Otto Sander - News Poster

News

Heavenly Harmonies: The Soundtrack of Wim Wenders' "Wings of Desire"

“When a child was a child…”A man’s voice is heard, reading out words as they are written in thick ink on paper.…it didn’t know it was a child”He continues, some of the words delivered in sing-song, joyfully, as if they were a children’s nursery song:“Everything was full of life/And all life was one...”His voice is friendly voice; a comforting voice; a voice that we will soon learn belongs to Damiel (Bruno Ganz), an angel who watches over the city of Berlin and its inhabitants with the curiosity and reverence of a child. Damiel has such deep affection for human life that he is willing to eschew immortality for earthly pleasures and the most intoxicating human experience of all: love. Both Damiel’s voice and those of the humans he consoles and studies feature prominently on the film’s soundtrack, sometimes in isolation,
See full article at MUBI »

The art of adaptation by Anne-Katrin Titze

Diplomacy director Volker Schlöndorff with Anne-Katrin Titze at Lincoln Center on Anton Corbijn's A Most Wanted Man: "Actually, I always compared Niels Arestrup to Philip Seymour Hoffman." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At the 2014 Telluride Film Festival, Volker Schlöndorff was awarded the Silver Medallion and Diplomacy (Diplomatie), starring Niels Arestrup and André Dussollier was screened, as well as Billy, How Did You Do It? (Billy Wilder, Wie Haben Sie's Gemacht?) and Baal starring Rainer Werner Fassbinder. In New York, we discussed his adaptations from The Tin Drum by Günter Grass to Cyril Gely's play Diplomatie and dubbing Dustin Hoffman in German with Otto Sander in Arthur Miller's Death Of A Salesman. Working with Sam Shepard on Voyager, Arestrup's correspondence with Philip Seymour Hoffman in Anton Corbijn's A Most Wanted Man, Bertrand Tavernier's The French Minister and Ralph Fiennes' Max Frisch desires are explored.

Anne-Katrin Titze: As far as adaptations are concerned,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

R.I.P. Otto Sander of Das Boot and Wings Of Desire

The German actor Otto Sander has died at the age of 72, after a long bout with cancer. Renowned for his work on the Berlin stage, both before and after German reunification, Sander was best known to international audiences for his work in two big ‘80s German exports: Wolfgang Peterson’s Das Boot (1981), in which he had a famous drunk scene in a nightclub, and Wim WendersWings Of Desire (1988), as the angel Cassiel, gliding among the earthbound mortals and eavesdropping on their internal monologues, wearing a look of rueful sympathy. He reprised the role of Cassiel in ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Otto Sander obituary

Versatile actor at Berlin's Schaubühne theatre who made films with Wim Wenders and Eric Rohmer

The German actor Otto Sander, who has died aged 72 after suffering from cancer, made his name as one of the members of Peter Stein's Schaubühne theatre in Berlin, where he developed a versatile but precise stage presence that he brought to all kinds of roles. Sander also had more than 100 credits in film and TV productions, most notably Wolfgang Petersen's Das Boot (The Boat, 1981), as a drunk and disillusioned U-boat captain, and Der Himmel über Berlin (Wings of Desire, 1987), as one of the two angels in Wim Wenders's magical survey of the divided city.

Born in Hanover, Sander grew up in Kassel, where he graduated from the Friederichsgymnasium in 1961. He did his military service as a naval reserve officer. In 1965, in his first engagement at the Düsseldorf Kammerspiele, he showed a natural
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Otto Sander ‘Das Boot’ & ‘Wings Of Desire’ Star 1941-2013

German actor Otto Sander has passed away at the age of 72. Although no cause of death has been announced, the actor known for his roles in Wolfgang Peterson’s epic Das Boot and Wim WendersWings Of Desire had been suffering from cancer for some time. Sander’s most famous role saw him as a shell shocked captain of a German U-boat. In Wings Of Desire he played the angel Cassiel, who helped the protagonist on his journey. He returned for the under appreciated sequel, Faraway, So Close! in which he took the lead.

