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13 Cursed Movies for Friday the 13th (Photos)

  • The Wrap
13 Cursed Movies for Friday the 13th (Photos)
Happy Friday the 13th. Making movies is a business that proves that Murphy’s Law is a real and horrifying thing. For these 13 movies, chaos, misfortune, and sometimes an unnerving amount of death hovered over like a black raincloud that won’t go away. Over the course of the making of the Poltergeist trilogy, four cast members died. The most shocking was 12-year-old Heather O’Rourke, who died of septic shock at age 12. No one was seriously hurt during filming of The Omen. but chaos seemed to surround everyone involved. Star Gregory Peck and screenwriter David Seltzer had their flights struck by.
See full article at The Wrap »

19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

  • PEOPLE.com
19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory
American treasure and crown jewel in Gene Wilder's spectacular oeuvre Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory turns 45 this week. To celebrate, not only have we justly singled out the crime that was Gene Wilder getting passed over for an Oscar, but we're also giving fans an anniversary-based roundup of obscure facts and trivial bits about everyone's favorite vaguely sinister candy factory. 1. Wilder only accepted the role on one condition In a letter to director Mel Stuart, Wilder wrote that he'd read the script and would take the part on the condition that, "When I make my first entrance, I'd like
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

  • PEOPLE.com
19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory
American treasure and crown jewel in Gene Wilder's spectacular oeuvre Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory turns 45 this week. To celebrate, not only have we justly singled out the crime that was Gene Wilder getting passed over for an Oscar, but we're also giving fans an anniversary-based roundup of obscure facts and trivial bits about everyone's favorite vaguely sinister candy factory. 1. Wilder only accepted the role on one condition In a letter to director Mel Stuart, Wilder wrote that he'd read the script and would take the part on the condition that, "When I make my first entrance, I'd like
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘The Omen’ Prequel Movie in the Works at Fox

‘The Omen’ Prequel Movie in the Works at Fox
Fox is developing “The First Omen,” a prequel to 1976’s horror-thriller “The Omen,” with Antonio Campos in talks to direct and David S. Goyer on board to produce.

Ben Jacoby has written the script for the prequel. Campos directed “Christine,” which premiered at Sundance and starred Rebecca Hall as Christine Chubbuck, the 29-year-old news reporter who committed suicide on live television in 1974.

Goyer, best known for his work on “The Dark Knight” trilogy, is producing with Kevin Turen through their Phantom Four banner.

The Omen” was directed by Richard Donner from a David Seltzer script. The film, starring Gregory Peck, Lee Remick and David Warner, revolved around a young child adopted at birth by an American Ambassador and his wife who are unaware that the child is the Antichrist.

The Omen” was a strong box office performer with over $60 million and won an Academy Award for best original score for Jerry Goldsmith.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Real-Life Version of Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory Will (Kind Of) Exist Soon

  • Movies.com
For readers of a certain age, Roald Dahl's books played a wonderful role in their childhood. He captured the anxiety and beauty of children in stories as varied as James and the Giant Peach, Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Witches, Matilda and The Bfg. Dahl turned to the movie world in the late 1960s, writing the scripts for the James Bond spy thriller You Only Live Twice and the children's fantasy Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, but his experience in adapting his own book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was not very satisfying. The wildly popular book, first published in 1964, was inspired by Dahl's own brief time as a chocolate taster, and went on to sell more than 13 million copies worldwide. After penning the first draft of the screenplay, David Seltzer (The Omen) came on...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Glen Mazzara Talks Damien, The Walking Dead, Overlook Hotel

  • DailyDead
The Antichrist is coming to A&E on March 7th with the premiere of Damien, a sequel series to 1976’s The Omen. Ahead of the show’s debut, Daily Dead recently took part in a conference call with Damien executive producer and showrunner Glen Mazzara. In addition to discussing his new series, Mazzara also recalled one of his favorite memories from working on The Walking Dead and talked briefly about studying Stanley Kubrick’s style while writing Overlook Hotel, a prequel to The Shining.

