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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 53 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of the 5th New York Film Festival

12 October 2017 6:55 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: Polish poster for The Battle of Algiers (Gillo Pontecorvo, Italy/Algeria, 1965). Designer: Jerzy Flisak.As the 55th New York Film Festival winds down this weekend, I thought I’d look back half a century at the films of the 5th edition. That 1967 festival, programmed by Amos Vogel, Richard Roud, Arthur Knight, Andrew Sarris and Susan Sontag, featured 21 new films, all but three of which were from Europe (six of them from France, 2 and 1/7 of them directed by Godard), all of which showed at Lincoln Center’s Philharmonic Hall. (They also programmed Gance’s Napoleon, Mamoulian’s Applause and King Vidor’s Show People in the retrospective slots). The only director to have a film in both the 1967 festival and the 2017 edition is Agnès Varda, who was one of the directors of the omnibus Far From Vietnam and was then already 12 years into her filmmaking career.It will come as »

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Julie Delpy to Receive Honorary Tribute at 30th European Film Awards

15 September 2017 6:35 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Julie Delpy, the Oscar-nominated French-American writer, filmmaker and actress, will receive the European Achievement in World Cinema award at the 30th European Film Awards in December. The honor recognizes Delpy’s rich and diverse career in front of and behind the camera.

The Paris-born Delpy is best known for her role opposite Ethan Hawke in Richard Linklater’s “Before Sunrise” (1995), “Before Sunset” (2004) and “Before Midnight” (2013), which she co-wrote. Delpy received an Oscar nomination in screenwriting for “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight” (shared with Linklater and Hawke) as well as a Golden Globe nomination for her performance in the latter.

A graduate of Nyu’s Tisch School of the Arts, Delpy has directed, written or acted in more than 30 films. She’s been nominated at the European Film Awards twice, first as an actress in Volker Schlöndorff’s “Homo Faber,” in 1991, and as a director in 2007 with “2 Days in Paris,” which also earned a Cesar nomination. Her »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Telluride 2017. Lineup

31 August 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The RiderThe lineup for the 2017 Telluride Film Festival (September 1st - 4th) has been announced:

Arthur Miller: Writer (Rebecca Miller, U.S.)Battle of the Sexes (Valerie Faris & Jonathan Dayton, U.S.)Darkest Hour (Joe Wright, U.K.)Downsizing (Alexander Payne, U.S.)Eating Animals (Christopher Quinn, U.S.)Faces Places (Agnès Varda & Jr, France)A Fantastic Woman (Sebastián Lelio, Chile/U.S./Germany/Spain)Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (Paul McGuigan, U.K.)First Reformed (Paul Schrader, U.S.)First They Killed My Father (Angelina Jolie, U.S./Cambodia)Foxtrot (Samuel Maoz, Israel)Hostages (Rezo Gigineishvili, Georgia/Russia/Poland)Hostiles (Scott Cooper, U.S.)Human Flow (Ai Weiwei, U.S./Germany)The Insult (Ziad Doueiri, France-Lebanon)Lady Bird (Greta Gerwig, U.S.)Land of the Free (Camilla Magid, Denmark-Finland)Lean on Pete (Andrew Haigh, U.K./U.S)Loveless (Andrey Zvyagintsev, Russia/France/Belgium/Germany)Love, »

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Telluride 2017 Line-up Includes ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ ‘Downsizing,’ and More

31 August 2017 6:08 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Now in its 44th year, Telluride Film Festival provides the launching pad for many of the fall’s biggest films and, as usual, we don’t know the line-up until right before it kicks off. Beginning this Friday, they’ve now unveiled the full slate, which features much of the expected players — new films from Guillermo del Toro, Greta Gerwig, Alexander Payne, Joe Wright, and Todd Haynes — as well as the latest work from Paul Schrader, Andrew Haigh, Agnes Varda, Ken Burns, Errol Morris, and more.

Check out the line-up below.

Arthur Miller: Writer (d. Rebecca Miller, U.S., 2017)

Battle Of The Sexes (d. Valerie Faris, Jonathan Dayton, U.S., 2017)

Darkest Hour (d. Joe Wright, U.K., 2017)

Downsizing (d. Alexander Payne, U.S., 2017)

Eating Animals (d. Christopher Quinn, U.S., 2017)

Faces Places (d. Agnes Varda, Jr, France, 2017)

A Fantastic Woman (d. Sebastián Lelio, Chile-u.S.-Germany-Spain, 2017)

Film Stars Don’T Die In Liverpool (d. »

- Jordan Raup

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Telluride Film Festival Lineup Includes ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Downsizing,’ ‘Shape of Water’

31 August 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Joe Wright’s “Darkest Hour,” Scott Cooper’s “Hostiles,” Angelina Jolie’s “First They Killed My Father,” and Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird” will unspool for audiences at the 44th annual Telluride Film Festival, organizers announced Thursday.