Known for his fantastic deep and gravelly voice, Sander also found a lot of work in dubbing and has provided the German dubs for actors including Dustin Hoffman and Ian McKellen. His voice also lent itself well to narration.

Mayor of Berlin, where Sander was a powerful stage presence, Klaus Wowereit had this to say:

We
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Hawking to open Cambridge Film Festival

  • ScreenDaily
Hawking to open Cambridge Film Festival
Famed scientist Stephen Hawking to present the Stephen Finnigan-directed documentary in Cambridge.

The 33rd Cambridge Film Festival, which runs from September 19-29, is to open with documentary Hawking.

Told in his own words and by those closest to him, the film relays Professor Stephen Hawking’s journey from boyhood underachiever, to PhD genius, to being diagnosed with Motor Neurone disease and given just two years to live. Despite the constant threat of death, Hawking has risen to fame and stardom and continues to make scientific discoveries.

Review: Hawking

The professor, best-selling author (A Brief History of Time) and Cambridge resident will present the film in person on September 19.

Stephen Finnigan, BAFTA-nominated series producer of The Choir: Military Wives, directs the Channel 4 and PBS co-production, which is produced by Darlow Smithson Productions (Dsp).

It received its world premiere at SXSW in March and the UK rights have been secured by Vertigo Films. It is also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The 10 Best Criterion CollectION DVDs

Since 1984, The Criterion Collection has been dedicated to compiling the greatest classic and contemporary films of all time and releasing them in pristine laser disc, DVD and now Blu-Ray editions loaded with extensive supplemental features, extensive essays from an assorted host of acclaimed film critics and, of course, the highest technical picture and audio standards available. Translation? They make the best… and most expensive… DVDs on the market.

All this month in stores and online, Barnes & Noble is offering every title in the Criterion Collection on DVD and Blu-Ray at 50% off. Where to start? For all you aspiring film scholars out there, here's a list of 10 essential Criterion Collection discs, presented in chronological order. Take a look:

The Rules Of The Game (1939)

Directed by Jean Renoir

One of the greatest (and, initially, most controversial) films of all time, Renoir's The Rules of the Game was destroyed during World War II,
See full article at Celebsology »

The 10 Best Criterion CollectION DVDs

  • TVology
Since 1984, The Criterion Collection has been dedicated to compiling the greatest classic and contemporary films of all time and releasing them in pristine laser disc, DVD and now Blu-Ray editions loaded with extensive supplemental features, extensive essays from an assorted host of acclaimed film critics and, of course, the highest technical picture and audio standards available. Translation? They make the best… and most expensive… DVDs on the market.

All this month in stores and online, Barnes & Noble is offering every title in the Criterion Collection on DVD and Blu-Ray at 50% off. Where to start? For all you aspiring film scholars out there, here's a list of 10 essential Criterion Collection discs, presented in chronological order. Take a look:

The Rules Of The Game (1939)

Directed by Jean Renoir

One of the greatest (and, initially, most controversial) films of all time, Renoir's The Rules of the Game was destroyed during World War II,
See full article at TVology »

The 10 Best Criterion CollectION DVDs

Since 1984, The Criterion Collection has been dedicated to compiling the greatest classic and contemporary films of all time and releasing them in pristine laser disc, DVD and now Blu-Ray editions loaded with extensive supplemental features, extensive essays from an assorted host of acclaimed film critics and, of course, the highest technical picture and audio standards available. Translation? They make the best… and most expensive… DVDs on the market.

All this month in stores and online, Barnes & Noble is offering every title in the Criterion Collection on DVD and Blu-Ray at 50% off. Where to start? For all you aspiring film scholars out there, here's a list of 10 essential Criterion Collection discs, presented in chronological order. Take a look:

The Rules Of The Game (1939)

Directed by Jean Renoir

One of the greatest (and, initially, most controversial) films of all time, Renoir's The Rules of the Game was destroyed during World War II,
See full article at Filmology »

Home Media Magazine Presents Its 2010 HD Awards Poll, Wings Of Desire And Gimme Shelter Hold Down The Criterion Front

I think it’s safe to assume that we all love what Criterion is putting out these days, especially those deemed worthy to receive a high definition release on Blu-ray. It’s a given that we also love spreading the good word of Criterion, being that we went so far as to start a podcast and website, to keep the discussion of quality home video releases alive and well.

We also love using our Disc 2 episodes to feature other DVD’s and Blu-ray’s that we find exceptional, and over the past year there have certainly been a lot to talk about.

The fine folks over at Home Media Magazine have unveiled their annual HD Awards, and they want you to weigh in on the best Blu-ray releases from the past year. While I’m sure we’d all like to see that list completely full of discs from the Criterion Collection,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Wings Of Desire—The DVD Review

  • Starlog
Wings Of Desire is a lot like Where The Wild Things Are. Ok, I know that sounds extremely far-fetched, but stick with me here. I know one film involves invisible angels watching humans, their struggles and suffering and the other involves large hirsute monsters with big heads and even bigger tempers making friends with a runaway boy with anger issues, but there are two major common denominators to both films: 1) They’re rooted and invested in human emotions, and 2) Neither adheres to the standard three-act narrative format, forgoing customary cinematic structure and instead drifting and meandering along an (apparently) uncharted course.

I’ve seen Wings Of Desire and Where The Wild Things twice. And in both cases I enjoyed and appreciated the film more after the second viewing, probably because I wasn’t encumbered by expectations of a traditionally told story. Do I think both movies are perfect? No. They
See full article at Starlog »

Blu-Ray Review: Glorious ‘Wings of Desire’ Given Criterion Treatment

Chicago – When true film fans receive the monthly Criterion newsletter, they usually skim it looking for their favorite films. It’s not that Criterion really ever makes bad decisions, but when a personal favorite gets the call, it’s like watching the baseball player you grew up idolizing get inducted into the Hall of Fane. Such is the feeling I get when I look at the Criterion Blu-Ray release of “Wings of Desire,” one of the most lyrically beautiful films ever made.

Blu-Ray Rating: 5.0/5.0

Wim Wenders’ 1987 masterpiece is the filmmaker’s ode to his favorite city, Berlin, using faith and love as its instruments. Some readers may know the story better from the Nicolas Cage remake “City of Angels,” but that film is merely a shadow of one of the most acclaimed works of the last three decades. Bruno Ganz plays Damiel, an angel who wanders the streets of Berlin
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Wings of Desire (The Criterion Collection)

DVD Release Date: Nov. 3 Director: Wim Wenders Writers: Wenders, Peter Handke Cinematographer: Henri Alekan Starring: Bruno Ganz, Otto Sander, Peter Falk, Solveig Dommartin Studio/Run Time: Criterion, 127 mins. Wim Wenders’ masterpiece illuminates the sublime in everyday existence In this 1987 Wim Wenders classic (finally getting the Criterion treatment this month), two angels, Damiel and Cassiel, watch over a divided Berlin. Sometimes they observe from lofty perches, but mostly they move freely through the ordinary lives of the city’s inhabitants, observing and documenting what they see. Occasionally, an angel will put an intangible arm around someone to offer subtle comfort....
See full article at PasteMagazine »

