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Adele Hints She May Never Tour Again: It 'Isn't Something I'm Good At'

Adele Hints She May Never Tour Again: It 'Isn't Something I'm Good At'
Agree to disagree, Adele!

The "Hello" singer could be saying "goodbye" to touring after completing her massive global trek this year, telling the crowd at her Auckland, New Zealand, performance on Sunday that "touring isn't something I'm good at."

"Applause makes me feel a bit vulnerable," she explained during the rain-soaked show, packed with 40,000 fans. "I don't know if I will ever tour again. The only reason I've toured is you. I'm not sure if touring is my bag. My greatest accomplishment in my career is this tour."

Rightfully so! When Adele's current tour wraps with four sold-out shows at Wembley Stadium in her native London this summer, she will have performed more than 120 shows spanning three continents since kicking off in February 2016.

Watch: Adele Hilariously Freaks Out Over a Mosquito While Performing 

While she's certainly earned a break, Adele also seems to have expressed interest in expanding her family. The 28-year-old
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Adele Goes Makeup-Free to Meet Elmo -- See the Pic!

Adele is flaunting her natural beauty!

The 28-year-old singer took to Instagram on Friday to share a fresh-faced photo with none other than Elmo

Related: Adele Hilariously Freaks Out Over a Mosquito While Performing in Australia: 'It Was Sucking My Blood'

"Elmo, I love you. Thanks for coming, See you in New York X," Adele captioned the pic.

Related: Adele Cancels Concert Fireworks After Her Son Angelo Is Injured by Debris

The meeting was a dream come true for Elmo, who spent the week reaching out to the singer on Twitter and TV.

"Adele! Elmo loves you with all of Elmo's heart. Elmo wants to sing 'Rolling In the Deep' with you, wherever you are. Elmo will fly there. Call Elmo! Thank you," he said on the Australian TV show The Project on Wednesday right before singing "Rolling In the Deep."

"Miss @Adele, Elmo's been wondering if after all these years you'd like to
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Film Review: ‘The C Word’

Film Review: ‘The C Word’
“It’s time to stop being afraid of cancer — it’s time for cancer to be afraid of us.” Lent a warm sense of authority by the dulcet tones of Morgan Freeman, this aphorism encapsulates the upbeat, constructive tone of Meghan Lafrance O’Hara’s documentary “The C Word,” an impassioned advocation of preventative cancer treatment that brazenly counters the methods of Big Pharma. Unapologetically subjective and plainly from the heart, the film is personally rooted in O’Hara’s own battle with the disease, though it’s another cancer warrior who emerges as its primary hero: French physician David Servan-Schreiber, whose vocal campaigning for integrative oncology divided the medical community and, according to the filmmaker, gave her a new lease on life. If “The C Word” finally plays as an extended PSA for Servan-Schreiber’s theories — with Freeman’s narration bringing a particularly advisory tone to proceedings — it’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dracula Vs. Frankenstein (1971) Blu-ray Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
Featuring a cinematic showdown between two of the horror genre's most iconic characters, Dracula vs. Frankenstein is coming to Blu-ray this holiday season from Shriek Show.

Directed by Al Adamson, Dracula vs. Frankenstein stars Lon Chaney Jr., J. Carrol Naish, Anthony Eisley, Regina Carrol, Russ Tamblyn, and Angelo Rossito. Shriek Show will release the film on Blu-ray beginning December 13th, and we have official details and a look at the cover art below.

Synopsis and Special Features (via "With a sudden slash of an axe, a woman named Joan is decapitated on a desolate beach at midnight. In a hellish laboratory hidden below the boardwalk Freak Emporium, Dr. Durea (a.k.a. Dr. Frankenstein!) drains the blood of corpses to distill an all-powerful serum. Count Dracula craves the new serum and offers the doctor the hulking body of the original Frankenstein monster in exchange. With a blast
See full article at DailyDead »

Indivisible Review [Lff 2016]

Dasy and Viola are teenage siblings who’re joined at the hip. And no, that’s not a metaphor. From Stuck on You all the way back to Todd Browning’s classic Freaks, conjoined twins have long proved fertile ground for cinema. Edoardo De Angelis’ Indivisible joins them, taking us on a subtly surreal tour of Italy’s grimy industrial south: a grimy land of burning trash and abandoned warehouses, populated by a gallery of grotesques eager to get their claws into Dasy and Viola (Angela and Marianna Fontana).

