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‘The Ornithologist’s Beautifully Blasphemous Art References

By Jacob Oller

Heavenly reflections of some great paintings. loose retelling of the life of Saint Anthony of Padua, The Ornithologist is not afraid to muck around in God’s territory. Well not just that, but also in the realm of other media. Director João Pedro Rodrigues made a film purposefully transgressive, but no lesser pretty for the effort. […]

The article ‘The Ornithologist’s Beautifully Blasphemous Art References appeared first on Film School Rejects.
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‘Hogar,’ ‘Tiburones,’ ‘Death Will Come and Will Have Your Eyes’ at Montevideo’s Puentes

Maura Delpero’s “Hogar,” Lucía Garibaldi’s “Tiburones” and José Luis Torres Leiva’s “Death Will Come and Will Have Your Eyes” will be honed at the second 2017 Puentes meet, the most prominent of Europe-Latin American co-production workshops.

Co-organized by Uruguay’s Mutante Cine production outfit, the event unspools in Montevideo over Nov. 23-27, prior to the 9th Ventana Sur, Latin America’s biggest movie market. Thanks to a special collaboration agreement, Puentes participant-producers can attend Ventana Sur (Nov. 27 – Dec. 1), in Buenos Aires. This is the fifth year that Montevideo hosts the Puentes event.

Founded in 2009 by Eave (European Audiovisual Entrepreneurs), Puentes is a training workshop for Europe and LatAm producers, which took place for the first time in Uruguay in 2012.

An Arte Award winner at San Sebastian’s 5th Europe-Latin America Co-Production Forum last year, Maura Delpero’s “Hogar” is produced by Italian Alessandro Amato’s Dispàrte in co-production with Argentinean Campo Cine. The first fiction
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Where to Stream the Best Films of 2017

As 2017 winds down, like most cinephiles, we’re looking to get our hands on the titles that may have slipped under the radar or simply gone unseen. With the proliferation of streaming options, it’s thankfully easier than ever to play catch-up, and to assist with the process, we’re bringing you a rundown of the best titles of the year available to watch.

Curated from the Best Films of 2017 So Far list we published for the first half of the year, it also includes films we’ve enjoyed the past few months and some we’ve recently caught up on. This is far from a be-all, end-all year-end feature (that will come at the end of the year), but rather something that will hopefully be a helpful tool for readers to have a chance to seek out notable, perhaps underseen, titles from the year.

Note that we’re going by U.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Mexico’s Fénix Ibero-American Film Awards Honor TV Series for First Time

Mexico’s Fénix Ibero-American Film Awards Honor TV Series for First Time
In a nod to the exponential growth of quality TV series, Mexico’s Fenix Ibero-American Film Awards have included television content among the nominees this year. The selection is determined by Cinema23 which is comprised of 700 film professionals from Latin America, Spain and Portugal.

Nominees for the 4th Fenix Awards include 20 feature films, nine documentaries and 13 TV series, Cinema23 announced. Winners will be unveiled at the Teatro de la Ciudad Esperanza, Mexico City on December 6, 2017. The glittering event will be broadcast live across the Americas, except Canada, via E! Entertainment Television, Studio Universal, Canal 52Mx and Cinelatino.

The nominations were pre-selected out of a pool of 800 projects by a committee comprised of critics, programmers, festival directors and film academics. In a second phase, Cinema23 members specializing in a particular field, be they actors, directors, editors or cinematographers, voted on their choices for their specific category.

Netflix has at least three original series in contention: “Narcos,” “3%” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Ornithologist review – from the sacred to the profane

Two Chinese girls rescue a drowning bird-watcher in this playful, increasingly surreal film

A playful, queer riff on the last chapter in the life of St Anthony of Padua, the patron saint for the recovery of lost items, The Ornithologist follows a beautiful, pouty bird-watcher named Fernando (Paul Hamy) as he observes the wildlife populating the misty woods and winding rivers of north-east Portugal. Things quickly take a turn for the bizarre when his kayak snaps and his waterlogged body is rescued by two Chinese girls (self-styled “good Christian girls”), who wrap him in foil, revive him with some “ancient tea” and, er, tie him up. Director João Pedro Rodrigues seems more interested in how to get from one bit of story to another than overall narrative clarity, but the steel-stomached will find there’s fun to be had with the film’s investment in the spectacle of bodies (variously
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘Dawson City: Frozen Time,’ ‘Marjorie Prime,’ ‘Lady Macbeth,’ ‘Landline,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Abundant Acreage Available (Angus MacLachlan)