On re-teaming with Scott Wilson, who played Hershel Greene on The Walking Dead:

Glen Mazzara: Scott and I loved working together on The Walking Dead. I just think he’s such a huge talent. One of the best nights of my career was talking to him late one night while we were filming the barn burning scene and we had Norman [Reedus] riding around on a motorcycle shooting zombies,
See full article at DailyDead »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Omen

  • Cinelinx
Our series on remakes continues with a film which is more of a duplication than an actual remake. This week, Cinelinx looks at The Omen (2006).

If you’ve seen the original version of The Omen (1976) and then you watch the remake from 2006, you have to ask “Why did they even bother?” The remake was barely even a remake. It was a shot-for-shot, scene -for-scene copy of the original. Released on the 30th anniversary of the original, it offered absolutely nothing new, except a more modern cast and some mediocre CGI effects. Other than that, this is a completely unnecessary, gratuitous photo-copy of the first version.

About this film Rolling Stone Magazine wrote, “Not since Gus Van Sant inexplicably directed a shot by shot remake of Hitchcock’s Psycho has a thriller been copied with so little point or impact”. Recently, we did a dissection of the Van Sant remake of
See full article at Cinelinx »

200 Greatest Horror Films (90-81)

  • SoundOnSight
Special mention: Häxan

Directed by Benjamin Christensen

Denmark / Sweden, 1922

Genre: Documentary

Häxan (a.k.a The Witches or Witchcraft Through The Ages) is a 1922 silent documentary about the history of witchcraft, told in a variety of styles, from illustrated slideshows to dramatized reenactments of alleged real-life events. Written and directed by Benjamin Christensen, and based partly on Christensen’s study of the Malleus Maleficarum, Häxan is a fine examination of how superstition and the misunderstanding of mental illness could lead to the hysteria of the witch-hunts. At the time, it was the most expensive Scandinavian film ever made, costing nearly 2 million Swedish krona. Although it won acclaim in Denmark and Sweden, the film was banned in the United States and heavily censored in other countries for what were considered, at that time, graphic depictions of torture, nudity, and sexual perversion. Depending on which version you’re watching, the commentary is
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘CSI’ Finale: Creator Anthony Zuiker on Emotional Endings, Origins and Longevity

It’s one of TV’s great rags-to-riches stories: Young guy from Las Vegas delivers a global smash hit with his first-ever TV script.

Anthony Zuiker, 47, was not so far removed from his job driving a tram for a Sin City hotel when he managed to field the pilot for “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” for Jerry Bruckheimer TV and CBS in 2000. A well-arranged marriage of Zuiker with veteran showrunners Carol Mendelsohn and Ann Donahue set “CSI” off on a journey that would change the course of TV history and spawn three spinoffs, most recently the Patricia Arquette starrer “CSI: Cyber.”

With the mothership wrapping its 15-year run with a two-hour movie airing Sunday night, creator/exec producer Zuiker spoke with Variety about the emotional experience of writing the finale, reuniting with original “CSI” stars William Petersen and Marg Helgenberger and his deep appreciation for Mendelsohn, Donahue, CBS’ Nina Tassler, Leslie Moonves
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Fox Prepping Another Remake of The Omen!

Filed right under 'completely unnecessary' comes news that 20th Century Fox is readying yet another remake of classic 70's horror 'The Omen'. Yup, even though recent news confirmed that Lifetime were busy working on horror series 'Damien' focusing on a grown up Damien as he comes to grips with his 'demonic destiny' wasn't enough to deter Fox from more Omen antics. The studio will work along with Platinum Dunes to develop the re-remake based on Richard Donner's 1976 cult horror entry penned by David Seltzer. It was reborn into a subpar remake back in 2006 with Liev Schreiber and Julia Stiles....
See full article at Horror Asylum »

The Omen Being Remade Again

20th Century Fox is prepping to unleash everyone's favorite little antichrist, Damien Thorn, onto the masses as apparently another remake is on its way in addition to the previously announced "Damien" TV series. Read on for everything you need to know.

