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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 1997 | 1996 | 1994

16 items from 2017


More Gay Stars and Directors and Screenwriters on TCM: From psychos and psychiatrists to surfers and stage mamas

22 June 2017 6:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

On the day a U.S. appeals court lifted an injunction that blocked a Mississippi “religious freedom” law – i.e., giving Christian extremists the right to discriminate against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, etc. – not to mention the publication of a Republican-backed health care bill targeting the poor, the sick, the elderly, and those with “pre-existing conditions” – which would include HIV-infected people, a large chunk of whom are gay and bisexual men, so the wealthy in the U.S. can get a massive tax cut, Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride or Lgbt Month celebration continues (into tomorrow morning, Thursday & Friday, June 22–23) with the presentation of movies by or featuring an eclectic – though seemingly all male – group: Montgomery Clift, Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, Dirk Bogarde, John Schlesinger, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Arthur Laurents, and Jerome Robbins. After all, one assumes that, rumors or no, the presence of Mercedes McCambridge in one »

- Andre Soares

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Roger Smith Dies: ‘Auntie Mame’ And ‘77 Sunset Strip’ Star Was 84

5 June 2017 4:16 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Roger Smith, who achieved semi-stardom as the adult Patrick Dennis opposite Rosalind Russell in 1958’s Auntie Mame and TV icon status opposite Efrem Zimbalist Jr. in ABC’s hip, hit detective series 77 Sunset Strip, died Sunday at Sherman Oaks Hospital, the hospital confirmed this afternoon. He was 84 and had recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of his marriage to actress Ann-Margret. No cause of death was given, but Smith had been diagnosed in 1980 with myasthenia… »

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Roger Smith Dies: ‘Auntie Mame’ And ‘77 Sunset Strip’ Star Was 84

5 June 2017 4:16 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Roger Smith, who achieved semi-stardom as the adult Patrick Dennis opposite Rosalind Russell in 1958’s Auntie Mame and TV icon status opposite Efrem Zimbalist Jr. in ABC’s hip, hit detective series 77 Sunset Strip, died Sunday at Sherman Oaks Hospital, the hospital confirmed this afternoon. He was 84 and had recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of his marriage to actress Ann-Margret. No cause of death was given, but Smith had been diagnosed in 1980 with myasthenia… »

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Lgbt Pride Month: TCM Showcases Gay and Lesbian Actors and Directors

1 June 2017 5:40 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Considering everything that's been happening on the planet in the last several months, you'd have thought we're already in November or December – of 2117. But no. It's only June. 2017. And in some parts of the world, that's the month of brides, fathers, graduates, gays, and climate change denial. Beginning this evening, Thursday, June 1, Turner Classic Movies will be focusing on one of these June groups: Lgbt people, specifically those in the American film industry. Following the presentation of about 10 movies featuring Frank Morgan, who would have turned 127 years old today, TCM will set its cinematic sights on the likes of William Haines, James Whale, George Cukor, Mitchell Leisen, Dorothy Arzner, Patsy Kelly, and Ramon Novarro. In addition to, whether or not intentionally, Claudette Colbert, Colin Clive, Katharine Hepburn, Douglass Montgomery (a.k.a. Kent Douglass), Marjorie Main, and Billie Burke, among others. But this is ridiculous! Why should TCM present a »

- Andre Soares

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8 classic feminist movies well ahead of their time

29 April 2017 1:21 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Jennifer Leigh Williamson Jun 13, 2017

As far back as the 1920s, cinema has brought us feminist heroes. Here's a bunch of films way ahead of their time...

“I never realised until lately that women were supposed to be the inferior sex.” - Katharine Hepburn

Feminism, equality of the sexes. Often when watching old movies, the sexism of the time can catch you off guard. Bums are pinched, bimbos bounce, old maids glower and you shake your head and sigh, glad that those times have (mostly) passed. So when we see classic films with strong, intelligent, impressive, witty, ambitious, feminist female characters, equals to their male counterparts, we sit up and take notice. There are many great classic films with impressive female characters, too many to list here. This article is about the characters that have inspired me personally. Classic feminist films way ahead of their time.

Spoilers ahead...

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc »

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‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: Alison Wright On How Her Fictional Character May Fare Better Than Real Women in Film

28 March 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If your favorite “Feud: Bette and Joan” character is Pauline, Alison Wright gets it.