Faith-based cinema is as diverse a genre as there is, from the extreme, often violent portraits of devotion from established directors like Martin Scorsese and Mel Gibson, to the attacks on logic in the God’s Not Dead and Left Behind pictures. Angus MacLachlan, a great storyteller of the not-too-deep south, offers a nuanced example of what this genre can bring, returning with the moving Abundant Acreage Available.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Ornithologist review – beautiful, erotic and baffling meditation on faith

This seductive and playful retelling of the life of St Anthony of Padua, set in a jungle in northern Portugal, recalls the work of Apichatpong Weerasethakul

At certain moments in this dreamily erotic, playfully baffling and beautifully shot movie, I found myself thinking of the naked Pan shepherd at the beginning of Powell and Pressburger’s A Matter of Life and Death. There is the same elusive sense of humour. The Ornithologist is highly diverting and seductive, a pastoral of sorts, and a secular meditation on faith and acceptance, very loosely derived from the life of St Anthony of Padua. However, it retreats into a kind of shaggy-dog whimsy by the end, and doesn’t entirely live up to its visionary promise.

A bird-watcher called Fernando (Paul Hamy) is looking for black storks in remote northern Portugal. Transfixed by the sight of them through his binoculars while kayaking, he incautiously
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tiff 2017. Correspondences #11

  • MUBI
Caro Danny,I share your admiration for First Reformed, certainly one of the best films I’ve seen at this year’s Tiff and Paul Schrader’s most concentrated work in ages. From the very first shot—an adagio dolly-in on a severely framed chapel—we’re in familiar territory for the veteran filmmaker, yet in the presence of a fierce new lucidity. “Even a pastor needs pastoring,” someone tells the ecclesiastical protagonist (Ethan Hawke, harrowed like one of Beckett’s aged photographs), but his midnight-of-the-soul juncture is something he must sort through alone. Contemplating the paltry church attendance from the pulpit, grimacing at other people’s earthy jokes, and growing agitated at the planet’s ecological ruination, he struggles with a cancerous body and a nauseous soul. Still, the feeling is not one of hopelessness, due to the priest’s stirrings of resolve and desire and also to Schrader’s stylistic vehemence,
See full article at MUBI »

Venice Review: ‘Zama’ is an Elusive, Visually Wondrous Return for Lucrecia Martel

You don’t make La Ciénaga, The Holy Girl, and The Headless Woman in a row without winning accolades and a passionate following the world over. As such, the anticipation level for Argentinian director Lucrecia Martel’s fourth feature and first in nearly a decade is understandably high. When Zama was denied a Cannes slot back in May, people assumed it was a blameless case of conflict of interest, as competition jury president Pedro Almodóvar is also a producer of the film. When the Venice Film Festival subsequently selected the long-awaited picture but put it in the less prestigious out-of-competition section, however, eyebrows were raised with palpable outrage – especially considering the fact that among the 21-title strong competition line-up, only one film comes from a female filmmaker.

Well, now that we’ve seen it, the festival programmers’ reservations seem easier to understand.

A synopsis of the film reads: Based on
See full article at The Film Stage »

Strand Releasing acquires drama 'The Cakemaker'

The film had its world premiere at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

Strand Releasing has acquired all North American rights to Israeli filmmaker Ofir Raul Graizer’s The Cakemaker from Films Boutique.

Jon Gerrans and Marcus Hu of Strand Releasing and Jean-Christophe Simon and Valeska Neu of Films Boutique negotiated the deal at this year’s German Films Previews at Karlovy Vary.

The Cakemaker centres on a German baker, Thomas, who falls in love with an Israeli businessman. When the businessman dies in an accident, Thomas travels from Germany to Israel to connect with the man’s wife and a bond is formed.

The film has also been acquired in Japan (Shin Nippon), Spain (Karma), Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay (Mirada) and Hungary (Cirko Films).

The Cakemaker is an Israeli-German co-production, produced by Itai Kamir from Laila Films and Mathias Schwerbrock at Film Base Berlin.

