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Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘Doubt’: A look back at her 15th Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 15 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her at the Academy Awards, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

On the heels of the spectacular box office success of “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006), Meryl Streep was more a household name than ever. Even teens and twentysomethings who weren’t terribly familiar with Streep’s body of work could now instantly identify the actress who made Miranda Priestly a big screen icon. She quickly hopped aboard three projects for 2007, all of which screamed ‘Oscar contender’ on paper and unfortunately, all of which underperformed upon release.

First, there was “Evening,” a supremely sleepy drama which, despite the presence of heavyweights including Streep, Glenn Close, Claire Danes and Vanessa Redgrave, failed to leave
See full article at Gold Derby »

15 Things ‘Moonstruck’ Nailed About Italian-Americans: From Superstitions to Dean Martin (Photos)

  • The Wrap
15 Things ‘Moonstruck’ Nailed About Italian-Americans: From Superstitions to Dean Martin (Photos)
From the family gatherings in the kitchen to the kooky nicknames and Drama Queen reactions to just about everything, “Moonstruck” hits the Italian-American personality out of the park. On the 30th anniversary of the film that brought Cher, Olympia Dukakis and screenwriter John Patrick Shanley Academy Awards and producer/director Norman Jewison nominations, I – a full-blooded Italian from both sides of the family – take a look at the Italian-inspired details that make it a classic. Dean MartinMoonstruck” opens with the quintessential Italian song (“That’s Amore”) sung by the quintessential Italian crooner (Dean Martin). Any song that pays tribute to.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Call Me by Your Name’: Timothée Chalamet is Learning How to Be a Man, Onscreen and Off

  • Indiewire
‘Call Me by Your Name’: Timothée Chalamet is Learning How to Be a Man, Onscreen and Off
When “Call Me by Your Name” screened at the New York Film Festival last month, several threads from Timothée Chalamet’s 21-year-old life wove together. Above the sold-out, 1,100-seat audience at Alice Tully Hall, he watched the second half from the balcony, seated next to the actor who plays his lover, Armie Hammer, and their director, Luca Guadagnino. Onscreen, Chalamet’s character was 17, the same age he was when Guadagnino met him. At that time, Chalamet was a student at Fiorello H. Laguardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts — the Upper West Side inspiration for “Fame” — across the street.

Read More: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Review: Luca Guadagnino Delivers A Queer Masterpiece — Sundance 2017

In kindergarten, Chalamet was a lukewarm commercial actor. His “first moment of passion” for the craft came at age 12, seeing Heath Ledger’s Joker in “The Dark Knight.” “I just had no clue what
See full article at Indiewire »

Lost Horizon (1937)

It’s a wonder movie from the 1930s, a political fantasy that imagines a Utopia of peace and kindness hidden away in a distant mountain range — or in our daydreams. Sony’s new restoration is indeed impressive. Ronald Colman is seduced by a vision of a non-sectarian Heaven on Earth, while Savant indulges his anti-Frank Capra grumblings in his admiring but hesitant review essay.

Lost Horizon (1937)

80th Anniversary Blu-ray + HD Digital

Sony

1937 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 133 min. / Street Date October 3, 2017 / 19.99

Starring: Ronald Colman, Jane Wyatt, Edward Everett Horton, John Howard, Thomas Mitchell, Margo, Isabel Jewell, H.B. Warner, Sam Jaffe, Noble Johnson, Richard Loo.

Cinematography: Joseph Walker

Film Editors: Gene Havelick, Gene Milford

Art Direction: Stephen Goosson

Musical director: Max Steiner

Original Music: Dimitri Tiomkin

Written by Robert Riskin from the novel by James Hilton

Produced and Directed by Frank Capra

Frank Capra had a way with actors and comedy
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Everyone Loves the New 'Star Wars Last Jedi' Trailer

  • Yidio
2017-10-10T07:01:50-07:00Everyone Loves the New 'Star Wars Last Jedi' Trailer

With about two months to go until the release of Star Wars: Episode VIII - The Last Jedi, Disney is turning up the hype by releasing a new trailer for the sequel. The strategy is working, because everyone is talking about the trailer, and it seems that everyone loves it, especially the folks at The Hollywood Reporter.

