films. Born in Hawaii of Japanese ancestry, Shigeta broke through the barrier to screen stardom, bringing dignity and stature to his roles. Handsome and charismatic, with a rich singing and speaking baritone voice, Shigeta was cast in several films in which he was the equal of his co-stars, sometimes being permitted to have inter-racial screen romances, despite what amounted to a tacit prohibition in Hollywood.

Shigeta's breakthrough gradually helped to prevent the practice of actors such as Marlon Brando, Alec Guinness and Mickey Rooney playing Japanese characters with embarrassingly crude results. However, as was the Hollywood custom, Shigeta, often elevating poor material, was called upon to play Japanese, Chinese, Filipino and Polynesian characters,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

James Shigeta Dead At Age 81; Actor Broke Racial Barriers In The 1950S And 1960S

  • CinemaRetro
Actor James Shigeta has died at age 81. Born in Honolulu, Shigeta became a singing star in Japan- despite not knowing how to speak the language. In the 1950s and 1960s, he- along with actress Nancy Kwan- broke racial barriers in Hollywood. It was traditional for caucasian actors to play Asian leading characters. However, the handsome Shigeta landed a lead role in the film version of the Broadway hit musical Flower Drum Song, starring alongside Kwan. The film was significant in that all the leading roles were played by Asian actors. Shigeta, riding high from good reviews, carved a successful career in television and theatrical feature films. Among his credits were the Elvis Presley film Paradise, Hawaiian Style, Bridge to the Sun, Midway, the ill-fated 1973 musical remake of Lost Horizon and the blockbuster 1988 action film Die Hard. For more click here .  

(Nancy Kwan discusses her friendship with James Shigeta and
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Beyoncé Looks Down on Kim Kardashian, Andi Dorfman Gives Her Final Rose, + More of Today’s First Dibs

The truth about Beyoncé and Jay-z‘s decision to skip Kim and Kanye’s wedding finally emerges, Andi Dorfman makes girls all over the country sad, Freddie Prinze, Jr. has some fighting words under that million dollar smile, and more of what you missed while you were catching z’s.

Did Beyoncé and Jay-z skip out on the Kimye wedding to protect their social status? [Hollywood Life] The Twittersphere exploded when Bachelorette star Andi Dorfman accepted a marriage proposal from Josh Murray on last night’s finale. ’90s hottie Freddie Prinze, Jr. said he wanted to quit acting after working with Kiefer Sutherland. [Us Weekly] Naomi Watts channels her inner stripper in the Vincent trailer. [Just Jared] Die Hard star James Shigeta passed away at 81. [Variety] The New York Post argues that the Real Housewives franchise is officially dead. Do you agree? [NY Post] Martha Stewart gives her two cents on Blake Lively‘s lifestyle blog. [Naughty But Nice Rob] Audrina Patridge and
See full article at TheFabLife - Movies »

Beyoncé Looks Down on Kim Kardashian, Andi Dorfman Gives Her Final Rose, + More of Today’s First Dibs

  • VH1.com
The truth about Beyoncé and Jay-z‘s decision to skip Kim and Kanye’s wedding finally emerges, Andi Dorfman makes girls all over the country sad, Freddie Prinze, Jr. has some fighting words under that million dollar smile, and more of what you missed while you were catching z’s.

Did Beyoncé and Jay-z skip out on the Kimye wedding to protect their social status? [Hollywood Life] The Twittersphere exploded when Bachelorette star Andi Dorfman accepted a marriage proposal from Josh Murray on last night’s finale. ’90s hottie Freddie Prinze, Jr. said he wanted to quit acting after working with Kiefer Sutherland. [Us Weekly] Naomi Watts channels her inner stripper in the Vincent trailer. [Just Jared] Die Hard star James Shigeta passed away at 81. [Variety] The New York Post argues that the Real Housewives franchise is officially dead. Do you agree? [NY Post] Martha Stewart gives her two cents on Blake Lively‘s lifestyle blog. [Naughty But Nice Rob] Audrina Patridge and
See full article at VH1.com »

Daily | Fukasaku, Cahiers, Buñuel

In today's roundup of news and views, Grady Hendrix writes up a terrific appreciation of Kinji Fukasaku; Film Comment's pulled up from its archives remembrances of Luis Buñuel by Michel Piccoli, Jeanne Moreau, Catherine Deneuve, Bulle Ogier and Franco Nero; Chris Marker is remembered on his birthday; in 1962, Studs Terkel interviewed Jacques Tati; Thom Andersen writes about Francesco Vezzoli; Nina Menkes reports on this year's Jerusalem Film Festival; Matt Zoller Seitz remembers James Shigeta; and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Fukasaku, Cahiers, Buñuel

In today's roundup of news and views, Grady Hendrix writes up a terrific appreciation of Kinji Fukasaku; Film Comment's pulled up from its archives remembrances of Luis Buñuel by Michel Piccoli, Jeanne Moreau, Catherine Deneuve, Bulle Ogier and Franco Nero; Chris Marker is remembered on his birthday; in 1962, Studs Terkel interviewed Jacques Tati; Thom Andersen writes about Francesco Vezzoli; Nina Menkes reports on this year's Jerusalem Film Festival; Matt Zoller Seitz remembers James Shigeta; and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

James Shigeta Dead: Die Hard, Mulan, Flower Drum Song Actor Dies at 81

James Shigeta Dead: Die Hard, Mulan, Flower Drum Song Actor Dies at 81
Top Asian-American actor James Shigeta, who rose to fame in the '60s after starring in Rodgers & Hammerstein's Flower Drum Song, died Monday, July 28, in L.A., his publicist announced. He was 81. The Hawaiian native's nearly 50-year film and TV career spanned from the late 1950s into the new millennium. Shigeta received a Golden Globe Award for Best Male Newcomer in 1960, after starring as a young detective in the 1959 movie, The Crimson Kimono. He co-starred with Donald O'Connor and Glenn Ford in the 1961 movie, [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

In memoriam: James Shigeta

We pay tribute to the actor James Shigeta, famous for his roles in Flower Drum Song, Die Hard, and a legion other turns on stage and TV.