“We’re thrilled to have this amazing film and hope that
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The 17 Best Indie Movies of 2017 (So Far)

  • Indiewire
The 17 Best Indie Movies of 2017 (So Far)
Yes, we know: It’s a little premature to assemble a list of the best movies of the year when there’s so much left of it. We have yet to see a lot of exciting new work from major auteurs like Christopher Nolan (“Dunkirk”), Alexander Payne (“Downsizing”), and Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”), not to mention heavy-hitting studio-produced spectacles like “Blade Runner 2049” and “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” But those last two wouldn’t even qualify for this list of the best independent films of the year, anyway, and they’ll have plenty of time to hog the spotlight.

Fortunately, we’ve found plenty of movies from around the world to celebrate, and while they haven’t all been box office sensations, they provide overwhelming evidence that the art form is thriving well into the second decade of the new millennium, and shows no signs of slowing down.
See full article at Indiewire »

“I Don’t Want to Find a Method… I Like Questoning What I Make”: João Pedro Rodrigues on The Ornithologist

This interview with João Pedro Rodrigues was originally conducted in 2016 when his new feature, The Ornithologist, premiered at the Locarno Film Festival. We’re reposting today on the occasion of the film’s U.S. release via Strand Releasing. The Ornithologist opens today in New York at the IFC Center and the Elinor Bunin Monroe Film Center. The last few years have been truly a whirlwind period for Portuguese director João Pedro Rodrigues, with career retrospectives in the Us and Japan, filmmaker residencies at France’s prestigious Le Fresnoy and at the Harvard Film Archive, and even a competition slot at Locarno for […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

A Beguiling Journey Begins in U.S. Trailer for ‘The Ornithologist’

João Pedro Rodrigues won the Best Director award at the 2016 Locarno Film Festival for The Ornithologist, a surreal drama (and one of our favorites of the festival) following Fernando (Paul Hamy), a solitary ornithologist searching for an endangered black stork along a remote river in Portugal. Fernando is swept away in the river, only to be rescued by two girls. Afterwards, Fernando travels further into the wilderness in a journey that mimics the life of Saint Anthony of Padua.

“How do you portray a Saint as a transcendental being?,” the director told us at Locarno. “But portraying a man or a woman. So you have to give him or her features. There’s the model. Many painters painted models as the Virgin Mary or what. But they’re all mythical figures and you don’t know if they existed or not. But I like his idea of, “How do you embody transcendency?
See full article at The Film Stage »

From João

João Nicolau's John From (2015), which is receiving an exclusive global online premiere on Mubi, is showing from May 12 - June 11, 2017 as a Special Discovery.João Nicolau has become one of the main voices of contemporary Portuguese cinema, next to the likes of Miguel Gomes or João Pedro Rodrigues. John From, his second feature, is a dreamy coming of age tale of both epic and intimate proportions, just like first love. By way of an irresistibly warm 16mm cinematography, a candidly charming protagonist, and the exuberance of Melanesia, Nicolau delivers a truly original, enchanting ode to adolescence and fantasy.Notebook: Is this a film about love, about fantasy, or about love being a fantasy?JOÃO Nicolau: Cinema and passion have two things in common. One is that they make you see things. The other is that they make those things become real. Within this frame, fantasy is just one layer of reality.
See full article at MUBI »

San Francisco Presents Cinema as a Catalyst for Bridging Cultures

A preview of this year’s San Francisco International Film Festival.The Cinema Travellers

With nationalism on the rise there is a palpable hunger for art than connects nations and peoples. No art form bridges cultural divides like film. The programmers at the San Francisco International Film Festival (rechristened “Sffilm”) have always taken on this mission with enthusiasm and a keen eye for quality. Sffilm celebrates its 60th birthday this year and is the longest running film festival in the Americas. It is precisely this year’s slate of foreign films that poignantly illustrate the capacity of cinema to speak universally.

A perfect example is the extraordinary The Cinema Travelers — Shirley Abraham and Amit Madheshiya’s indescribable real-life ride-along with the travelling tent theaters of India, alive but struggling in the most remote of remote corners of that huge country for more than 70 years.

In focusing on two tent cinema operators and their milieu, on
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Istanbul unveils line-up amid charged atmosphere, Ian McKellen to attend

Istanbul unveils line-up amid charged atmosphere, Ian McKellen to attend
Istanbul Film Festival unveils line-up and Meetings On The Bridge details.

The İstanbul Film Festival (April 5-15) has unveiled the programme for its 36th edition.

Scroll down for lineups

Despite intensive political campaigning ahead of the Turkish constitutional referendum on April 16 and an ongoing state of emergency in the country following last year’s July putsch, festival director Kerem Ayan revealed the line-up at a relatively relaxed press conference in Istanbul.

