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Allan Sherman Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (20) | Personal Quotes (2)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 30 November 1924Chicago, Illinois, USA
Date of Death 20 November 1973Los Angeles, California, USA  (emphysema)
Birth NameAllan Copelon

Mini Bio (1)

Allan Sherman was born on November 30, 1924 in Chicago, Illinois, USA as Allan Copelon. He was married to Dee Chackes. He died on November 20, 1973 in Los Angeles, California, USA.

Spouse (1)

Dee Chackes (15 June 1945 - 1966) (divorced) (2 children)

Trivia (20)

Introduced Bill Cosby to his first national audience. Famous song parodist, usually teamed with Lou Busch.
Author of two books, "A Gift of Laughter," an autobiography published in 1964, and "The Rape of the APE" (American Puritan Ethic), a critically praised comic history of the sexual revolution published in 1973, a few months before his death.
Comedian and song parodist extrordinaire, whose humor albums ("My Son, the Folksinger," "Allan in Wonderland") were best-sellers during the 1960's.
Said to be one of then-President John F. Kennedy's favorite comedians. Kennedy could frequently be heard singing Sherman's parodies.
Scored a top-ten hit in 1963 with "Hello, Muddah! Hello, Fadduh! (A Letter from Camp)."
Original creator/producer of both "I've Got a Secret" and Jackie Gleason's game show fiasco "You're in the Picture," the former running almost two decades, the latter running for only one week!
Died while entertaining friends at the piano.
Hosted "The Tonight Show" episode with the first apperance of a 25 year old Bill Cosby.
Father of Robert Sherman.
Sherman was his mother's maiden name.
Co-wrote his first (and last) Broadway musical with Albert Hague in 1969. A satire on the so-called sexual revolution titled "The Fig Leaves Are Falling", it was directed by Broadway legend George Abbott and starred Barry Nelson, Dorothy Loudon and David Cassidy. It was the latter's Broadway debut, more than a year before he won fame on The Partridge Family (1970). The show itself ran exactly four performances.
Began his public career as a song parodist by recording two songs for the small Jubilee Records label, "Jake's Song," based on the Bing and Gary Crosby hit "Sam's Song," and "A Satchel and a Seck," based on "A Bushel and a Peck" from "Guys and Dolls." The recording went nowhere upon its initial release in 1951, but when it was re-released in 1962, following the success of "My Son the Folk-Singer," it sold moderately well. It was said that Sherman was not particularly proud of this early effort.
In or around 1957, while he was still a TV producer, Sherman prepared a full-length Jewish-American parody of "My Fair Lady," then the hottest show on Broadway, but was never able to record it because of copyright considerations. The parody included such song titles as "With a Little Bit of Lox" (based on "With a Little Bit of Luck") and "I've Got the Customers to Face" (based on "I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face").
Although Sherman was credited as co-producer on Bill Cosby's first three albums on Warner Brothers Records, Cosby later admitted that Sherman's involvement was minimal at best but was emphasized on the album covers in order to boost sales.
Served in the U.S. Army for only a few months in WWII, when he was discharged as medically unfit. The cause, reportedly, was an allergy to Brazil nuts.
He had been a comedy writer for other comedians including Joe E. Lewis and Jackie Gleason.
He attended the University of Illinois.
Release of his book, "The Rape of the APE (American Puritan Ethic)".
Release of his book, "Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah (A Letter From Camp)" by Allan with Lou Busch.
Release of his autobiography, "A Gift of Laughter".

Personal Quotes (2)

Nobody ever told me anything about sex. I was a nice Jewish boy so I knew you shouldn't do it, whatever it was, to nice girls. All my life I have been attracted to nice girls - the kind you aren't supposed to do it to. And they, too, have been brought up, at least in my generation, that they shouldn't do it either. How it gets done between nice people is a mystery to me. What I think happens is, nice people do it, but their hearts aren't in it.
On why he always insisted on full orchestral backing on his recordings: "The effect is like this - you're looking into Tiffany's most elegant store window, and in the window is a black velvet pillow, and right in the middle of the pillow is an onion - that's me!"

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