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Venice: France’s Indie Sales to Sell ‘The First King’ by Italy’s Matteo Rovere (Exclusive)

Venice: France’s Indie Sales to Sell ‘The First King’ by Italy’s Matteo Rovere (Exclusive)
Venice, Italy — Paris-based Indie Sales has taken sales outside Italy on “The First King” (Il Primo Re), a bold swords-and-sandals epic of sorts about the origins of Rome to be directed by Italian helmer Matteo Rovere (“Italian Race”).

Shooting is set to start Sept. 11 in Italy’s Lazio region surrounding the Eternal City on this conceptually ambitious pic, which will largely feature Latin dialogue. It’s the story of twin brothers Romulus and Remus and their creation of Rome after they were placed in a basket and left on the bank of the river Tiber as babies and subsequently fed by a she-wolf. Story features lots of battles.

Toplining the cast of “King,” which is budgeted at 7 million euros ($8.3 million) is Alessandro Borghi, who starred in Italian sleeper hit “They Call Me Jeeg,” and more recently in Netflix’s first Italian original, “Suburra,” which launched Saturday from the Lido at the Venice Film Festival. Borghi
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Joshua Reviews Eugene Green’s The Son Of Joseph [Theatrical Review]

2017 may have just begun, but it already has its first superlative motion picture release. And no, sadly, it’s not the thirty-seventh (give or take) entry in the Underworld franchise. Instead, it comes from the art film world, and specifically one of world cinema’s most interesting directors working today.

After a little over a decade of finding niche pockets of support in niche pockets of film intellectual circles, 2014 gave director Eugene Green one of his most successful outings. The superlative La Sapienza in many ways introduced the auteur to a much broader selection of cineastes, and with actor Fabrizio Rongione once again by his side Green has made yet another skeletal, beautifully crafted drama.

Entitled The Son Of Joseph, Green’s film riffs on the nativity story, telling the story of a Parisian teen by the name of Vincent (Victor Ezenfis). Living with his single mother Marie, a nurse played by Natacha Regnier,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Son Of Joseph Review

We’re introduced to the protagonist of Son of Joseph as he silently observes the tortured of a trapped rat. Two of his schoolmates jab thin steel pins at the frightened rodent. “Try to poke one of its eyes out” one urges. “I can’t, he’s too clever,” the other replies. Our hero promptly leaves, finding himself to have more in common with the rat than his supposed friends.

If you’re unfamiliar with the work of Eugène Green you have a weird road ahead of you. He’s an American-born French filmmaker with a tendency towards brain numbingly glacial pacing, intentionally monotone performances, compositions static to the point of fossilization and characters who generally end scenes by gazing blankly into the lens. His style is definitely an acquired taste, catering for those with reservoirs of patience and the ability to tolerate some pretty artsy fartsy filmmaking.

Our lonely
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Son of Joseph’ Is the First Satisfying Movie of 2017 — Review

‘Son of Joseph’ Is the First Satisfying Movie of 2017 — Review
American-born French director Eugène Green is known as a practitioner of the Baroque theater technique, in particular his ability to translate that tradition into cinematic form. If that sounds like a hard sell, you’ve never seen a Eugene Green movie.

Despite their cerebral foundations (long pauses, stilted line reading), Green’s movies are characterized by dry humor and emotion that creeps into richly conceived stories. Using classic art as his backdrop, Green reshapes it into engaging new forms. “The Portuguese Nun” was a humorous look at an attempt to adapt a 17th century novel, and his marvelous “La Sapienza” followed the relatable plight of a modern architect against the backdrop of post-Renaissance architecture. Both movies manage to transform their topics into storytelling devices with unexpected twists.

With “Son of Joseph,” Green uses a 17th century biblical painting by Carvaggio to animate the contemporary tale of an angsty teen searching
See full article at Indiewire »

The Son of Joseph review – arch family drama

The story of a teenager’s quest to find his father is marred by laboured performances

An impossibly mannered performance style, which sees characters declaim their lines flatly, and frequently straight to camera, is a bold directorial decision in the story of Vincent (Victor Ezenfis), a teenager who longs to know his father. Although reminiscent of the line delivery favoured by Yorgos Lanthimos in Dogtooth or Lobster, without the disarming humour of those films the approach just seems arch and rather grating. Biblical symbolism is employed in the chapter headings that divide the story, and in the names – Victor’s saintly single mother is Marie (Natacha Régnier), his surrogate father figure is Joseph (Fabrizio Rongione).

