Gene Saks - News Poster

News

‘Our Souls at Night’ Trailer: Robert Redford and Jane Fonda Feel the Love

‘Our Souls at Night’ Trailer: Robert Redford and Jane Fonda Feel the Love
Robert Redford and Jane Fonda are working together for the fourth time in their careers. They most famously starred in Gene SaksBarefoot in the Park, but they first appeared together in Arthur Penn’s The Chase. In 1979, they both starred in The Electric Horseman. Next month, we can see the two acting titans back together in a […]

The post ‘Our Souls at Night’ Trailer: Robert Redford and Jane Fonda Feel the Love appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘Our Souls at Night’ Teaser: Robert Redford and Jane Fonda Reunite for the First Time in 38 Years

‘Our Souls at Night’ Teaser: Robert Redford and Jane Fonda Reunite for the First Time in 38 Years
It’s amazing to think it’s been fifty years since these two legends first graced the screen together, in Neil Simon’s “Barefoot in the Park” (1967), directed by Gene Saks. Now, they’re revisiting that crackling chemistry for a literary adaptation about finding love in one’s autumnal years.

Read More:‘Our Souls at Night’ First Look: Robert Redford and Jane Fonda Canoodle in Netflix Romance

Per the official synopsis: “Based on the best-selling novel written by Kent Haruf and adapted for the screen by Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber (“The Fault in Our Stars”), Our Souls at Night is set in Colorado and begins when Addie Moore (Jane Fonda) pays an unexpected visit to a neighbor, Louis Waters (Robert Redford). Her husband died years ago, as did his wife, and in such a small town they’d been neighbors for decades, but had little contact. Their children
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Posters of Stanislav Vajce

  • MUBI
Above: Czech poster for Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, Italy, 1968).As I’m sure I’ve said before, the world of Czech movie posters is never less than an embarrassment of riches. I keep discovering new artists that I was never aware of previously, all with an impressive body of work behind them. The other day, as I was looking through the new acquisitions of my favorite poster shop, Posteritati, I came across this striking poster for Once Upon a Time in the West: a fascinating combination of bold color, eccentric collage, pop art elements and unusual typography. I wasn’t aware of the name of Stanislav Vajce before that but a quick search on the store's website and elsewhere revealed a wild array of some of the most exciting and inventive Czech posters I have seen in a while. As with so many of
See full article at MUBI »

Robert Redford and Jane Fonda are Barefoot In The Park Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe

“Paul, I think I’m gonna be a lousy wife. But don’t be angry with me. I love you very much – and I’m very sexy!”

Barefoot In The Park screens at St. Louis’ fabulous Hi-Pointe Theater this weekend as part of their Classic Film Series. It’s Saturday, February 11th at 10:30am at the Hi-Pointe located at 1005 McCausland Ave., St. Louis, Mo 63117. The film will be introduced by Harry Hamm, movie reviewer for Kmox. Admission is only $5

Romantic comedies don’t come much lighter than Barefoot In The Park, an early Neil Simon confection based on the early days of his first marriage. The youthful, fresh-faced pair of Robert Redford and Jane Fonda play Paul and Corie Bratter, hot-to-trot newlyweds who after spending seven passion-filled nights at the Plaza, find the everyday trials and tribulations of marriage rather rough going. Corie has secured them a sixth-floor walk-up
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

How Bea Arthur Gave Back to the Gays Who Loved Her

How Bea Arthur Gave Back to the Gays Who Loved Her
Back in the early 1970s, when she was playing the outspoken lead on Norman Lear’s All in the Family spin-off, Maude, Bea Arthur would host raucous dinner parties at her Los Angeles home. The guests were by and large gay men — closeted, as most were back then — who were drawn to Arthur, like moths to a porch light. Observing these drunken evenings with fascination was Arthur's then-11-year-old son, Matthew Saks, the elder of two boys she adopted with her second husband, the film and theater director Gene Saks. "They were always excited to come to

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

2-Time Oscar Winner Blanchett to Play 4-Time Emmy Winner Ball: Good Idea?