“I kind of love her too,” she told IndieWire. “She’s a strong, assertive, capable, able woman, and not a victim in any sort of sense. She’s got her head screwed on pretty tight. Ryan [Murphy] initially described her as being whip-smart and cool as a cucumber, so that’s an attractive concept right there.”

Read More: ‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made

Wright first became familiar to FX audiences as another 20th century secretary, “poor Martha” of “The Americans.” But the two characters couldn’t be further apart. As the loyal and clever assistant to director Robert Aldrich (played in the show by Alfred Molina), Pauline represents a rare breed of Hollywood women for the year 1962 — an aspiring director, who in this week’s episode has the »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: Alison Wright On How Her Fictional Character May Fare Better Than Real Women in Film

28 March 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

If your favorite “Feud: Bette and Joan” character is Pauline, Alison Wright gets it.

“I kind of love her too,” she told IndieWire. “She’s a strong, assertive, capable, able woman, and not a victim in any sort of sense. She’s got her head screwed on pretty tight. Ryan [Murphy] initially described her as being whip-smart and cool as a cucumber, so that’s an attractive concept right there.”

Read More: ‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Main Titles: How That Striking Vintage Opening Sequence Got Made

Wright first became familiar to FX audiences as another 20th century secretary, “poor Martha” of “The Americans.” But the two characters couldn’t be further apart. As the loyal and clever assistant to director Robert Aldrich (played in the show by Alfred Molina), Pauline represents a rare breed of Hollywood women for the year 1962 — an aspiring director, who in this week’s episode has the »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Guest Post: When a Woman Called the Shots at the Screen Writers Guild

14 March 2017 1:32 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mary C. McCall Jr. with Maisie doll: Dwight Franklin

Guest Post by J.E. Smyth

Current debates in the media about women’s employment, representation, and visibility in Hollywood focus — perhaps predictably — on stars’ pay and the number of active female directors. Yet there’s also a sense that, however unequal the situation is now, things must have been far worse for women working in the film industry sixty, seventy, or eighty years ago under the studio system — and that women should be grateful for some small improvements.

How very far from the truth this is.

In 1942, the year Bette Davis and Katharine Hepburn earned higher salaries than President Roosevelt, the Screen Writers Guild elected a new president — Mary C. McCall Jr. She would be elected three times (1942–43, 1943–44, 1951–52), and for two decades was one of the most articulate and powerful advocates for screenwriters and their union. Before McCall came on the scene and helped broker the first contract with the producers, it was well known up and down Hollywood that the average writer made less per week than a secretary.

McCall worked to get the screenwriting profession its first minimum wage, unemployment compensation, minimum flat-price deals, maximum working hours, credit arbitration, and pay raises during WWII.

She specialized in films about women and was proud of it. She was less happy working at Warner Bros. In 1936, on loan out to Columbia, she was on the set every day working with director Dorothy Arzner, star Rosalind Russell, and editor Viola Lawrence on “Craig’s Wife.” It was Arzner who persuaded her to fight the misogynist atmosphere at Warner Bros. and commit to a serious career as a writer.

Two years later, she moved to MGM and crafted the sleeper hit of the year, “Maisie.” Ann Sothern’s never-say-die working woman became a cultural phenomenon and was one of the industry’s most successful franchises. During the war, McCall headed the Hollywood branch of the War Activities Committee, the Committee of Hollywood Guild and Unions, and the Screen Writers Guild.

But, being Hollywood’s top organization woman was only one part of her life. At the height of her career, she had and raised four children with two different husbands. She famously gave birth to twins 24 hours after her last story conference on 1935’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” She was a firm believer in the Equal Rights Amendment, and a lifelong Roosevelt Democrat. Hollywood producers destroyed her career when she stood up against Howard Hughes and Rko pictures when they denied Communist writer Paul Jarrico credit on “The Las Vegas Story” during the blacklist.

You won’t find any of this in academic or popular histories of Hollywood. These days, she’s all but forgotten, while Dalton Trumbo and the other male Hollywood Ten are remembered and even get biopic makeovers.

Things are changing.

