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Berlin Film Review: ‘Land of Storms’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Land of Storms’
A diffident gay soccer player enters into a stormy relationship with a straight-identified builder in “Land of Storms,” a remarkably confident debut from Adam Csaszi. Boasting exceptional performances and evocative visuals, thanks to well-considered lensing paired with deep tonalities possible only on celluloid, “Land” barely puts a foot wrong. Too bad the last scene has such unfortunate resonances: The script discarded several facts from the case it’s based on, so why retain a finale that harks back to a more moralistic era? Notwithstanding this miscalculation, Csaszi’s trenchant drama of desire and homophobia deserves fest and arthouse attention.

Hungarian Szabolcs, nicknamed Szabi (Andras Suto), is a star player on a German team awash in the usual athletic machismo. Unsure about his direction in life and distressed by a fight with roommate Bernard (Sebastian Urzendowsky, “Goodbye First Love”), Szabi sabotages his favored position in the coach’s esteem and suddenly
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Arri sells Little Ghost to Us/Canada

  • ScreenDaily
Arri Worldwide secures North American deal ahead of the Efm, where it will showcase two market premieres.

Arri Worldsales has sealed a North American deal ahead of this week’s European Film Market (Efm) with Vertical Entertainment for Alain Gsponer’s family film The Little Ghost.

Santa Monica-based Vertical acquired all Us and Canadian rights for the adaptation of Otfried Preussler’s internationally bestselling children’s classic, which has been sold to 24 countries worldwide to date.

Vertical Entertainment, which was launched last year by industry veterans Rich Goldberg and Mitch Budin, has previously released such family films as the animated feature Freedom Force and the Russian 3D animated film The Snow Queen. produced by Timur Bekmambetov.

Market premieres

Frederik Steiner’s award-winning Zurich (Und Morgen Mittag Bin Ich Tot) is one of two market premieres being presented by Arri Worldsales at the Efm in Berlin this week.

The film about a young woman suffering from cystic fibrosis
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Arri sells Little Ghost to Us

  • ScreenDaily
Arri Worldwide secures North American deal ahead of the Efm, where it will showcase two market premieres.

Arri Worldsales has sealed a North American deal ahead of this week’s European Film Market (Efm) with Vertical Entertainment for Alain Gsponer’s family film The Little Ghost.

Santa Monica-based Vertical acquired all Us and Canadian rights for the adaptation of Otfried Preussler’s internationally bestselling children’s classic, which has been sold to 24 countries worldwide to date.

Vertical Entertainment, launched last year by industry veterans Rich Goldberg and Mitch Budin, had previously acquired Tim Fehlbaum’s apocalyptic thriller Hell from Arri.

Market premieres

Frederik Steiner’s award-winning Zurich (Und Morgen Mittag Bin Ich Tot) is one of two market premieres being presented by Arri Worldsales at the Efm in Berlin this week.

The film about a young woman suffering from cystic fibrosis who travels to Switzerland to end her life received the prize in the Newcomer category at this
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Eighteen Pix Vie for Debut Helmer Prize at Berlin Film Festival

Eighteen Pix Vie for Debut Helmer Prize at Berlin Film Festival
London — Eighteen films will compete for the best first feature award at the Berlin Film Festival, which comes with a Euros 50,000 ($68,500) prize, shared by the director and the producer.

Entries of note include hotly tipped competish title “’71,” helmed by Yann Demange, Wes Bentley-starrer “Things People Do,” whose helmer Saar Klein earned Oscar noms as one of the editors on “Almost Famous” and “The Thin Red Line,” and Germany-based American helmer Damian John Harper’s “Los Angeles,” which is about a Mexican villager fighting the local gangsters.

The jury members are Italian actress and director Valeria Golino, U.S. director Nancy Buirski and Argentine producer Hernan Musaluppi.

The winners will be announced at the awards ceremony in the Berlinale Palast on Feb. 15.

Competition

“’71” (U.K.) Dir: Yann Demange. With Jack O’Connell, Sean Harris, Richard Dormer.

“Historia del miedo” (History of Fear) (Argentina/Uruguay/Germany/France) Dir: Benjamin Naishtat. With Jonathan Da Rosa,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlinale name First Feature jury

  • ScreenDaily
Nancy Buirski [pictured], Valeria Golino and Hernán Musaluppi to decide on the Best First Feature Award; 18 films are in contention.

Berlinale has unveiled the three-person jury for its Best First Feature Award.