Blessed with both beauty and perfect harmony, the twins are breadwinners for their extended family – available to hire for children’s parties, weddings, baptisms and so on. Scumbag father Peppe (Massimiliano Rossi) is their Svengali, providing them with a songbook full of treacly pop songs, most of which are about the importance of unity and/or female submission.

Also on board
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997




Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script.

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue


Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue
See full article at Den of Geek »

Nxt 03.16.16 Recap & Review – Shinsuke Nakamura debuts, Bayley & Asuka vs. Eva Marie & Nia Jax, Austin Aries speaks, American Alpha vs. The Vaudevillains and more

It’s a packed edition of Nxt this week following the match-long show last week with two huge tag team matches, The Hype Bros, Emma and Tamasso Ciampa in action, the debut of Shinsuke Nakamura and an interview with A Double. It’s this week’s Nxt Recap & Review…

Show opens with highlights from the 2-out-of-3 Falls Match from last week. They did a lot of crowd sweetening to make it sound like they were more alive than they actually were.

Sami Zayn comes out to a huge reaction from the crowd. He says that he didn’t have a match last week, he had a war with a 300-pound Samoan. He reminds us all that doing so was not fun. He said the match nearly went an hour, and it could have gone either way. Due to being tapped months ago, Sami talks about his goal of being a
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

12 of cinema's biggest and most expensive film sets




We celebrate a century of huge and expensive film sets, from historical epics to sprawling fantasies and sci-fi action movies...

The advent of cinema saw the art of set design gradually spread its wings from the relative confines of the theatre. As movies established their own language and became ever more ambitious in the early part of the 20th century, so set designers were called on to create increasingly expansive and more detailed backdrops.

As the list of movies below proves, the construction of huge sets has been a  major part of cinema for the past century. And with scale comes expense, as the recreation of ancient landmarks, futuristic cities or doomed ocean liners takes hundreds of artists, designers and crafty types months of labour to plan and construct. Often, these sets are on the screen for a few scant minutes before they're torn down and largely
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Secret to Making 'Magic Mike Xxl''s Channing Tatum Strip

The Secret to Making 'Magic Mike Xxl''s Channing Tatum Strip
By her own admission, Alison Faulk has never had a problem "dancing like a dude." When she took on the assignment of staging the routines in Magic Mike Xxl, however, the 38-year-old choreographer had to dial her inner oversexed guy up to 11. "We wanted those scenes to feel daring and dirty," she says. "We wanted it to be really sexy — the sort of stuff where you you watch the actors do the moves and then ask yourself, 'Um, have we just crossed a line? Is this too much?'"

See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome’ goes beyond the franchise’s comfort zone

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome

Written by Terry Hayes and George Miller

Directed by George Miller and George Ogilvie

Australia, 1985

An undetermined amount of time has elapsed since Max’s (Mel Gibson) previous high stakes adventure. Now with a few more grey hairs, he traverses the treacherous Outback with camels and a stagecoach, looking for who knows what. His long walk is interrupted by a renegade pilot (Bruce Spence), who flies low, thus blowing up sand and obscuring Max’s field of vision. During the interruption the pilot and his son steal the wagon and make way for the only nearest outpost: Batertown. Batertown is governed by the megalomaniacal Auntie Entity (Tina Turner), although her authority is frequently challenged by a duo of characters that run the town’s fuel compound where methanol is extracted from pig feces. They are Master Blaster, or rather, Master (Angelo Rossito), a little man that
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Celebrating the Villains of the Original Mad Max Trilogy

This Friday, George Miller returns to the post-apocalyptic universe he first brought to life back in 1979 with Mad Max. His trend-setting actioner has now spawned three sequels, the latest being Mad Max: Fury Road, which has Tom Hardy bringing the seminal hero to life this time around. Since we’re just a few days away from meeting his latest adversary, the ruthless Immortan Joe, I thought this would be a perfect time to look back at the villains from the original Mad Max trilogy who first paved the way and still continue to influence film and pop culture even after three decades.