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Son of Joseph review – a droll teen drama with hints of Wes Anderson

Eugène Green’s The Portuguese Nun was a gentle comic gem and his new film about a lonely boy is lovable in exactly the same way

Eugène Green is an international treasure: an American-born French film-maker who, like Manoel De Oliveira, absorbs the stylised, rarefied elegance of classical theatre and brings it to movies about the present day. The Portuguese Nun (2009) was a gem of gentle comedy, and his new drama, The Son of Joseph, has the same droll innocence and lovability. With its carefully controlled, decelerated dialogue, it is weirdly moving in just the same way. Again, it has something of Rivette or Rohmer, and like Ozu (or Wes Anderson), he uses that most eccentric technique – direct sightlines into camera.

Vincent (Victor Ezenfis) is a lonely teenage boy, alienated from his peers. We first see him walking away when a couple of charmless schoolfriends start tormenting a rat in a cage.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Mathieu Amalric Leads U.S. Trailer for Eugéne Green’s ‘The Son of Joseph’

Following up his overlooked La Sapienza, director Eugène Green is back with The Son of Joseph, which after coming to Berlin, Nyff, and more, will arrive in U.S. theaters early next year. Led by Mathieu Amalric, Fabrizio Rongione (La Sapienza; Two Days, One Night), Natacha Régnier, Victor Ezenfis, and Maria de Medeiros, Kino Lorber has released the U.S. trailer for the Dardennes-produced film, which has a distinct sense of humor and energy — seemingly not to far off from Amalric’s recent film My Golden Days.

While at Berlin, Guy Lodge quite liked the film, writing for Variety, “No one behaves quite like a human being in Eugene Green’s “Le Fils de Joseph,” yet a soulful sense of humanity emerges from their heightened declamations anyway. Though it’s still steeped in its maker’s very particular formalities of language and performance, this honey-drizzled, farcically funny fable of an
See full article at The Film Stage »

Nico, Cult Singer With Velvet Underground, Set for Biopic (Exclusive)

Nico, Cult Singer With Velvet Underground, Set for Biopic (Exclusive)
Rome — Nico, the late German chanteuse who was among Andy Warhol’s muses and sang with the Velvet Underground, is getting the biopic treatment. The 1960s cult pop culture figure will be played by Denmark’s Trine Dyrholm, winner of this year’s Berlin Silver Bear for best actress.

Italian director Susanna Nicchiarelli, known on the festival circuit for her standout debut “Cosmonauta,” will start shooting Nov. 7 in Italy on the film, which is about Nico’s later years, titled “Nico, 1988.”

Besides Dyrholm, who took the Berlin statuette for her role as a wronged wife in Thomas Vinterberg’s “The Commune,” the film’s pan-European cast includes Romanian actress Anamaria Marinca (“4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 days”); Britain’s Karina Fernandez (“Happy Go Lucky”); Belgium’s Fabrizio Rongione, a regular in the Dardennes brothers’ films; France’s Sandor Funteck (“Blue Is the Warmest Color”); and promising young British stage actor Calvin Demba in his screen debut.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Finding faith by Anne-Katrin Titze

Eugène Green with Kleber Mendonça Filho's Aquarius star Sônia Braga Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, who have their film The Unknown Girl (La Fille Inconnue) screening in this year's New York Film Festival and are the co-producers for Cristian Mungiu's Graduation (Bacalaureat), also co-produced Eugène Green's Son Of Joseph (Le Fils De Joseph) starring Victor Ezenfis, Natacha Régnier, Fabrizio Rongione, Maria de Medeiros and Mathieu Amalric.

Vincent (Victor Ezenfis) Marie (Natacha Regnier) Joseph (Fabrizio Rongione): "I like Balthazar very much, but since my childhood I've always liked donkeys."

Following my conversation with Sônia Braga on her Oscar worthy performance in Kleber Mendonça Filho's Aquarius, we ran into Eugène Green whom I was meeting to discuss his film up at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. He spoke with me about Michelangelo Antonioni's Red Desert with Monica Vitti, Robert Bresson's Au Hasard Balthazar,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Film Acquisition Rundown: Samuel Goldwyn Picks Up Laff Winner ‘Green Is Gold,’ Kino Lorber Buys ‘Son of Joseph’ And More

  • Indiewire
Film Acquisition Rundown: Samuel Goldwyn Picks Up Laff Winner ‘Green Is Gold,’ Kino Lorber Buys ‘Son of Joseph’ And More
Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

– Exclusive: Samuel Goldwyn Films has picked up the North American rights to the drama “Green Is Gold,” written and directed by Ryon Baxter and starring Jimmy Baxter, Ryon Baxter and David Fine. The film recently had its world premiere at the Los Angeles Film Festival over the summer, where it won the Audience Award for Best Fiction Feature.