Also set for debuts at the four-day event, unfolding over the Labor Day weekend, are Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris’ “Battle of the Sexes,” starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell; and Paul McGuigan’s “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” with Annette Bening and Jamie Bell.

A number of films set for premieres at the Venice Film Festival will also make the journey to the southwest Colorado ski village, including Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” Andrew Haigh’s “Lean on Pete,” Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed,” and Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing.”

Related

Telluride Film Festival Director on Hidden Gems and a Banner Year for Women

Titles scheduled to finally surface in the States after previous international »

- Kristopher Tapley

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'He was very good as an actor and even better at rewriting scenes' by Anne-Katrin Titze

1 August 2017 12:35 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Volker Schlöndorff on Sam Shepard in Voyager (Homo Faber): 'I was very fond of his performance and I think the movie is memorable because of his presence' The death of Sam Shepard at the age of 73 on July 27, 2017, from complications of motor neurone disease (known as Als in the Us) was announced by a spokesperson for Shepard's family. Shepard starred in Jim Mickle's Cold In July, based on the book by Joe Lansdale. Hampton Fancher, co-screenwriter of Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049, recalls meeting Sam when he was doing The Right Stuff, directed by Philip Kaufman, based on the book by Tom Wolfe.

Volker Schlöndorff, who directed Shepard as Walter Faber, opposite Julie Delpy and Barbara Sukowa, in Voyager, based on Max Frisch's book Homo Faber, with a screenplay by Rudy Wurlitzer, sent the following tribute upon hearing of his passing.

Schlöndorff writes: "Sam was not »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Telluride Film Festival Names Joshua Oppenheimer Guest Director

20 June 2017 9:39 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Telluride Film Festival has selected documentary filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer as its guest director for its 44th festival, running over Labor Day weekend on Sept. 1-4.

Oppenheimer received two Academy Award nominations for best documentary for his 2012 film “The Act of Killing” and 2014’s “The Look of Silence” — both which screened at Telluride. He will select a series of films to be presented at the festival.

“The guest director program is one of the most essential and wonderful parts of our festival,” said executive director Julie Huntsinger. “Joshua has been a part of the show with several of the incredible films he has made in the past, and now as our guest director. His rare combination of intelligence and down-to-earth understanding of humanity will make for a remarkable presentation of films our audience will not want to miss.”

The Look of Silence” premiered at the Venice Film Festival, where it »

- Dave McNary

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One, Two, Three

26 May 2017 5:03 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Some like their comedy hot and some like it cold. Billy Wilder opted to step on the joke accelerator to see what top speed looked like. One of the most finely tuned comedies ever made, this political satire crams five hours’ worth of wit and sight gags into 115 minutes. The retirement-age James Cagney practically blows a fuse rattling through Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond’s high-pressure speeches, without slurring so much as a single syllable.

One, Two, Three

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1961 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 115 min. / Street Date May 30, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring James Cagney, Horst Buchholz, Pamela Tiffin, Arlene Francis,

Howard St. John, Hanns Lothar, Lilo Pulver

Cinematography Daniel L. Fapp

Production Designers Robert Stratil, Heinrich Weidemann

Art Direction Alexander Trauner

Film Editor Daniel Mandell

Original Music André Previn

Written by Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond from the play by Ferenc Molnar

Produced and Directed by Billy Wilder

 

How »

- Glenn Erickson

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Cannes: Medienboard Toasts Festival Films ‘Jupiter’s Moon,’ ‘Western’

25 May 2017 6:45 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

This week saw the Cannes Film Festival reception held by Medienboard, the film funding agency for the Berlin-Brandenburg region of Germany, at the Grand Hotel.

Medienboard chief Kirsten Niehuus gathered together friends and partners to celebrate the films it has backed recently, including Cannes festival films like Kornel Mundruczo’s competition entry “Jupiter’s Moon,” and Valeska Grisebach’s “Western,” which plays in Un Certain Regard.

Among the guests welcomed at the event were Mundruczo, Grisebach, veteran filmmaker Volker Schloendorff, actress Julie Delpy, “Jupiter’s Moon’s” producer Viktoria Petranyi, Stefan Arndt, one of the producers of Michael Haneke’s competition film “Happy End,” Martin Moszkowicz, producer of the “Resident Evil” franchise, and Tom Zickler, Til Schweiger’s regular production partner.