For a generation of moviegoers, James Shigeta will be immediately recognisable as Joseph Takagi, the Nakatomi Corporation boss who's ruthlessly despatched by Alan Rickman's sneering villain in the 1988 hit, Die Hard. But there was so much more to Shigeta than John McTiernan's action classic - that appearance was, in fact, but one of many in a long and fruitful career on stage, television and the silver screen.

Born in Hawaii in 1933, Shigeta embarked on a singing career after winning first place in a TV show called Original Amateur Hour. His subsequent success was such that a lengthy run of appearances in Tokyo musicals left him with the nickname, The Frank Sinatra of Japan.

Returning to America in the late 1950s, Shigeta
See full article at Den of Geek »

James Shigeta, Groundbreaking Asian-American Actor, Dies At 81

Legendary Asian-American actor James Shigeta died at the age of 81 on Monday, July 28.

James Shigeta Died July 28

Shigeta’s agent announced the news on Monday with a statement:

“It is with great sadness that I report the loss of my long time friend and client James Shigeta…James passed peacefully in his sleep, July 28, 2014, at 2 p.m. The world has lost a great actor. Sadly, I lost a dear friend.”

Shigeta, who began his onscreen career in 1959, is largely considered the first breakthrough Asian-American star. Born in Hawaii, Shigeta studied acting at Nyu and served as a Marine in the Korean War. He also had a successful singing career in Japan prior to his American success.

Shigeta made his feature film debut in Crimson Kimono (1959), earning his breakout role two years later in the Rogers and Hammerstein’s Flower Drum Song.

Most of his career was comprised of TV guest
See full article at Uinterview »

Die Hard actor James Shigeta dies, aged 81

Die Hard actor James Shigeta dies, aged 81
Asian-American actor James Shigeta has died, aged 81.

Shigeta made several television and movie appearances throughout his career, notably in the first Die Hard film.

The actor played executive Joseph Takagi in the 1988 movie, who is shot by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman) after refusing to surrender the security code to the skyscraper's bank vault.

Prior to Die Hard, Shigeta also starred in the 1961 film adaptation of Broadway musical Flower Drum Song as Wang Ta.

The Honolulu-born actor also appeared in Paradise, Hawaiian Style, Midway and Lost Horizon.

His television credits include Hawaii 5-0, Perry Mason, Mission: Impossible, Ironside, and Beverly Hills 90210.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

R.I.P. James Shigeta

R.I.P. James Shigeta
The actor whose 50-year career included a star turn in Flower Drum Song and a memorable roles in Die Hard and Midway, died today in Los Angeles. James Shigeta was 81. The Hawaii native had scores of film and TV credits from the late 1950s into the 2000s. In 1960, he shared a Best Male Newcomer Golden Globe Award with George Hamilton, Troy Donahue and Barry Coe after making his screen debut as a detective in The Crimson Kimono. Notable film roles followed in such early 1960s films as Walk Like A Dragon with Jack Lord, with whom he’d reteam […]
See full article at Deadline »

James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81

James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81
James Shigeta, one of the first prominent Asian-American actors, who co-starred in “Die Hard” and starred in “Flower Drum Song,” died Monday at 81.

Though largely a TV actor who guest-starred on dozens of shows, he appeared memorably in hit 1988 action film “Die Hard,” in which he played executive Joseph Takagi, who refuses to give up the security code to the skyscraper’s bank vault when a group of German terrorists seizes the building. He was shot in the head by the group’s leader, Hans Gruber, played by Alan Rickman.

In the big-budget WWII film “Midway” (1976), which told the story of the key battle from both American and Japanese points of view, Shigeta was featured prominently in the role of Vice Admiral Nagumo, whose despair at Japan’s loss in the battle is moving.

The actor had most recently appeared in the 2009 film “The People I’ve Slept With,” directed by Quentin Lee.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81

James Shigeta, Star of ‘Flower Drum Song’ and ‘Die Hard’ Co-Star, Dies at 81
James Shigeta, one of the first prominent Asian-American actors, who co-starred in “Die Hard” and starred in “Flower Drum Song,” died Monday at 81.

Though largely a TV actor who guest-starred on dozens of shows, he appeared memorably in hit 1988 action film “Die Hard,” in which he played executive Joseph Takagi, who refuses to give up the security code to the skyscraper’s bank vault when a group of German terrorists seizes the building. He was shot in the head by the group’s leader, Hans Gruber, played by Alan Rickman.

In the big-budget WWII film “Midway” (1976), which told the story of the key battle from both American and Japanese points of view, Shigeta was featured prominently in the role of Vice Admiral Nagumo, whose despair at Japan’s loss in the battle is moving.

The actor had most recently appeared in the 2009 film “The People I’ve Slept With,” directed by Quentin Lee.
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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