The film follows “a thirteen-year-old boy [who] is forced to live with his estranged brother after their father is sent to prison. Their relationship is soon tested when the older brother’s occupation as a marijuana dealer infringes on his ability not only to raise his brother, but to even take care of himself. However, through constant tribulation, they discover
See full article at Indiewire »

Menemsha boards 'The Women’s Balcony'; Kino Lorber buys 'Son Of Joseph'

  • ScreenDaily
Menemsha Films has acquired North American rights to Israeli film The Women’s Balcony, while Kino Lorber has picked up North American rights to Son Of Joseph.

The Women’s Balcony recently received its world premiere in Toronto and stars Evelyn Hagoel, Igal Naor, Orna Banai, Einat Saruf, Itzik Cohen and Aviv Alush.

Pie Films and United King produced the story about female members of an Orthodox community who rally together after the collapse of the women’s balcony in a Jerusalem synagogue.

Emil Ben Shimon directed from a screenplay by Shlomit Nehama in their feature debut.

Menemsha Films brokered the deal with Pie Films and plans a theatrical release in the first quarter of 2017.

The film will open in Israel next week as the centrepiece film release for the Jewish holidays

“We just fell in love with this film from its first screening in Toronto,” said Menemsha’s Neil Friedman. “We are confident
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Nyff 2016 Line-Up Includes ‘Manchester By the Sea,’ ‘Personal Shopper,’ ‘Paterson,’ and More

The 2016 New York Film Festival line-up has arrived, and as usual for the festival, it’s an amazing slate of films. Along with the previously announced The 13th, 20th Century Women, and The Lost City of Z, there’s two of our Sundance favorites, Manchester By the Sea and Certain Women, as well as the top films of Cannes: Elle, Paterson, Personal Shopper, Graduation, Julieta, I, Daniel Blake, Aquarius, Neruda, Sieranevada, Toni Erdmann, and Staying Vertical. As for other highlights, the latest films from Hong Sang-soo, Barry Jenkins, and Matías Piñeiro will also screen.

Check it out below, including our reviews where available.

The 13th (Opening Night, previously announced)

Directed by Ava DuVernay

USA, 2016

World Premiere

The title of Ava DuVernay’s extraordinary and galvanizing documentary refers to the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which reads “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Unknown Girl’

In Jean Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s very best films, you know exactly what you’re getting — until the quiet dramatic pivot that gently ensures you don’t. In “The Unknown Girl,” only the first half of that assessment is true, though what we get is largely exemplary: a simple but urgent objective threaded with needling observations of social imbalance, a camera that gazes with steady intent into story-bearing faces, and an especially riveting example of one in their gifted, toughly tranquil leading lady Adèle Haenel. What’s missing, however, from this stoically humane procedural tale of a guilt-racked Gp investigating a nameless passer-by’s passing, is any great sense of narrative or emotional surprise: It’s a film that skilfully makes us feel precisely what we expect to feel from moment to moment, up to and including the long-forestalled waterworks. Though it will receive the broad distribution practically guaranteed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Selects acquires Cannes duo

  • ScreenDaily
The distributor has picked up Us rights to newly announced Cannes selections Graduation and The Unknown Girl.

Cristian Mungiu’s Graduation (aka Bacalaureat) is a family drama that takes place in small Romanian town where everybody knows everybody.

Adrian Titieni, Maria Dragus and Lia Bugnar star. Mungiu’s Mobra Films produced with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne of Films du Fleuve; Pascal Caucheteux and Grégoire Sorlat of Why Not Productions; Vincent Maraval of Wild Bunch; and Jean Labadie of Le Pacte. Tudor Reu is executive producer.

Sundance Selects negotiated with Wild Bunch for The Unknown Girl – also known as The Son Of Joseph (La Fille Unconnue) – from Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne.

Adele Haenel, Jeremie Renier, Olivier Gourmet, Fabrizio Rongione and Thomas Doret star in the story about a young doctor who investigates the identity of a mysterious dead body. Denis Freyd and the Dardennes produced.

The buys bring to four the number of Cannes competition selections in the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes: Sundance Selects Buys U.S. Rights to ‘Graduation,’ ‘Unknown Girl’

Sundance Selects has acquired U.S. rights from Wild Bunch to a pair of films in competition at the Cannes Film Festival — Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation” and Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s “The Unknown Girl.”

Sundance Selects made the announcement Thursday, shortly after the Cannes official selection lineup was unveiled.

The distributor noted that it had already acquired U.S. rights to another Cannes competition title with Nicole Garcia’s “From the Land of the Moon” while its sister company IFC Films has Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper” in competition.

“Graduation,” directed and written by Mungiu, stars Adrian Titieni, Maria Dragus and Lia Bugnar. The film was produced by Mungiu’s Mobra Films; Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne of Films du Fleuve; Pascal Caucheteux and Grégoire Sorlat of Why Not Productions; Vincent Maraval of Wild Bunch; and Jean Labadie of Le Pacte.

The film is a family drama that centers on themes
See full article at Variety - Film News »

First Trailer For Eugéne Green’s ‘Le fils de Joseph’ With Mathieu Amalric, Fabrizio Rongione & More

It was only a few days ago when we shared the first images from Le Fils de Joseph, the latest drama Eugène Green, his follow-up to La Sapienza, which was sadly overlooked last year — at least in the United States. Led by Mathieu Amalric, Fabrizio Rongione (La Sapienza; Two Days, One Night), Natacha Régnier, Victor Ezenfis, and Maria de Medeiros, we now have the first trailer for the drama. While it is without any subtitles yet, that isn’t a problem when it comes to witnessing more vibrant cinematography from the director.

While at Berlin, Guy Lodge quite liked the film, writing for Variety, “No one behaves quite like a human being in Eugene Green’s “Le Fils de Joseph,” yet a soulful sense of humanity emerges from their heightened declamations anyway. Though it’s still steeped in its maker’s very particular formalities of language and performance, this honey-drizzled,
See full article at The Film Stage »

First Looks at New Films from Studio Ghibli, Eugéne Green, and More

There are few better ways to predict the Cannes lineup than looking up whatever Wild Bunch are soon putting out. The French production outfit earns as much attention as anyone around mid-May, and there are at least two in-development titles that have caught our attention — though you wouldn’t necessarily expect that they have the same people working behind the scenes.

They are The Red Turtle, a co-production with Studio Ghibli directed by Michaël Dudok de Wit, and Blood Father, a thriller directed by Jean-François Richet that stars Mel Gibson, William H. Macy, Diego Luna, Michael Parks, and Erin Moriarty (The Kings of Summer, Jessica Jones), among others. Then there’s Le Fils de Joseph, from Eugène Green — whose La Sapienza was one of my ten favorite movies from last year — and starring Mathieu Amalric, Fabrizio Rongione (La Sapienza; Two Days, One Night), Natacha Régnier, Victor Ezenfis, and Maria de Medeiros
See full article at The Film Stage »

Daily | Berlinale 2016 Diary #5

In today's Berlinale Diary entry, I offer first impressions of Eugène Green's Le Fils de Joseph with Victor Ezenfis, Natacha Régnier, Fabrizio Rongione, Mathieu Amalric and Maria de Medeiros; Wang Bing's Ta'ang, a documentary on refugees crossing the border from Myanmar into China; Yang Chao's years-in-the-making Crosscurrent with Qin Hao, Xin Zhi Lei, Wu Lipeng, Wang Hongwei and Jiang Hualin; and Rafi Pitts's Soy Nero with Johnny Ortiz, Rory Cochrane, Aml Ameen, Darrell Britt-Gibson and Michael Harney. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Le Fils de Joseph’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Le Fils de Joseph’
No one behaves quite like a human being in Eugene Green’s “Le Fils de Joseph,” yet a soulful sense of humanity emerges from their heightened declamations anyway. Though it’s still steeped in its maker’s very particular formalities of language and performance, this honey-drizzled, farcically funny fable of an unhappy teenager seeking a father — first the one he has, then the one he deserves — could prove to be Green’s most commercially accessible work, even among arthouse auds not necessarily attuned to its millefeuille layering of theological symbolism. (Its mirthful contemporary remix of the Nativity story, however, surely can’t escape anyone’s notice.) Green makes films for anyone willing to enter his peculiar universe of expressive purity and (mostly) suspended cynicism, to which “Joseph” reps one of his most beguiling invitations.

This is Green’s first team-up with producers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, whose increasingly catholic arthouse
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2016: #1. Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne’s La Fille inconnue

La Fille inconnue

Directors: Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

Writers: Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

The two-time Palme d’Or winning Belgian duo Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (Rosetta; L’Enfant) take our top spot for most anticipated foreign film of 2016. Like their last two features, the directors have cast a well-known actress, Adèle Haenel (recently winning her second Cesar for Love at First Fight) for their latest feature, La Fille inconnue (The Unknown Girl) (Cecile de France centered 2011’s Kid with a Bike while Marion Cotillard mastered 2014’s Two Days, One Night). Haenel stars as a young general practitioner who feels severe guilt about not providing surgery for a young woman who is found dead a short while after. Confirming the girl’s identity is a mystery, the Gp is determined to find out what happened and who she is.

Cast: Adèle Haenel, Jeremie Renier, Thomas Doret, Olivier Gourmet, Fabrizio Rongione, Christelle Cornil

Production Co.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »
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