Via The Hollywood Reporter.

The new Star Wars: The Last Jedi trailer has arrived, and it's as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in happiness.

To break down all of those thoughts, The Hollywood Reporter's Ryan Parker, Graeme McMillan, Erik Hayden, Ashley Lee, Patrick Shanley and Aaron Couch are taking a closer look at the trailer for Rian Johnson's film.

Aaron Couch: We deal in hyperbole when it comes to these movies all the time,
See full article at Yidio »

'Star Wars': How the 'Last Jedi' Trailer Nailed It

The new Star Wars: The Last Jedi trailer has arrived, and it's as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in happiness.

To break down all those thoughts, The Hollywood Reporter's Ryan Parker, Graeme McMillan, Erik Hayden, Ashley Lee, Patrick Shanley and Aaron Couch are taking a closer look at the trailer for Rian Johnson's film.

Aaron Couch: We deal in hyperbole when it comes to these movies all the time, but I have to ask: is this one of the best trailers of all time? I used to watch the final trailer for The Dark Knight every day in the month leading up...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Photo Flash: First Look at Jason Alexander and More in The Portuguese Kid at Mtc

The Portuguese Kid, a new play written and directed by Tony, Pulitzer Prize, and Academy Award winner John Patrick Shanley, is currently in previews ahead of a Tuesday, October 24 opening night at Mtc at New York City Center - Stage I 131 West 55th Street. Performances began Tuesday, September 19. BroadwayWorld has a first look at the cast in action below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Italian-American actor-director John Turturro, who stars in Richard Price and Steve Zaillian’s widely hailed limited series “The Night Of” (HBO).

Bottom Line: For 37 years, versatile New York actor John Turturro has delivered memorable characters who can be incredibly smart (“Quiz Show”) or insanely stupid (bowler Jesus Quintano in “The Big Lebowski”), lovable (“Fading Gigolo”) or menacing (the pool hustler in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color Of Money”). He’s a go-to player for both the Coens and Spike Lee as well as a reliable character actor for Hollywood tentpoles such as “The Transformers.”

Career Peaks: After winning a scholarship to the Yale Drama School and performing Ibsen, Ionesco, and John Patrick Shanley off-Broadway, Turturro got stuck playing violent killers in films like “Five Corners
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin

‘The Night Of’: Why John Turturro’s Itchy Lawyer Gets Under Our Skin
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Italian-American actor-director John Turturro, who stars in Richard Price and Steve Zaillian’s widely hailed limited series “The Night Of” (HBO).

Bottom Line: For 37 years, versatile New York actor John Turturro has delivered memorable characters who can be incredibly smart (“Quiz Show”) or insanely stupid (bowler Jesus Quintano in “The Big Lebowski”), lovable (“Fading Gigolo”) or menacing (the pool hustler in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color Of Money”). He’s a go-to player for both the Coens and Spike Lee as well as a reliable character actor for Hollywood tentpoles such as “The Transformers.”

Career Peaks: After winning a scholarship to the Yale Drama School and performing Ibsen, Ionesco, and John Patrick Shanley off-Broadway, Turturro got stuck playing violent killers in films like “Five Corners
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Joe versus the Volcano

“May you live to be a thousand years old, sir.” Still the most widely unheralded great movie on the books, John Patrick Shanley’s lightweight/profound fable is an unmitigated delight. See Tom Hanks at the end of the first phase of his career plus Meg Ryan in an unacknowledged career highlight. How can a movie be so purposely insubstantial, and yet be ‘heavier’ than a dozen pictures with ‘big things to say?’

Joe Versus the Volcano

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1990 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 20, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Lloyd Bridges, Robert Stack, Abe Vigoda,

Dan Hedaya, Barry McGovern, Amanda Plummer, Ossie Davis

Cinematography Stephen Goldblatt

Production Designer Bo Welch

Film Editors Richard Halsey, Kenneth Wannberg

Original Music Georges Delerue

Produced by Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall, Steven Spielberg and Teri Schwartz

Written and Directed by John Patrick Shanley

I think I found
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Phil Lamarr on 'Samurai Jack': "I Consider It a Work of Art"

Phil Lamarr is having a very busy 2017.

In addition to wrapping up the final season of Samurai Jack, the fan-favorite animated epic 16 years in the making, the prolific voice actor also turned in a starring role as Aquaman and Green Lantern in the best-selling DC fighting game Injustice 2. If that weren't enough, Lamarr is also set to voice-star in Tyler, the Creator's upcoming Adult Swim animated comedy The Jellies.

Lamarr, in a recent interview on the Namek vs. Saiyan podcast, hosted by The Hollywood Reporter's Patrick Shanley, opened up about his many roles and ruminated on...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Ali Stroker, John Patrick Shanley to Receive 2017 Nyu Alumni Awards

Ali Stroker who appears in the upcoming ABC drama Ten Days In the Valley which premieres in a few months amp stars Emmy Award-winner Kyra Sedgwick will be honored on Friday, April 21 at Gotham Hall in New York City by her alma mater New York University at the Nyu Alumni Association's Annual Awards Luncheon, where she will be celebratedalongside two other distinguished alumni Academy Award, Tony Award amp Pulitzer Prize Award-winner John Patrick Shanley Steinhardt '77, Hon '09 and attorney Martin Lipton Law '55. Stroker will receive the Distinguished Young Alumna Award.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Novitiate’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Novitiate’
Her film may have far too many weighty matters on its mind to leave much room for petty resentments, but one wonders if writer-director Maggie Betts isn’t the teeniest bit annoyed that a certain other prestige drama about Catholic self-doubt and self-sacrifice beat hers to the title “Silence.” It would certainly be the ideal moniker for “Novitiate,” a piercing, immersive, and superbly played convent drama in which the suppression of speech is witnessed at both an individual and institutional level. The film marks an impressive first foray into starring vehicles for Margaret Qualley, ideally cast as a teenage nun-in-training whose devotional conflicts coincide with the Vatican’s radical reform of the Catholic Church in the early 1960s. But the most searing material here is reserved for Melissa Leo, who’s entirely startling as a merciless Mother Superior whose very sense of spiritual purpose is rocked by the new schemata.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hollywood Insiders Explain How They Got Their First Break (Video)

  • The Wrap
Hollywood Insiders Explain How They Got Their First Break (Video)
Three Hollywood insiders explained how they got their first big break in the entertainment industry at TheWrap’s Breaking Into the Business event on Wednesday night. Producer Alex Noyer of You Know Films, actress and screenwriter Katie Nehra and veteran casting director Marci Liroff sat down with TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman in Los Angeles to discuss their careers and give advice to college students looking to break into entertainment and media. Nehra, who co-wrote Chris Messina’s 2014 directorial debut “Alex of Venice,” said that her first break came from playwright John Patrick Shanley, who cast her in his play “Sailor’s Song.
See full article at The Wrap »

Denzel Washington Stuns With ‘Fences’: How He Dodged Broadway’s Stagey Curse

Denzel Washington Stuns With ‘Fences’: How He Dodged Broadway’s Stagey Curse
Transporting a lauded Broadway play to the screen is a mixed bag. Among those that hug the yellow section of Metacritic are “Phantom of the Opera,” “M. Butterfly,” “Evita,” “Nine,” “For Colored Girls,” “The Producers,” “Rent,” “Carnage,” and more. Too often, a script’s theater origins condemn a film adaptation to the curse of being “stagey.” It’s a transition that requires real skill — and Denzel Washington has it.

In his third directorial outing (“The Debaters,” “Antwone Fisher”), Washington skirts the hazards of “opening up” a play by chasing honest emotions. A two-time acting Oscar winner, Washington knocks ’50s Pittsburgh drama “Fences” out of the park, both as director and disgruntled former baseball player Troy Maxson. Viola Davis as Rose Maxson, and Mykelti Williamson as her husband’s brain-damaged brother Gabriel, are also likely supporting Oscar players. (Davis made the call to change her status to supporting, partly to take
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Denzel Washington Stuns With ‘Fences’: How He Dodged Broadway’s Stagey Curse

  • Indiewire
Denzel Washington Stuns With ‘Fences’: How He Dodged Broadway’s Stagey Curse
Transporting a lauded Broadway play to the screen is a mixed bag. Among those that hug the yellow section of Metacritic are “Phantom of the Opera,” “M. Butterfly,” “Evita,” “Nine,” “For Colored Girls,” “The Producers,” “Rent,” “Carnage,” and more. Too often, a script’s theater origins condemn a film adaptation to the curse of being “stagey.” It’s a transition that requires real skill — and Denzel Washington has it.