The news comes from Bloody Disgusting, who are reporting that Fox is working with Platinum Dunes to develop a second remake based upon the David Seltzer tale of a little boy with the whole world in his demonic hands.

John Moore directed the insipid 2006 remake (that had a strange fascination with the color red) starring Liev Schreiber, Julia Stiles, and Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick, but let's just forget that all happened, mmkay?

The Omen, from writer David Seltzer and director Richard Donner, starred Gregory Peck and Lee Remick as parents whose son dies at birth and instead secretly adopt an orphan whose mother died at the same time. Only they eventually learn that the child,
See full article at Dread Central »

Former ‘Walking Dead’ Showrunner Developing ‘Omen’ TV Series

  • Screen Rant
Though Glen Mazzara (The Shield) hasn’t predominantly worked within the horror genre, he does have some experience: he took over as showrunner of AMC’s The Walking Dead from creator Frank Darabout in the middle of the zombie drama’s second season and led the series to then-record ratings. Mazzara executive produced the series until the end of season 3 when he split from the show.

Now Mazzara is returning to Fox Television Studios – where he worked on The Shield – to pen a television series based on the 1976 horror film The Omen, titled Damien.

According to THR, Mazzara will write the script for Damien, which will air on Lifetime. The Omen, written by David Seltzer (My Giant) and directed ...

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The post Former ‘Walking Dead’ Showrunner Developing ‘Omen’ TV Series appeared first on Screen Rant.
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'The Omen' TV Series Coming from Former 'Walking Dead' Showrunner

  • MovieWeb
'The Omen' TV Series Coming from Former 'Walking Dead' Showrunner
Glen Mazzara, the former executive producer and showrunner of AMC's The Walking Dead, is developing a TV adaptation of the 1976 horror classic The Omen for Lifetime.

The project is entitled Damien, centering on Damien Thorn, the young boy from the original movie who is now an adult haunted by his past. He is faced with "a series of macabre events" before coming to grips with his true destiny, that he is the Antichrist.

The pilot script will be written by Glen Mazzara, who will executive produce through his 44 Strong Productions company. The deal marks the first through his overall deal with Fox Television Studios. Ross Fineman (Lights Out) will also serve as executive producer.

The Omen, based on the novel by David Seltzer, starred Gregory Peck and Lee Remick as a couple who adopts young Damien (Harvey Stephens) after their lost their own child during birth, only to realize that
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Omen Heads to the Small Screen with Lifetime TV Movie Damien

After a series of sequels and a lackluster remake, I suppose it was inevitable that The Omen would be heading to the small screen, as has recently become the norm for popular horror franchises.

A spin-off made-for-tv flick is indeed in the works, and we've got the latest for ya today. Dig in!

THR reports that former "Walking Dead" showrunner Glen Mazzara is prepping Damien for Lifetime, a series based on the popular franchise that rose from the depths of Hell in 1976. Mazzara will pen the script and executive produce via his 44 Strong Productions banner.

Titled Damien, the drama centers on the film's young boy Damien Thorn. Now an adult and haunted by his past, Damien is faced with a series of macabre events and must finally face his true destiny: he is the Antichrist.

Ross Fineman ("Lights Out") will also executive produce via his Ftvs-based Fineman Entertainment.

The Omen,
See full article at Dread Central »

Walking Dead's Glen Mazzara Is Planning Omen TV Spin-Off

Walking Dead's Glen Mazzara Is Planning Omen TV Spin-Off
Because several sequels, TV movies and the 2006 remake clearly weren’t enough, someone now wants to turn 1976 horror classic The Omen into a TV series. The Walking Dead veteran Glen Mazzara is that someone, preparing a small screen follow-up called, predictably, Damien.The new drama – which will air on Us network Lifetime (a channel not usually known for its horror adaptations, though it has recently had success with a witch drama) – will focus on Damien Thorn, now a grown adult who is confronting the haunting events of his past. As he struggles with a new series of weird happenings, he has to face his true destiny as the Antichrist.It’s not the first time an attempt has been made to convert the Omen’s scares into a TV format: an eponymous 1995 TV movie aimed at a telly franchise but never went ahead. And in 2005, NBC crafted a miniseries called
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Celebrating Roald Dahl's big screen adaptations

Mark Harrison Sep 13, 2016

From James Bond to Willy Wonka, Matilda to The Witches, we chart the big screen work of Roald Dahl...