On March 16, the Writers Guild Foundation will be honoring McCall’s life and legacy with a 35mm screening of “Craig’s Wife” — which is still not available to the public on DVD — and “Reward Unlimited,” a 10-minute documentary short she wrote about women’s war work which hasn’t been screened since 1944. After the screenings, McCall’s daughters, television writer Mary-David Sheiner and former Los Angeles Times film critic Sheila Benson, will sit down with me to discuss McCall’s career. The reception and event, held at the WGA theatre in Beverly Hills, are free.

When McCall came to Hollywood in the 1930s, women’s membership in the Screen Writers Guild hovered between 20 and 25 percent and was nearer a third during the war. But membership plunged for women in the 1960s down to the teens and shrunk further in the ’80s and ’90s. Since the millennium, numbers have slowly increased. Now, 24.9 percent of women are film guild members, but far fewer women writers are being hired for major productions now than the norm seventy or eighty years ago.

Why should we remember Mary C. McCall Jr.? Because she believed in women’s careers; because she believed in the importance of a union; because negotiation, compromise, and political moderation made her and her profession powerful. She is a role model to be reckoned with. And she proved two other things: that Hollywood’s women could call the shots in their careers and that seventy-five years ago, a woman could be president…

J. E. Smyth is Professor of History at the University of Warwick (UK) and the author of several books on American cinema, including “Edna Ferber’s Hollywood” and the BFI Classics volume on “From Here to Eternity.” Her book on Hollywood’s many high-powered career women — starring Mary McCall — will be published later this year by Oxford University Press.

Guest Post: When a Woman Called the Shots at the Screen Writers Guild was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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Buffy Turns 20: 22 Things You Never Knew About Everyone’s Favorite Slayer

10 March 2017 8:00 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Get ready to feel as old, ’90s kids: Buffy the Vampire Slayer premiered 20 years ago today.

The beloved series, which cemented Sarah Michelle Gellar‘s place in pop culture history, continues to serve as a favorite among fans with an affinity for high school dramas and regular vampire showdowns.

It’s hard to imagine a TV landscape without the benefit of the show’s landmark run — creator Joss Whedon and Gellar pushed a strong female lead into a world of supernatural creatures, which proved to be successful for ratings and a groundbreaking precedent for future shows.

In honor of the show’s milestone anniversary, »

- Alex Heigl

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David Reviews Michael Curtiz’s Mildred Pierce [Criterion Collection Blu-Ray Review]

21 February 2017 5:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

With the new release of Mildred Pierce, the Criterion Collection appears to be solidifying a trend over the past couple years of providing a showcase for some of the greatest female actors from Hollywood’s Golden Age. Since late 2014, stars like Claudette Colbert (It Happened One NightThe Palm Beach Story), Rita Hayworth (Gilda, Only Angels Have Wings) and Rosalind Russell (His Girl Friday) have made their first appearances in the Collection, in what can be considered career-defining roles. These additions seem to be addressing a notable blind spot for Criterion. As impressive as their reach has been in bringing many of the most iconic women from the past hundred years of world cinema to the forefront, the continuing absence of silver screen legends like Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Greta Garbo and Elizabeth Taylor, just to name a few, seems like a lingering oversight, a problem yet to be »

- David Blakeslee

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Rebel in the Rye’

25 January 2017 3:35 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s a myth of popular culture that J.D. Salinger hated the movies — that’d be conflating his personality with that of his most famous creation, Holden Caulfield — but it’s fair to say the reclusive author regarded the film industry with wary suspicion. Now, after Salinger spent six decades withholding the much-desired film rights to his 1951 masterwork “The Catcher in the Rye,” cinema has retaliated with karmic payback in the form of “Rebel in the Rye.” A glossily conventional biopic of Salinger’s pre-retirement years that would be unlikely to induce a change of heart in its elusive subject, Danny Strong’s film is diverting, mildly informative and — to borrow Caulfield’s adjective of choice — somewhat phony, heavy as it is on tortured-writer clichés and contrived art-imitates-life parallels. A dashing Nicholas Hoult takes a respectful stab at embodying Salinger’s mystique, but it’s hard not to feel that »

- Guy Lodge

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Cary Grant in screwball comedy His Girl Friday – video

18 January 2017 7:39 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

To mark what would have been Cary Grant’s 113th birthday, watch a scene featuring the super-smooth comedy maestro opposite Rosalind Russell in comedy classic His Girl Friday. Directed by Howard Hawks, His Girl Friday has Grant playing cynical newspaper editor Walter Burns, whose star reporter and ex-wife Hildy Johnson is about to embark on her second marriage; Walter sets out to sabotage the wedding and win Hildy back