Mad Max: George Miller’s Mad Max opens with one of the most cinematically exhilarating chase sequences ever committed to celluloid (The Road Warrior coming in neck-and-neck at number two) that is fueled by the actions of a notorious criminal known as the “Nightrider,” who has escaped
See full article at DailyDead »

'Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome' (1985) Movie Review

The best way to describe Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome is to call it a misguided attempt at a dark, post-apocalyptic adaptation of Peter Pan with a side of "Lord of the Flies". If that sounds interesting that's because Thunderdome is somewhat compelling, the plotting is just all wrong. Director George Miller, this time returning to his Mad Max franchise with co-director George Ogilvie, seems intent on telling two stories at once, neither feeling as if they are of the same story. That said, once each jarring and coincidental switch in the plot is made, the result provides avenues that would be otherwise interesting to explore on their own as Miller was clearly searching for a story arc unlike the first two films when he sat down to write the screenplay with The Road Warrior co-writer Terry Hayes. Similar to the opening of its predecessor, the film begins with the titular Max (Mel Gibson) being chased,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

2015 Summer Movies Heading To Your Local Cinemas

The middle of Spring actually means a new selection of summer blockbusters to look forward to, and with a ton of big-budget films slated to come out within the next few months and beyond, the summer of 2015 looks like one to remember.

From the new Mad Max (which is already on our end-of -year top ten list event though we haven’t yet seen it) to Avengers, Poltergeists, male strippers, talking teddy bears, and a reboot of the Jurassic Park franchise, this summer’s trips to the theaters will be jam-packed with sequels and new tales. From May 1st right through to the end of August, some of the movies on our list could wind up on year-end “best of” lists or even receive some Oscar talk by December.

Grab your calendar, because Wamg has a rundown of this summer’s films we’re most excited about, so check them out below!
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Warner Bros. Pictures’ 2015 Preview Includes New Images From The Man From U.N.C.L.E. And Pan

For the second consecutive year, Warner Bros. Pictures International has exceeded the coveted $3 billion mark at the international box office. This benchmark comes on the heels of the release of The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies, a production of New Line Cinema and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures, which surpassed $400 million at the international box office this weekend and is still going strong.

Nine Warner Bros. Pictures films have exceeded $100 million internationally, topped by Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar (with Paramount Pictures), which has taken in an astounding $467 million outside of the U.S. to date, and Godzilla (with Legendary Pictures), which has earned $327 million overseas.

Four titles – Doug Liman’s Edge Of Tomorrow (with Village Roadshow Pictures), Phil Lord & Christopher Miller’s The Lego Movie (also with Village Roadshow Pictures), and Noam Murro and Zack Snyder’s 300: Rise Of An Empire (with Legendary), along with the 2014 spillover grosses from The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug
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The Noteworthy: Jlg Anthology, To Save and Project, Criterion Designs

  • MUBI
Above: continuing their series of digital anthologies, Film Comment has a new one on Jean-Luc Godard that collects everything the magazine has published on him since 1962 (!). These Goodbye to Language GIFs are just for fun: For Cinema Scope Online, Angelo Muredda takes down Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman:"While the film is ostensibly an angry manifesto stumping for artistic integrity in the face of a pablum-peddling culture industry that’s traded Raymond Carver for Stan Lee—as well as an illiterate critical class unwilling or unable to cultivate its technical competency—Birdman’s squawk is all but neutralized by its tepid bite. Though it is self-righteously mean in its broad strokes (as all polemics inevitably are), Birdman is also—this being an Iñárritu joint—an overeager, conspicuously crafted art object whose virtuosity is matched only by its digestibility. Snottily sniping at everyone but the exact sort of people who will
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George Nicholaw, Former Longtime General Manager of L.A. Radio Station Knx, Dies at 86

George Nicholaw, Former Longtime General Manager of L.A. Radio Station Knx, Dies at 86
George Nicholaw, the former general manager of Los Angeles newsradio station Knx, died at his home Saturday after being hospitalized with an infection. He was 86.

Nicholaw started his career at a radio station in Salinas, Calif.