The festival will host a total of 203 films in 21 categories from 61 countries in nine venues on both sides of the Bosphorous. Among those are 13 Turkish features getting their world premieres.

Among films to compete in the international competition are Toronto hit Lady Macbeth and French immigration drama This is Our Land.

While the number of international guests set to attend the festival is expected to be down on previous years due to a series of terror attacks in the city, notable guests
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Istanbul unveils lineup amid charged atmosphere, Ian McKellen to attend

Istanbul unveils lineup amid charged atmosphere, Ian McKellen to attend
Istanbul Film Festival unveils line-up and Meetings On The Bridge details.

The İstanbul Film Festival (April 5-15) has unveiled the programme for its 36th edition.

Scroll down for lineups

Despite intensive political campaigning ahead of the Turkish constitutional referendum on April 16 and an ongoing state of emergency in the country following last year’s July putsch, festival director Kerem Ayan revealed the line-up at a relatively relaxed press conference in Istanbul.

The festival will host a total of 203 films in 21 categories from 61 countries in nine venues on both sides of the Bosphorous. Among those are 13 Turkish features getting their world premieres.

Among films to compete in the international competition are Toronto hit Lady Macbeth and French immigration drama This is Our Land.

While the number of international guests set to attend the festival is expected to be down on previous years due to a series of terror attacks in the city, notable guests
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film News: 20th Chicago European Union Film Festival Opens at Gene Siskel Center on Mar. 3, 2017

Chicago – From March 3rd to the 30th, the 20th Chicago European Union Film Festival (Ceuff) of 2017 will unfurl at the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago. The Opening Night Film is from Malta – and their emerging film industry – and it’s entitled “20,000 Reasons,” directed by Jameson Cucciardi. For more information, including a complete schedule of films, click here.

This is the largest festival in the nation showcasing films of the European Union nations, and this edition of Ceuff presents Chicago premieres of 62 new feature films, representing all 28 European Union nations. Included in the festival are new and daring work by some of Europe’s most renowned directors, including: Olivier Assayas (“Personal Shopper”); the Dardennes brothers (“The Unknown Girl”); Doris Dörrie (“Greetings from Fukushima”); Bruno Dumont (“Slack Bay”); Eugène Green (“The Son of Joseph”); Szabolcs Hajdu (“It’s Not the Time of My Life”); Joachim Lafosse (“After Love”); Sergei Loznitsa (“Austerlitz
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 16

  • MUBI
Above: Mondo poster for The Graduate (Mike Nichols, USA, 1967); artist: Rory Kurtz; lettering: Jay Shaw.On my daily movie poster Tumblr I don’t make a habit of posting fan art or art prints—call them what you will—because I’m most interested in the intersection of commerce and art that is the theatrical movie poster. But I make an exception when something stands out, and nothing stood out last year quite like Rory Kurtz’s beautiful, elegant and unexpected Mondo illustration for The Graduate, which quite rightly racked up over 200 more likes than even its nearest competitor. But its nearest competitor was fan art too: a brilliant poster for Badlands by the insanely talented Adam Juresko, whose art poster for In the Mood for Love (featured in my Maggie Cheung article) was also in the top four. What makes art posters easy to like—beyond their extraordinary artistry
See full article at MUBI »

‘Tunnel,’ ‘Distinguished Citizen,’ ‘4th Company’ Compete for Palm Springs’ Cine Latino Award

‘Tunnel,’ ‘Distinguished Citizen,’ ‘4th Company’ Compete for Palm Springs’ Cine Latino Award
“At the End of the Tunnel,” “The Distinguished Citizen” and “The 4th Company” figure among 26 features from Latin America, Spain and Portugal competing for the Palm Springs Festival’s 2017 Cine Latino Award.

Also boasting “Everybody Loves Somebody,” from Mexico’s Catalina Aguilar Mastretta, a Palm Springs world premiere, the Festival’s lineup of movies from the region has consolidated as a telling testimony to the major highlights and trends in Latin American cinema over the last year while also anticipating titles which could have a major impact on awards, sales or other festival play in the year to come. Few Ibero-American festival lineups are as inclusive, or sensitive to new talent. some not even fully recognised as yet in Latin America itself.

Directed by Rodrigo Grande, and produced by Spain’s Tornasol Films and Argentina’s Haddock and Telefe, the Academy Award winning producers of “The Secret of Their Eyes,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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