His Girl Friday is out now on Blu-Ray

Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

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‘His Girl Friday’ Blu-ray Review

17 January 2017 2:01 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy, Gene Lockhart | Written by Charles Lederer | Directed by Howard Hawks

Walter (Cary Grant) and Hildy (Rosalind Russell) used to be married. Hildy is a journalist looking for a way out of the biz, but Walter – who also happens to be her ex-boss – wants to bring her back in. He just wants her, full stop. He sees her new fiancé – a safe dullard named Bruce (Ralph Bellamy) – and he despairs.

But Hildy and Bruce are leaving town tonight and getting married tomorrow. Walter, in typically psychopathic rom-com style, desperately contrives various ways of preventing them. Then the news story of the year is unleashed: a man accused of shooting a black police officer absconds on the eve of his execution.

A domino run of darkly farcical events begins, which not only resurrect Hildy’s passion for journalism, but also her lapsed camaraderie with Walter. »

- Rupert Harvey

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Blu-ray Review – His Girl Friday (1940)

16 January 2017 1:00 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

His Girl Friday, 1940.

Directed by Howard Hawks.

Starring Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy, John Qualen, Helen Mack, and Alma Kruger.

Synopsis:

A hard-boiled newspaper editor attempts to rekindle his ex-wife’s – and ex-star reporter’s – love for both himself and the world of newspaper journalism.

His Girl Friday marks something of a turning point in the movies. Howard Hawks’s adaptation of a play (Hold the Front Page) exploring the dynamic world of newspaper journalism took the genius idea of changing the gender of the originally male ace-reporter character and transforming him into Rosalind Russell’s vivacious Hildy Johnson. Her portrayal of a smart and determined journalist trading razor-sharp quips and put-downs with her charismatic ex-boss and ex-husband Walter Burns (Cary Grant) is a truly wonderful creation, bringing a whole new dimension to fast-talking character driven screwball comedy.

Hoping to draw Johnson back into the non-stop life of the newsroom, »

- Robert W Monk

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David Reviews Howard Hawks’ His Girl Friday [Criterion Collection Blu-Ray Review]

10 January 2017 7:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

News Flash! (Dateline: Chicago Il. January 10, 2017.) The Criterion Collection launches its 2017 campaign today with a raucous one-two punch that summons fond memories of Hollywood’s Golden Age while jabbing its finger into the chest of today’s corrupt media hacks. His Girl Friday, that epitome of classic screwball comedy, gets the deluxe treatment in a handsome dual-disc Blu-ray edition that also serves as a fancy showcase for its influential predecessor The Front Page. This winning effort by the whipsmart Criterion team spares no expense, as both flicks leap off the screen with a frenetic urgency that almost seems improper for relics of such venerable age.

But it’s not the longevity that sells this package, it’s the the relevance of how concisely the parallel stories, each with their own sharp accents of distinction, speak to today – how the brilliant cynicism of Ben Hecht’s snappy dialog simultaneously captures the »

- David Blakeslee

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His Girl Friday / The Front Page

3 January 2017 10:07 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The restoration of a newly rediscovered director’s cut of the 1931 The Front Page prompts this two-feature comedy disc — Lewis Milestone’s early talkie plus the sublime Howard Hawks remake, which plays a major gender switch on the main characters of Hecht & MacArthur’s original play.

His Girl Friday / The Front Page

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 849

Available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date January 10, 2017 / 39.96

His Girl Friday:

1940 / B&W /1:37 flat Academy / 92 min.

Starring Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy, Gene Lockhart, Porter Hall, Ernest Truex, Cliff Edwards, Clarence Kolb, Roscoe Karns, Frank Jenks, Regis Toomey, Abner Biberman, Frank Orth, John Qualen, Helen Mack, Alma Kruger, Billy Gilbert, Marion Martin.

Cinematography Joseph Walker

Film Editor Gene Havelick

Original Music Sidney Cutner, Felix Mills

Written by Charles Lederer from the play The Front Page by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur

Produced and Directed by Howard Hawks

The Front Page: »

- Glenn Erickson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 1997 | 1996 | 1994

16 items from 2017


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