Roald Dahl has often been referred to as one of the greatest storytellers for children in the 20th century. His books have delighted children for generations, with their dark and inventive sense of humour and their eccentric, dastardly adult characters.

Likewise, his written work for adults has just as much wit and creativity, and over the years, he also worked as a screenwriter on a number of projects, including TV work on Alfred Hitchcock Presents and his own anthology series, Roald Dahl's Tales Of The Unexpected.

Given how it doesn't even take the likes of J.K. Rowling and Stephanie Meyer five years to have their popular works adapted by Hollywood, there has inevitably been an extensive crossover between Dahl's written work and the big screen. His work
See full article at Den of Geek »

Looking back at big screen Roald Dahl adaptations

Feature Mark Harrison 3 Mar 2014 - 07:02

From James Bond to Willy Wonka, Matilda to The Witches, we chart the big screen work of Roald Dahl...

Roald Dahl has often been referred to as one of the greatest storytellers for children in the 20th century. His books have delighted children for generations, with their dark and inventive sense of humour and their eccentric, dastardly adult characters.

Likewise, his written work for adults has just as much wit and creativity, and over the years, he also worked as a screenwriter on a number of projects, including TV work on Alfred Hitchcock Presents and his own anthology series, Roald Dahl's Tales Of The Unexpected.

Given how it doesn't even take the likes of J.K. Rowling and Stephanie Meyer five years to have their popular works adapted by Hollywood, there has inevitably been an extensive crossover between Dahl's written work and the big screen.
See full article at Den of Geek »

9 dubious movie remakes: Psycho, Let Me In, Amazing Spider-Man, more

9 dubious movie remakes: Psycho, Let Me In, Amazing Spider-Man, more
Remakes are nothing new in Hollywood. Take a look back through cinema history and there are plenty of example of ideas and stories being recycled for new audiences. Take, for instance, Robin Hood and Zorro, whose big-screen exploits stretch right the way back to Douglas Fairbanks in the silent era.

Right now two high profile re-dos - Carrie and Oldboy - are screening in cinemas. Considering just how well the originals are regarded, it begs one simple question - why? One carries a recognisable name, the other is a critically lauded foreign-language cult film that has a limited audience.

In the end it may all boil down to making money, but that's still no excuse for some of the remakes that have been served up in recent memory. Digital Spy looks at 9 cinematic remakes that didn't need to happen below...

Psycho (1998)

Fresh from the success of Good Will Hunting, Gus Van Sant
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

5 More Days 'Till Halloween - The Omen (1976)

Luke Owen counts down to Halloween by reviewing horror movies from the last 60 years; next up is The Omen (1976)...

Three years prior to the release of The Omen a little film known as The Exorcist terrified audiences and pissed off church goers. The big kafuffle made by religious groups only spurred on more people to see it so it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that 20th Century Fox would turn their hand to the “supernatural religious horror” with a film that comes with a reputation that almost precedes it…

Yes, one of the most infamous things about Richard Donner’s creepy horror The Omen are the stories that came from its production. After they changed the title of the movie from The Antichrist to The Birthmark, a string of bizarre and deadly events started happening to the cast and crew. Despite taking separate planes, both Gregory Pecks
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory' director Mel Stuart dies at 83

'Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory' director Mel Stuart dies at 83
Mel Stuart, the director of the beloved childhood classic Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, died in Los Angeles on Thursday of cancer. He was 83.

The prolific filmmaker got his start in the early 1960s, directing and producing TV documentaries like The Rafer Johnson Story and Sophia: A Self-Portrait, about the Italian actress Sophia Loren. Stuart was nominated for an Oscar in 1965 for his seminal documentary Four Days in November, about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Some of his other notable documentaries include three editions of The Making of a President, Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and the groundbreaking Wattsax,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »
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