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5 items from 2012


Ben Gazzara obituary

5 February 2012 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Forceful actor who built a 60-year career in the Us and Europe

Few screen debuts have equalled the searing malevolence of Ben Gazzara's Iago-inspired Jocko De Paris in The Strange One (1957). The role, which he had created on stage, became forever associated with this intense graduate of New York's method school of acting.

Gazzara, who has died aged 81 of pancreatic cancer, continued his stage career in modern classics including Epitaph for George Dillon and as the humiliated and vengeful George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? He also achieved popular acclaim through television series – notably Run for Your Life (1965-68) – and in movies for his friend John Cassavetes and other directors including Otto Preminger, Peter Bogdanovich, David Mamet, Todd Solondz and the Coen brothers.

Gazzara was born to Sicilian immigrants and grew up on Manhattan's lower east side. He began acting at the Madison Square Boys Club and »

- Brian Baxter

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Ben Gazzara obituary

4 February 2012 9:42 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Prolific actor who built a 60-year career in the Us and Europe

Few screen debuts have equalled the searing malevolence of Ben Gazzara's Iago-inspired Jocko De Paris in The Strange One (1957). The role, which he had created on stage, became forever associated with this intense graduate of New York's method school of acting.

Gazzara, who has died aged 81 of pancreatic cancer, continued his stage career in modern classics including Epitaph for George Dillon and as the humiliated and vengeful George in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1976). He also achieved popular acclaim through television series – notably Run for Your Life (1965-68) – and in movies for his friend John Cassavetes and other directors including Otto Preminger, Peter Bogdanovich, David Mamet, Todd Solondz and the Coen brothers.

Gazzara was born to Sicilian immigrants and grew up on Manhattan's lower east side. He began acting at the Madison Square Boys Club and »

- Brian Baxter

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Ben Gazzara: Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, The Strange One, They All Laughed

3 February 2012 6:40 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Audrey Hepburn, Ben Gazzara, They All Laughed Ben Gazzara Dead Pt.1: Anatomy Of A Murder, Husbands, An Early Frost Long before An Early Frost, Ben Gazzara had already appeared in two (however veiled) gay-themed productions. On Broadway, he was the virile ex-football player pining for his "best friend" while ignoring wife Barbara Bel Geddes in the 1955 original staging of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. (Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor played those two roles in the bowdlerized 1958 movie version directed by Richard Brooks.) And in 1957, Gazzara made his film debut as a sexually troubled military man who gets off by viciously abusing (or watching others viciously abuse) his fellow cadets in Jack Garfein's The Strange One. Among Gazzara's other 75 or so feature films — many of which were made in Italy — are Steve Carver's Capone (1975), in the title role; Stuart Rosenberg's Voyage of the Damned »

- Andre Soares

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Ben Gazzara Dies at 81

3 February 2012 6:15 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Ben Gazzara, who made a career of playing virile roles on stage, screen, TV and in real life, died Friday in Manhattan. He was 81. The cause was pancreatic cancer, his lawyer told The New York Times. Accomplished as an actor, dapper and irresistible to women, Gazzara came by his many streetwise roles naturally. Born Biagio Anthony Gazzara on Manhattan's Lower East Side, the child of an Italian immigrant carpenter and roofer got the acting bug starting at age 12, at the Madison Square Boys' Club. "My voice was this deep even then," he told People in 1976. The urge to perform "screwed up my schooling, »

- Stephen M. Silverman

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Jack Kerouac/The Subterraneans Movie, Pre-Kristen Stewart On The Road/Mary Lou

8 January 2012 4:16 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

On The Road Letter: Jack Kerouac Wanted Marlon Brando for Dean; Kerouac Would Play Sal [Photo: Leslie Caron.] On the Road was never made into a movie during Jack Kerouac's lifetime. However, the lesser-known The Subterraneans, which Kerouac mentions in his letter to Marlon Brando, was turned into an MGM movie in 1960. Needless to say, the final film had little in common with Kerouac's semi-autobiographical novella about an interethnic romance. In the Subterraneans movie, Kerouac's character, Leo Percepied, is played by George Peppard. The "colored" girl, Mardou Fox, minus the color but with the addition of a French accent is played by Leslie Caron. Others in the film's cast were Janice Rule, Roddy McDowall, Anne Seymour, and Jim Hutton (as the fictional Allan Ginsberg). Former screenwriter Ranald MacDougall (Mildred Pierce, Possessed, The Hasty Heart) directed from a screenplay by Robert Thom. "While none of the portrayals is distinguished," wrote A.H. Weiler in the New York Times, »

- Andre Soares

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5 items from 2012


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