“Nicholaw was there on day one, when Knx flipped to all-news in 1968,” said Don Barrett, editor at, which first reported news of Nicholaw’s death.

Nicholaw served as general manager of Knx from 1968-2003.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Indie Spotlight

We’re back with another edition of the Indie Spotlight, highlighting recent independent horror news sent our way. Today’s feature includes a new poster for L.A. Slasher, details on Headless, casting update on Welcome to Purgatory, trailers for Truth or Dare and Red Sleep, and more:

New Poster for L.A. Slasher: “Sales agency Circus Road Films has picked up Martin Owen’s horror/satire feature “L.A. Slasher.” Glenn Reynolds’ Circus Road is handling domestic sales. The film stars Danny Trejo (“Machete”), Mischa Barton (“The O.C.”), Dave Bautista (“Riddick”), Eric Roberts (“The Dark Knight), Drake Bell (“Drake & Josh”), Brooke Hogan (“Hogan Knows Best”), Tori Black (“Not Another Celebrity Movie”) and Marisa Lauren (“Superhero Movie”), with the of voice of Andy Dick (“News Radio”) as the ‘L.A. Slasher’.

Produced by Jeffrey Wright and Daniel Sollinger (“Girls Against Boys”), “L.A. Slasher” is a biting, social satire about reality TV and the
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Two more Daily Bugle viral articles for The Amazing Spider-Man 2

After dropping another post earlier in the week [see here], Sony's Daily Bugle viral site has now updated with another two viral articles in support of the upcoming solo sequel The Amazing Spider-Man 2 - the first of which speculates over Spidey's origin, while the second concerns the comic book villain Big Man and his Enforcers...

The Five Borough Blog

We asked our readers how they thought Spider-Man got his powers. You answered by email, text, blog, and even a brick through the window (please refrain from that in the future). Here’s what you had to say:

Lashawn F., Soho

Spider-Guy’s probably suffering from some diseases, I bet, like Arachno Syndrome, or Tarantulitis (my little brother came up with those, he’s mad funny)! He climbs walls, he shoots webs, and he eats bugs. He can never show his face cause he’s probably got fly-eyes or something. You know,
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Cartoon Network To Launch First Mini-Series, New Takes on Tom & Jerry, Bugs Bunny

Cartoon Network To Launch First Mini-Series, New Takes on Tom & Jerry, Bugs Bunny
Time Warner’s Cartoon Network unveiled an ambitious new programming slate that includes the cable outlet’s first-ever miniseries as well as revivals of classic characters such as adversarial cat-and-mouse team Tom & Jerry and rascally rabbit Bugs Bunny.

The kiddie cable network also said it planned to expand its offerings for viewers using non-traditional viewing devices, such as smartphones and tablets, to find its content. Cartoon Network said it would focus on making both original programming and digital content available to viewers as they wanted it. Later this year, Cartoon Network is expected to unveil content specifically designed for distribution on mobile devices, as well as special ads that can accompany it. The network will make move from one clip to the next by swiping their viewing screen.

The moves come as parent unit Turner decided to expand by an hour “Adult Swim,” the young-adult skewing animation block that shares Cartoon Network’s roost.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

2014 in film preview: family and musicals

The best films for kids (and fans of a sing-song) coming up in 2014, including movies starring Angelina Jolie, Steve Carell and Meryl Streep

• 2014 preview: blockbusters

• 2014 preview: thrillers

• 2014 preview: comedy

• 2014 preview: Oscar hopefuls

• 2014 preview: science fiction

• 2014 preview: romance

• 2014 preview: drama


Nega-fairy tale in which The Sleeping Beauty story is told from the point of view of Maleficent, the misunderstood fairy godmother. Angelina Jolie stars as the artist formerly known as "The Mistress of All Evil". Elle Fanning is that scheming harpy, Princess Aurora aka Sleeping Beauty. Following the recent trend for skew-wiff folk tales (Snow White and The Huntsmen, Mirror Mirror) special effects veteran Robert Stromberg makes his directorial debut with a Disney film that looks stranger and darker than the average. 28 May

Muppets Most Wanted

Jason Segel's Muppets reboot positioned Kermit and ko as comeback kings - old friends returning from the edge of showbiz to full-felted glory.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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