In his third directorial outing (“The Debaters,” “Antwone Fisher”), Washington skirts the hazards of “opening up” a play by chasing honest emotions. A two-time acting Oscar winner, Washington knocks ’50s Pittsburgh drama “Fences” out of the park, both as director and disgruntled former baseball player Troy Maxson. Viola Davis as Rose Maxson, and Mykelti Williamson as her husband’s brain-damaged brother Gabriel, are also likely supporting Oscar players. (Davis made the call to change her status to supporting, partly to take
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Arrival’ Trailer: Amy Adams Makes Contact With Aliens In Denis Villeneuve’s New Film

‘Arrival’ Trailer: Amy Adams Makes Contact With Aliens In Denis Villeneuve’s New Film
Last year, Denis Villeneuve’s “Sicario,” about an FBI agent enlisted by a government task force to bring down the leader of a Mexican drug cartel, garnered critical acclaim and commercial success and netted three Oscar nominations to boot. Now, Villeneuve returns with his sci-fi drama “Arrival,” starring Amy Adams (“The Master”) and Jeremy Renner (“The Hurt Locker”). Based on Ted Chiang’s short story “Story of Your Life,” the film follows linguist Louis Banks (Adams) who’s hired by the government to help translate alien communications after a dozen extraterrestrial pods enter Earth’s atmosphere. Watch a trailer for the film below and check out the poster as well.

Read More: ‘Arrival’ Review: Amy Adams Steals Spotlight In Denis Villeneuve’s Deep-Thinking Alien Invasion Story

Villeneuve has previously directed eight feature films, including “Enemy,” about a man who seeks out his doppelgänger after spotting him in a movie, “Prisoners,
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Synecdoche, New York,’ Kristen Stewart, ‘The Killer’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

The Philip Seymour Hoffman retro has a banner weekend, including Doubt and Synecdoche, New York introduced by John Patrick Shanley and followed by a Charlie Kaufman Q & A, respectively.

The logical pairing of Agnès Varda‘s Le Bonheur and Hype WilliamsBelly happens on Sunday.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

If you like good things,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The strange prehistory of 1995's Congo

Ryan Lambie Sep 12, 2016

It was a camp classic in 1995, but did you know Congo was once going to be made in the early 80s with a real gorilla and Sean Connery?

"Congo is a dead project that will never be made" - Michael Crichton, 1983

Just about everywhere you looked in the summer of 1995, a pair of simian eyes stared back at you from the poster of Congo. Based on the best-selling Michael Crichton novel, Congo was billed as that year’s equivalent of Jurassic Park - another exciting creature feature with cutting-edge special effects and maybe just a tiny dash of horror.

“It’s a little like Alien at the beginning,” enthused director Frank Marshall, “in that it’s based in science fact, and like Indiana Jones at the end, with the lost city of Zinj.”

Determined to push Congo as a must-see summer film capable of competing with such
See full article at Den of Geek »

These Three

Radical changes were required to adapt Lillian Hellman's Broadway play for post-Code Hollywood, to eradicate a theme that in 1934 was entirely taboo. But were audiences really unaware of the subject matter switch? William Wyler excels with this bowdlerized, yet curiously near-perfect, story about the power of scandal. These Three DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1936 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 93 min. / Street Date February 9, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Miriam Hopkins, Merle Oberon, Joel McCrea, Catharine Doucet, Alma Kruger, Bonita Granville, Marcia Mae Jones , Carmencita Johnson, Mary Ann Durkin, Margaret Hamilton, Walter Brennan. Cinematography Gregg Toland Film Editor Daniel Mandell Original Music Alfred Newman Written by Lillian Hellman Produced by Samuel Goldwyn Directed by William Wyler

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

William Wyler directed half a decade's worth of silent westerns before his big break came. From that point on he made high profile dramas, almost all of which are excellent movies.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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