Lucille Ball: The glamour look. Cate Blanchett to play Lucille Ball: Actress won Oscar for incarnating Ball's fellow Rko contract player Katharine Hepburn Two-time Oscar winner Cate Blanchett is reportedly slated to star in a biopic of former Rko and MGM actress and big-time television comedienne Lucille Ball. Aaron Sorkin, Oscar winner for David Fincher's The Social Network, will be responsible for the screenplay. According to Entertainment Weekly, the Lucille Ball film biopic will focus on Ball's two-decade marriage to her I Love Lucy costar Desi Arnaz. In 1960, the couple had an acrimonious divorce that supposedly “shocked” clueless fans unable to tell the difference between TV reality and real-life reality. Their children, Desi Arnaz Jr. and Lucie Arnaz, had modest acting careers in film and on TV in the '70s and '80s. As per the EW.com report, they're both producing the planned Lucille Ball biopic.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Broadway Will Dim Lights In Memory Of Director Gene Saks

Broadway Will Dim Lights In Memory Of Director Gene Saks
Updated, March 31: Broadway will dim its lights for one minute on Wednesday, April 1 at 7:45 P.M., in memory of Gene Saks, the film and Broadway director who died on Saturday at 93. Updated, Sunday noon with more information throughout. Gene Saks, an actor-turned-director whose long kinship with Neil Simon led to the film versions of two of the most successful comedies of their time, Barefoot In The Park (1967) and The Odd Couple, and whose screen performances include…
See full article at Deadline »

Daily | [in]Transition, Oppenheimer, Lang

The first peer-reviewed issue of [in]Transition features the likes of Adrian Martin and Kevin B. Lee on a total of four outstanding audiovisual essays on cinema. Also in today’s roundup of news and views: a guide to Stanley Kubrick’s lenses, a forthcoming book on The Shining, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Fritz Lang’s Spies, Colin Beckett’s critique of the work of Joshua Oppenheimer, Errol Morris and Jill Godmilow; interviews with Alex Gibney and Charles Grodin; and remembering Gene Saks, cinematographer Miroslav Ondrícek and Italian actor Rik Battaglia. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | [in]Transition, Oppenheimer, Lang

The first peer-reviewed issue of [in]Transition features the likes of Adrian Martin and Kevin B. Lee on a total of four outstanding audiovisual essays on cinema. Also in today’s roundup of news and views: a guide to Stanley Kubrick’s lenses, a forthcoming book on The Shining, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Fritz Lang’s Spies, Colin Beckett’s critique of the work of Joshua Oppenheimer, Errol Morris and Jill Godmilow; interviews with Alex Gibney and Charles Grodin; and remembering Gene Saks, cinematographer Miroslav Ondrícek and Italian actor Rik Battaglia. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Actor and Tony Award-winning director Gene Saks dies, aged 93

Actor and Tony Award-winning director Gene Saks dies, aged 93
Gene Saks has passed away, aged 93.

The actor and director, who starred in such films as A Thousands Clowns, died of pneumonia in his Long Island home yesterday (March 29).

A Tony Award-winning director, he famously staged Neil Simon's 'double-b' trilogy, which consisted of Brighton Beach Memoirs, Biloxi Blues, and Broadway Bound, and also a revival of The Odd Couple in 1985.

He starred in 1994's Fool alongside Paul Newman, Bruce Willis and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

The last Broadway play Saks directed was William Luce's Barrymore in 1997.