Us director and producer Nancy Buirski, Italian actress and director Valeria Golino and Argentinian producer Hernán Musaluppi will decide the award, with the winner announced at the official award ceremony in the Berlinale Palast on Feb 15.

The award comes with a €50,000 prize, donated by the Gwff, and will be split between the producer and director of the winning film, while the director will also be awarded with a high-quality viewfinder.

A total of 18 directorial debuts have been nominated by the heads of the Competition, Panorama, Forum, Generation and Perspektive Deutsches Kino section.

They are:

Competition

´71 - United Kingdom

By Yann Demange

With Jack O’Connell, Sean Harris, Richard Dormer

Historia del miedo (History of Fear) – Argentina / Uruguay / Germany / France

By Benjamin Naishtat

With Jonathan Da Rosa, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin completes Panorama line-up

  • ScreenDaily
A total of 24 world premieres are included in the Berlinale’s Panorama selection, which has added a number of Asian productions.

Some 36 films from 29 countries will feature in the Panorama section of the Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 6-16), of which 24 will be world premieres.

Most recently invited are works from Norway, Ethiopia, Mexico, India, Iran, Georgia, Greece, Hungary and Austria – with returning filmmakers Elfi Mikesch and Umut Dağ, who opened Panorama 2012 with Kuma, his directorial debut.

New titles include a number of Asian productions. In Ieji (Homeland) by Japan’s Nao Kubota, a farmer’s son, who first fled to the city, explores his home village in the Fukushima district, an area that is actually still a no-go zone following the disaster at the region’s nuclear power plant.

In the South Korean film Night Flight, LeeSong Hee-il presents a duel between two schoolmates. LeeSong previously showed the films No Regret and White Night in Panorama
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin Film Festival’s Panorama Section Completes Lineup

Berlin Film Festival’s Panorama Section Completes Lineup
London — The Berlin Film Festival’s Panorama section, which is devoted to art-house cinema, with a particular focus on auteur movies, has completed its lineup of fiction pics. It includes 24 world premieres.

The selection has a strong Asian contingent, with several titles from the continent added.

Panorama’s main program will open on Feb. 6 with a Vietnamese sci-fi pic, “2030.” In Nghiem-Minh Nguyen-Vo’s film, the ocean levels have risen and the land of many farmers is now under water. Vegetables are cultivated on floating farms, a catastrophic situation from which global corporations want to profit.

Nao Kubota’s “Homeland” follows a farmer’s son from the Fukushima district of Japan, who has fled to the city. He returns to his home village, which lies in a no-go zone following the nuclear disaster.

In the South Korean film “Night Flight,” LeeSong Hee-il presents a poignantly unsettling duel between two schoolmates
See full article at Variety - Film News »

DVD Review: 'Goodbye First Love'

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆ French director Mia Hansen-Løve has managed to collate substantial critical goodwill over the course of her short career, thanks in part to the success over her previous film, 2009's Father of My Child. Hansen-Løve returned earlier this year with the loosely autobiographical Goodbye First Love (2011), a more sedate, at times watery account of the fledgling romance between 15-year-old Camille (rising star Lola Créton) and her slightly older boyfriend Sullivan (Sebastian Urzendowsky).

Read more »
See full article at CineVue »

Goodbye First Love DVD Review

Director: Mia Hansen-Løve

Starring: Lola Créton, Sebastian Urzendowsky, Magne-Håvard Brekke

Running Time: 110 minutes

Certificate: 15

Synopsis: Camille (Créton) and Sullivan (Urzendowsky) are young and very much in love. As they become adults, life forces them apart, and they embark upon their own personal journeys. When Sullivan returns from several years of travelling to find Camille has a new life with Lorenz (Brekke), they reunite and reminisce, but conflicting emotions run high, ensuring difficult life lessons lay ahead.

Hansen-Løve’s third feature film is, once again, a painstakingly naturalistic depiction of real people who lead real lives. The slow pace and minimal use of dialogue forces you to engage with the characters, especially Camille, on a much deeper level, as you scrutinize every movement and gesture, in order to understand what she is thinking and how she is feeling at any given moment.