Other guests included actors Louis Hofmann, who appeared in Oscar-nominated “Land of Mine,” Stefan Konarske (“The Young Karl Marx”), Veronica Ferres, and Franz Rogowski, who appears in “Happy End »

- Leo Barraclough

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80 top film-makers sound alarm over EU copyright rules

22 May 2017 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors »

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80 top film-makers demand changes to EU copyright rules

22 May 2017 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors »

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Rudolph Herzog, Maurizio Braucci Projects Boost F&Me Slate (Exclusive)

21 May 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London-based production house Film and Music Entertainment has boosted its slate, including feature directing debuts from German documentarian and author Rudolph Herzog, and “Gomorrah” scribe Maurizio Braucci.

Braucci is teaming with the writer of the Oscar-winner “Ida,” Rebecca Lenkiewicz, on “The Dream Girl,” which will shoot in Italy in October. Francesco Virga at Mir is the Italian producer on the project. Post-production services will be by Windmill Lane, and the film will benefit from Ireland’s Section 481 tax credit.

Herzog, Werner Herzog’s son, is directing “How to Sell a War,” which is completing its financing. The intention is to begin shooting in Georgia later this year.

F&Me is continuing its relationship with Lenkiewicz on “The Disciple,” directed by “Koza” helmer Ivan Ostrochovsky, and written by Lenkiewicz, Marek Lescak and Ostrochovsky. The film looks at the role of the Catholic Church in Czechoslovakia following the 1968 invasion by Soviet troops. »

- Leo Barraclough

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The Handmaid’s Tale, Donnie Darko and The Mephisto Waltz: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video Picks

5 May 2017 11:53 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Last month saw the premiere of Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, a television adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel documenting a future America in which women are oppressed by religious fundamentalists. The series has been garnering a lot of attention and acclaim, but it isn’t the first time filmmakers have tried their hands at Atwood’s dystopian classic; German director Volker Schlöndorff, working from a script by Harold Pinter, brought the book to the screen in 1990. His version of the story was considerably less well received at the time than Hulu’s, but it’s a compelling, distinctive film – one in which […] »

- Jim Hemphill

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Fajr International Film Festival Tehran 35th Anniversary this April

19 April 2017 5:14 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Following the Persian New Year of Nowruz * arrive the eight days of the festival where the last works of great filmmakers such as Andrzej Wajda, Cristian Mongiu, Dardenne brothers, Denis Tanovic, Francois Ozon, Sion Sono, Agnieszka Holland, Aki Kaurismaki, Terrence Malick, Ken Loach and three Iranian Masters of Cinema will screen along with several special sidebars.

For the first time in Fajr International Film Festival, Shadow of Horror Midnight Screenings will host six horror films screening, every night at 11:30 pm in a program designed to entice an unaccustomed Iranian audience’s attention to this genre. Five of the features are from South Korea, Japan, Russia, Poland and Mexico. The sixth, an Iranian feature will have its International Premiere.

At least 68 students from 32 countries as well as 52 students from Iran are to take part in the inspiring, educational film making workshops of the 2017 Fajr. The program is called “Darol Fonoun »

- Sydney Levine

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Stellan Skarsgård and Nina Hoss ‘Return to Montauk’ in First Trailer for Volker Schlöndorff’s Drama

5 April 2017 8:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The Tin Drum director Volker Schlöndorff returned to Berlinale this year to premiere his latest drama, Return to Montauk. Starring Stellan Skarsgård and Nina Hoss (Phoenix), the film follows a writer who, while on a book tour, reconnects with a past flame. While there’s no U.S distribution yet, it’ll hit theaters in France this summer and ahead of the release, the first international trailer has arrived.

Volker Schlöndorff’s latest film has something of the Allen-esque themes of regret and unchangeable fate (the New York setting helps), and perhaps of the relationship dramas of Bergman too,” we said in our review. “And while Return to Montauk doesn’t reach anything like the heights of either of their best work (or indeed Schlöndorff’s own The Tin Drum), it offers a perceptive reflection on a past that can’t be changed and therefore can’t be overcome. Perhaps »

- Jordan Raup

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Berlinale 2017: Return to Montauk Review

20 February 2017 10:19 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

“What I’ve always loved about you, Max…” is a line we hear uttered in Volker Schlondorff’s Return to Montauk – which, unsurprisingly, is a film by an author (the talented Colm Toibin – behind the novel that inspired Brooklyn) about an author. Naturally self-indulgent in parts, the film also suffers from the frustrating trope of having a writer converse with dialogue similar to the words he gets paid to write – rather than talk normally like a normal human being.

Stellan Skarsgard plays Max, embarking on a book tour which leads him to New York City, promoting his latest piece of literature. It’s the city where an old flame resides, and he decides – despite being in a relationship with Clara (Susanne Wolff) – to get back in touch, arriving, uninvited to the workplace of Rebecca (Nina Hoss). Initially she has no intention of seeing him, but as he pleads for her attention, »

- Stefan Pape

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Return To Montauk review [Berlinale]: Dir. Volker Schlondorff (2017)

19 February 2017 9:39 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Return To Montauk review: Volker Schlondorff directs Stellan Skarsgard and Nina Hoss in this slow-moving romantic drama debuting at the 2017 Berlinale.

Return To Montauk review by Paul Heath at the 2017 Berlin Film Festival.

Return To Montauk review

The opening to Return To Montauk sees Stellan Skarsgard deliver an impressive five-minute monologue to camera, a speech about love that has been lost, regrets and Plato, which sets the scene for this bitter-sweet romantic drama.

The film revolves around Skarsgard’s character of Max Zorn,  a sixty-something writer who is visiting New York on a book tour. There, he is reunited with his wife Clara, who is working on the American publication of said novel, a personal tale revolving around a failed love affair. While there, in between readings, Max seeks out German lawyer Rebecca (Nina Hoss), now a native of the city, who is clearly the subject of the novel. It »

- Paul Heath

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Berlin Film Festival: ‘On Body and Soul’ Wins Golden Bear for Best Film

18 February 2017 10:15 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ildikó Enyedi’s Hungarian drama “On Body and Soul” won the Golden Bear for best film at the Berlin Film Festival on Saturday.

Set in a Budapest slaughterhouse, the tender love story follows the burgeoning romance between a shy young women and her similarly quiet older boss as the two discover that they have the same dreams at night.

The international jury, headed by Dutch filmmaker Paul Verhoeven, handed out prizes far and wide, awarding a broad range of international works.

Senegalese filmmaker Alain Gomis’ Kinshasa-based drama “Félicité,” about a strongly independent and passionate singer in the Congolese capital of Kinshasa who is forced to raise money for her son’s operation, won the Silver Bear Grand Jury Prize.

Related

Berlin Film Review: ‘On Body and Soul’

The Silver Bear Alfred Bauer prize for a feature film that opens new perspectives went to Agnieszka Holland’s murder mystery “Spoor.”

Aki Kaurismäki »

- Ed Meza

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‘The Great Wall’ Review: It’s Not Hollywood Whitewashing, It’s Just an Awful Movie

16 February 2017 10:09 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

First, there was that inexplicable half-hour climax in “Transformers: Age of Extinction,” which exported the entire cast to Beijing. Now, Matt Damon’s battling mystical forces in medieval China. Hollywood and China’s terminally awkward shotgun wedding continues with “The Great Wall,” a clunky, effects-riddled blockbuster in which a humorless Damon joins forces with major Chinese director Zhang Yimou for a project that suits neither of their talents. There’s little need for good performances or filmmaking when every scene has been calculated to serve the bottom line.

Assailed in the West for presenting a white savior at the center of an Asian cast, the movie’s racial violations aren’t as egregious as some early critics claimed. Instead, the bland story finds Damon and two other white actors surrounded by a largely Asian cast in a Chinese-approved adventure (where it’s already generating strong, though not blockbuster, box office »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Return to Montauk’ Review: Nina Hoss Excels Opposite Stellan Skarsgård In Volker Schlöndorff’s Chatty Romance — Berlinale 2017

16 February 2017 10:01 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Volker Schlöndorff’s “Return to Montauk” speaks from both sides of its mouth telling two very different tales. Hear it one way, and you’ll get a story of time and regret, an august Euro-drama that asks if love lost can ever be found anew. But come a bit closer, listen past the din, and you’ll hear something entirely different. This time the film is not asking any questions, but flat out saying: Self-delusion is a powerful weapon, and its greatest victims are often those who dare to wield it.

The film’s opening scene offers a helpful key to unlock what then follows. In one long, unbroken take, a man stares right into the camera and tells a story. He speaks of philosophy and of his father, and says that on the older man’s deathbed, he told his son that there are two kinds of regret – regret »

- Ben Croll

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 53 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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