Saks is survived by his wife Keren.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Gene Saks, Tony-Winning Stage and Film Director, Dies at 93

Gene Saks, Tony-Winning Stage and Film Director, Dies at 93
Gene Saks, a director who earned three Tony Awards and frequently collaborated with Neil Simon, has died. He was 93. Saks died March 28 following a bout with pneumonia, his wife, Keren, said, according to the New York Times.  Saks had a long-standing professional relationship with Simon and directed many of his plays, including Brighton Beach Memoirs (1983) and Biloxi Blues (1985). Both projects earned Saks a Tony for directing, as did the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical I Love My Wife (1977). Read More Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2015 Other Simon plays staged by Saks include Half a Sixpence (1965),

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93
Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

DVD Review: "The Odd Couple" (1968) Starring Jack Lemmon And Walter Matthau; 2-dvd Paramount Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
Retro-active: The Best From Cinema Retro's Archives

By Lee Pfeiffer

Paramount has released a 2 disc special edition of the 1968 comedy classic The Odd Couple as part of the studio's Centennial Collection. The film retains all of its initial appeal, despite the fact that virtually every baby boomer has committed the scenes and dialogue to memory. Although most people regard this as the first historic pairing of Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau, in fact, that occurred with Billy Wilder's 1965 gem The Fortune Cookie which saw Matthau winning the Oscar for supporting actor. The genius behind the story, of course, is Neil Simon, who adapted his smash hit Broadway play for the film. The part of Felix Unger was originally played on Broadway by the great Art Carney, but Lemmon was a much hotter box-office property and got the role in the feature film. The film is creative in the ways
See full article at CinemaRetro »

365 Days, 100 Films #76 - The Odd Couple (1968)

The Odd Couple, 1968.

Directed by Gene Saks.

Starring Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau, John Fiedler, Herb Edelman, David Sheiner and Larry Haines.

Synopsis:

One untidy, unorganised divorcee moves in with a tidy, organised divorcee.

“307,” the hotel clerk tells Felix Ungar (Jack Lemmon) as he passes him the room key. “Have you got anything a little higher?” replies Felix. The hotel clerk shares a bemused look with the other person on the front desk. Felix cuts a pretty dejected figure, his face hanging like a wet, sagging towel on a washing line. “914?” the hotel clerk suggests. Felix takes the key and wonders to the elevator. It’s out of service.

Felix’s wife has just broken up with him. His children, apartment and her were his entire life. A photo of each is kept in his wallet. Know anyone else who has a photo of their front room in his wallet? That
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

“Just Go With It” Star Brooklyn Decker Claims She Would Have Done It For Free

  • ReelRave
Currently in theaters, Just Go With It is a contemporary re-imagining of the 1969 Academy Award-winner Cactus Flower. Originally directed by Gene Saks and starring Walter Matthau, Ingrid Bergman and Goldie Hawn, this new version is helmed by director Dennis Dugan and features a cast that includes Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston and Brooklyn Decker. A veteran of only a handful of [...]
See full article at ReelRave »

Free Flick Fridays: Brighton Beach Memoirs

Brighton Beach Memoirs Dir. Gene Saks (1986) Brighton Beach Memoirs was the first play in Neil Simon's Eugene Trilogy, which followed the autobiographical exploits of a nice kid growing up middle class and Jewish in the titular nabe. Matthew Broderick originated the role of Eugene on Broadway, which made him a star, and he was busy on the Great White Way in Biloxi Blues when the inevitable film version came around. So subbing for Broderick in Saks' film is the actor Jonathan Silverman (Weekend at Bernie's), whose relatable neurosis carries over into the tale of a fifteen-year-old boy in 1937 who loves girls, would like to have sex at some point, and also loves baseball. With uberWASP Blythe Danner (mother of Gwyneth Paltrow, of course, who visited Brighton Beach in Two Lovers, er, as a Wasp) as the Jewish mother whose presence guilts the boy into future success. It's heartwarming, relateable stuff,
See full article at Tribeca Film »

Free Flick Fridays: Brighton Beach Memiors

Brighton Beach Memoirs Dir. Gene Saks (1986) Brighton Beach Memoirs was the first play in Neil Simon's Eugene Trilogy, which followed the autobiographical exploits of a nice kid growing up middle class and Jewish in the titular nabe. Matthew Broderick originated the role of Eugene on Broadway, which made him a star, and he was busy on the Great White Way in Biloxi Blues when the inevitable film version came around. So subbing for Broderick in Saks' film is the actor Jonathan Silverman (Weekend at Bernie's), whose relatable neurosis carries over into the tale of a fifteen-year-old boy in 1937 who loves girls, would like to have sex at some point, and also loves baseball. With uberWASP Blythe Danner (mother of Gwyneth Paltrow, of course, who visited Brighton Beach in Two Lovers, er, as a Wasp) as the Jewish mother whose presence guilts the boy into future success. It's heartwarming, relateable stuff,
See full article at Tribeca Film »

Golden Girls Pay Tribute To Arthur

  • WENN
Golden Girls Pay Tribute To Arthur
Veteran actresses Betty White and Rue McClanahan have paid tribute to their Golden Girls co-star Bea Arthur, who died on Saturday.