The dialogue that does materialize, is rousingly declamatory, but seeps into mawkishness at times.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Amour de jeunesse’ is a lovingly put together film

Un amour de jeunesse (English title: Goodbye First Love)

directed by Mia Hansen-Løve

Written by Mia Hansen-Løve

France/Germany, 2011

There is a common belief among many people that one’s first love is the one remembered most vividly. It is the one that shapes us the most, that taught us the most, and so on and so forth. The exuberance of finding love for the first time is clearly a pivotal moment in everyone’s lives, in particular if that love is experienced during the formative teenage years. Just how much control does a person have over the intensity with which that first experience shapes them? What might occur if the focus of one’s affections during that pivotal episode in one’s life re-emerges out of the past? What emotions might emerge and how might they influence that individual’s current life? Such is the subject matter which Mia Hansen-Løve
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Goodbye First Love Review: Frank Look At Young Relationships

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Hollywood’s romantic cinema is quite rightly derided for its sexlessness and its emotional disingenuousness, mistaking Hallmark truisms and cloying, ham-fisted musical montages for real emotional depth. A stereotypical argument it is perhaps, but one which has been proven time and again by the comparative honesty of European cinema’s approach. Goodbye First Love, a passionate and affecting Franco-German drama, offers uncommonly insightful observations of young adult relationships with everything that this entails.

Camille (Lola Créton) and Sullivan (Sebastian Urzendowsky) are young and very much in love. But despite this, their differing expectations are a source of considerable friction; Camille, the younger of the two, favours a dependent, all-encapsulating love, while Sullivan tends towards a more disconnected sense of self-sustainability. When he decides to travel away, Camille feels her life disintegrating, and the two of them, over a sprawling time period, struggle to come to terms with it.
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

This week's new films

American Pie: Reunion (15)

(Jon Hurwitz, Hayden Schlossberg, 2012, Us) Jason Biggs, Seann William Scott, Eugene Levy, Alyson Hannigan. 113 mins

It's rare to see teen-movie characters all grown up, and this illustrates the reason why: they just make us feel old. The gang's all here, reverting to their old non-pc habits even as they mourn their lost youth. It's patchy and often dodgy comedy, but there's still something heartening about Stifler's defiant idiocy and Jim's dad's middle-age second chance.

Safe (15)

(Boaz Yakin, 2012, Us) Jason Statham, Catherine Chan. 94 mins

Triads, Russian mobsters, cops and everyone else in New York falls foul of Statham in another ludicrous but fast-moving actioner.

Two Years At Sea (U)

(Ben Rivers, 2012, UK) Jake Williams. 90 mins

Extraordinary, otherworldly observation of a modern-day Scottish hermit.

Goodbye First Love (15)

(Mia Hansen-Løve, 2011, Fra/Ger) Lola Créton, Sebastian Urzendowsky. 111 mins

Heartfelt study of a young teen's formative romantic fortunes.

The Lucky One (12A)

(Scott Hicks,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Goodbye First Love – review

Mia Hansen-Løve's second film is a clever, persuasive examination of the meaning of first love – and it has a clear streak of autobiography

The 32-year-old film-maker Mia Hansen-Løve began her career acting, notably for Olivier Assayas, whose partner she became. Then, as a director herself, she impressed audiences deeply with her breakthrough feature Father of My Children, in 2009. Un Amour de Jeunesse is a delicate love story, tender and erotic, and drenched in the idealism and seriousness of its central character, Camille (Lola Créton), looking like a very young Penélope Cruz. It is released here under the English title Goodbye First Love, which I think is slightly wrong, pre-empting audience expectations and misreading the film's ambiguity.

This is a fluent, confident and deeply felt movie: unmistakably, if not exactly nakedly, autobiographical. As ever with this kind of personal work, there is an extra pleasure in pondering how and why
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Goodbye First Love

Love stories can go either one of two ways: the long, sweet and syrupy route or the honest, gritty and realistic route. Goodbye First Love takes the latter road and the results are absolutely charming. Spoken in French and subtitled in English, expect to pay close attention to the film’s dialogue. The actors give lovely performances and the lighting and photography are truly gorgeous. Goodbye First Love is a bittersweet tale of romance that sheds light on a very tender subject: young love.

The film begins in Paris 1999 and follows young, sweet Camille (Lola Créton), a 15 year-old girl who has a lustful relationship with a boy named Sullivan (Sebastian Urzendowsky). Their romance is very physical but with sincere moments of tenderness. All of this captured in the first few minutes of the film quite well. They appear naked and chase one another throughout a house. They galavant in the
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Notebook Reviews: Mia Hansen-Løve’s "Goodbye First Love"

  • MUBI
The great Maurice Pialat reportedly claimed to edit his films by paring away all the footage that didn’t strike him as true. This may account for the sustained emotional intensity of his work, his jarring transitions between scenes (it’s rarely easy to gauge how much time passes from one sequence to the next), and the way his movies accurately capture the feeling of being alive even when their content departs from strict realism. A similarly cryptic logic governs Mia Hansen-Løve’s The Father of My Children (2009), a film that portrays both coming-of-age and the legacy of art as a steady accumulation of observations. The movie’s timeframe encompasses about a year, though Hansen-Løve avoids any strategies that may give the story any recognizable pattern. Yes, it’s divided more or less in half, but there’s no marked change in the tone of the storytelling: impactful, even joyous
See full article at MUBI »

In Theaters: 'Marley' Is 'The Lucky One' While We Say 'Goodbye First Love' To 'Think Like A Man' & Peruse 'The Moth Diaries'

  • The Playlist
Spring is here, folks! New love and life are upon us now that the dreary, ice-cold fingers of winter have withdrawn. Loosely translated into the logic of releasing films, this means documentaries and romance melodramas abound! They pop up from studios like daisies from freshly hoed lawns. Head to theaters this weekend and take in the sweet love of soldiers, vampires, Rastafarians, and even chimpanzees. And don’t forget to stop and smell the flowers on your way.

Zac Efron is “The Lucky One” in the adaptation of Nicholas Sparks’ novel opening in theaters this weekend. A marine stationed in Iraq, Efron’s Logan is saved from certain death when a photo of the beautiful Beth (Taylor Schilling) distracts him. Though he originally plans to find and thank her for unknowingly saving his life, Logan ultimately keeps the story to himself once they meet, but hangs around just, well, ‘cause.
See full article at The Playlist »

[Review] Goodbye First Love

  • The Film Stage
The subject of one’s first love is a tricky thing to capture on film. There’s a mystical tint to the days, months, or even years that one spends ensconced in the presence of the first person to whom the word “love” first attaches itself in one’s mind. Places, songs, foods, people, ideas… they all become branded with the name of the person we shared them with, and as such become entwined with the emotional attachments as well.

Goodbye First Love is a film that understands that the concept of a first love is not a simple matter of person and time. It goes far beyond that, and the emotional echoes of those moments will last for long after the relationship itself is over. Love doesn’t die, it just hides and bides its time, waiting for the moment where it can finally remind you of how it felt to be there.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Mending a Broken Heart in 'Goodbye First Love'

  • NextMovie
The French coming-of-age drama "Goodbye First Love" is a film for anyone who's ever had their heart broken. By that, we mean pretty much everyone.

Written and directed by filmmaker-on-the-rise Mia Hansen Love ("The Father of My Children"), "Goodbye First Love" centers on Camille (startling newcomer Lola Creton), a teenager who's head-over-heels in love with her boyfriend Sullivan (Sebastian Urzendowsky).

Although they're only in their teens, Camille believes Sullivan is The One. So you can imagine her state of mind when her man breaks the news that he's been planning a yearlong trip to South America with his buds. She tries her best to make him stay, threatening that her life can't go on without him, but he -- being a young man -- ups and takes off, leaving her devastated.

Lucky for us, our heroine is not beyond repair. Rather than just wallow in her misery, Camille embarks on
See full article at NextMovie »

Goodbye First Love Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Goodbye First Love Movie Review
Title: Goodbye First Love Director: Mia Hansen-Love Starring: Lola Créton, Sebastian Urzendowsky, Magne-Havard Brekke, Valérie Bonneton, Serge Renko, Ozay Fecht, Max Ricat There’s no one way to tell a love story. Often, romances are recounted on the big screen out of order, to present the happiest of times and the low points without explicitly distinguishing the two. Cinematic examples range from Annie Hall to 500 Days of Summer to Peter and Vandy, and many, many more. That tactic effectively captures what makes the relationship work, the spark and the connection, by citing instances of true delight and weaving them into a grander universe in which these two people exist just [ Read More ]
See full article at ShockYa »

Review: Goodbye First Love

We all remember our first kisses and heartbreaks, the alternating agony and ecstasy. Mia Hansen-Løve (All is Forgiven, Father of my Children), the gifted French writer/director tackles the delicate subject head on in Goodbye First Love and the result is one of the most truthful and heartfelt films about first love.Camille (Lola Créton, first seen as a child bride in Catherine Breillat's Bluebeard) and Sullivan (Sebastian Urzendowsky) are a young couple very much in love. Naturally, for Camille, their love is the greatest love ever existed in the history of mankind. So when Sullivan decides to quit school and embark on a journey to self discovery in South America, she is devastated. Their affair ends in Camille's failed suicide attempt.Five years pass by and...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
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