Films You Should See: Wings of Desire

Wings of Desire (Der Himmel über Berlin), Wim Wenders' lyrical hymn to angels over Berlin, is one of the great movies about human empathy. In Wenders' wreck of a Berlin, split in two by the graffiti-covered Berlin Wall, angels are the great sympathizers. Looming in Henri Alekan's silvery black-and-white shots, Damiel (Bruno Ganz) and Cassiel (Otto Sander) have spent eternity in Berlin, clad in long black trenchcoats, strolling, wandering around the crumbling city, serving witness to the city's people. And that is, simply, what they do: they bear witness. Alekan's gentle, precise camera slowly drifts throughout the city, stopping at a circus, the film set for a schlocky Nazi drama, through the windows of an apartment, the exhausted faces of the people on the train, the cacophony of thoughts in the library. Throughout it all, the history and hurt of Berlin's past and present weighs on the characters.
See full article at Tribeca Film »

Blu-ray Review: Wings of Desire (Criterion Collection)

Wim Wenders's Wings of Desire is able to capture your attention despite its sparing plot for the main reason you know its about something even if that something takes its sweet time in fully revealing itself. The film follows two guardian angels, Damiel (Bruno Ganz) and Cassiel (Otto Sander), as they watch over humanity from up high above the streets of Berlin, and, more often than not, at street level.

As they walk the streets, an often visited library and ride the trains we listen in on the thoughts of others as those Damiel and Cassiel encounter can be heard. However, their thoughts don't come across as a string of cohesive sentences as much as they are fragments of ideas, occasionally offering something of substance, but most often an example of the mundane. To that effect you could say Wings of Desire is about just that, an appreciation for the simpler things in life,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Wings of Desire: Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review

Wim Wenders' Wings of Desire (Der Himmel uber Berlin) centers around two guardian angels, Damiel (Bruno Ganz) and Cassiel (Otto Sander). The duo .alongside other angels- act as witnesses to all that takes place around them on Earth (the streets of 1987 West Berlin, to be precise). Moving invisibly through the haunted city, they observe, collect and share people's thoughts, dreams, memories and fears with each other. After an eternity of observing, Damiel begins to ponder the possibility of becoming mortal, and when he encounters and falls for a lonely trapeze artist named Marion (Solveig Dommartin), he decides to take the plunge and become human.

Until Damiel makes that leap, nearly two-thirds into the movie's 127-minute running time, there really isn't much of a structured plot to speak of in Wings of Desire. The film is more of a reflection on the human condition, expressed through a series of sequences of inner monologues.
See full article at TheHDRoom »

Criterion's October Blu-ray Slate Includes Wings of Desire

Criterion has announced a trio of films that will join their Blu-ray Disc Criterion Collection with all new filmmaker approved high definition transfers this October. The first film, Mira Nair's Monsoon Wedding, will be released on October 13 with 5.1 DTS-hd Master Audio. A week later on October 20 will see the release of staff favorite Wings of Desire, also with 5.1 DTS-hd Master Audio, and Howards End with Helena Bonham Carter and uncompressed 5.1 Dolby Digital audio. Complete disc specs for each release are as follows: Wings of Desire

New, restored high-definition digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Wim Wenders Audio commentary featuring Wenders and actor Peter Falk The Angels Among Us (2003), a documentary featuring interviews with Wenders, Falk, actors Bruno Ganz and Otto Sander, writer Peter Handke, and composer Jürgen Knieper Excerpt from "Wim Wenders Berlin Jan. 87," an episode of the French television program Cinéma cinémas, including on-set footage Interview with
See full article at TheHDRoom »

Baumbauer to receive lifetime Lola

BERLIN -- Veteran talent agent Erna Baumbauer, locally known as the Queen of Bavaria for her benevolent reign over the German film industry, will be presented with a lifetime achievement award at this year's German Film Awards, known as the Lolas. Baumbauer has been a central force in the German film scene for decades, discovering and promoting some of the country's biggest stars, including Bruno Ganz (Downfall), Otto Sander (Wings of Desire), Maximillian Schell (Judgement at Nuremberg) and Katja Riemann (Rosenstrasse). At 87, Baumbauer isn't slowing down. She still runs her eponymous agency, one of Germany's largest, out of Munich.

See also

Credited With | External Sites