The actress passed away peacefully in her sleep at her Los Angeles home after losing her battle with cancer aged 86, according to personal assistant Dan Watt.

Arthur, who starred in the hit show from 1985 until 1992, won an Emmy Award for her role as Dorothy Zbornak in the sitcom, which chronicled the lives of three retirees in Miami.

And co-stars White and McClanahan fondly recall the seven happy years they spent with Arthur on the series.

McClanahan tells Entertainment Tonight. "(Thirty-seven) years ago she showed me how to be very brave in playing comedy. I'll miss that courage. And I'll miss that voice."

White adds, "I knew it would hurt, I just didn't know it would hurt this much. I'm so happy that she received her Lifetime Achievement Award while she was still with us, so she could appreciate that.

"Bea was such an important part of a very happy time in my life and I have dearly loved her for a very long time. How lucky I was to know her."

Born in 1922, Arthur grew up in New York and earned a degree as a medical laboratory technician, before enrolling in a drama course at the New School of Social Research in the city.

She shot to fame in her twenties with numerous stage roles and won critical acclaim for her performance in a 1964 production of Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway.

Arthur also landed a Tony Award for her turn as Vera Charles in 1966 musical Mame - and composer Jerry Herman was taken aback by her natural acting ability and comic timing.

He says, "There was no one else like Bea. She would make us laugh during Mame rehearsals with a look or with a word. She didn't need dialogue. I don't know if I can say that about any other person I ever worked with."

The actress moved on to television in her fifties and won the starring role in 1970s show Maude, for which she also won a coveted Emmy Award, before landing her part in The Golden Girls.

Arthur married twice - first to producer and director Robert Alan Aurthur and then to director Gene Saks from 1950 to 1978. The couple adopted two sons.

She is survived by a sister, her children Matthew and Daniel and two granddaughters.

Bea Arthur was a true 'Golden Girl'

Bea Arthur, who died Saturday at 86, was the winner of two Emmy Awards for her starring roles on classic sitcoms "Maude" and "The Golden Girls." Before becoming an unexpected TV star in the 1970s, Bea Arthur enjoyed a long and celebrated career in the theater. She won a Tony Award for featured actress in a musical in 1966 for the role of Vera Charles, bosom buddy to "Mame." Married at the time to theater director Gene Saks, who helmed this tuner adaptation of the play "Auntie Mame," Arthur made no secret of the fact that she would have loved to play the part of the glamourous title character, a part that went to Angela Lansbury. With her basso voice and deadpan delivery, Arthur had to settle for the sidekick role, which turned out to be a natural for her — the man-eating, gin-drinking actress Vera. When the movie version was made in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bea Arthur Dies at Age 86

Over the past 15 months or so, it's been our sad duty to report about more deaths in Hollywood than we've cared to—it seems as though entertainment personalities have been falling faster than leaves on an autumn day. In fact, the entire past 15 months have felt like one long autumn, if we're honest.

And it's happened again. Those of you who fondly remember The Golden Girls, or if you want to go back a bit further into the '70s, Maude, will be sorry to learn that Bea Arthur has died of cancer at the age of 86.

Spokesman Dan Watt said that Arthur died Saturday morning at her home in Los Angeles, her family by her side.

It's likely Arthur will be best remembered for her role in Maude. Arthur's comic timing and deadpan delivery became legendary shortly after her opinionated and irascible Maude first appeared on Norman Lear's
See full article at CinemaSpy »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites