Jean Rochefort - News Poster

News

9th Lumière Festival Launches With Frémaux, Tavernier, Mann, Mitchell, Del Toro, Cuaron, Swinton, Lambert, Brühl

9th Lumière Festival Launches With Frémaux, Tavernier, Mann, Mitchell, Del Toro, Cuaron, Swinton, Lambert, Brühl
Lyon, France — The 9th Lumière Festival opened in Lyon on Saturday with a glitzy and star-studded yet intimate and informal ceremony at the cavernous Halle Tony Garnier, the city’s famed concert hall.

Thierry Frémaux and Bertrand Tavernier, the respective director and president of the Institut Lumière, paid tribute to stars and filmmakers past and present, including a slew of high-profile guests that included Tilda Swinton, who was greeted with an emotional ovation, Michael Mann, Christopher Lambert and Daniel Brühl. Also in attendance were Mexican filmmakers Guillermo Del Toro and Alfonso Cuarón, who the laid-back Fremaux greeted in Spanish with “Hola cabrones!” – a more affectionate salutation than it might seem – and a mariachi band serenade.

It was, however, French actor and rock ‘n’ roll icon Eddy Mitchell, who dazzled the crowd with his entrance. Although he didn’t play live, “Pas de boogie woogie,” his 1976 hit cover of the Jerry Lee Lewis classic, blared as the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jean Rochefort - living life at the gallop by Richard Mowe - 2017-10-10 16:16:37

In typical dandy-esque pose: Jean Rochefort who, besides acting, harboured a life-long passion for equestrian pursuits. Photo: Unifrance Veteran French actor Jean Rochefort who only two years ago with his last screen appearance in Floride by Philippe Le Guay, received an honorary César (French Oscar), has died in Paris at the age of 87.

In Floride, he played an octogenarian former industrialist who is suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease. In one interview about the film in which she shared the bill with Sandrine Kiberlain, he declared that he could sense his own demise on the horizon. “There are moments when I would be happy for it to happen … the body asks for it and some times the head as well. But I don’t want to cause sorrow to others,” he was quoted as saying.

In another quote on the subject he opined: “I don’t want to snuff it right
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Jean Rochefort obituary

French actor who made his name in sex farces of the 1970s and missed out on a starring role in Terry’s Gilliam’s Don Quixote film

With his lean, tall figure, his sunken, weary features, doleful eyes, moustache and prominent nose, the French actor Jean Rochefort, who has died aged 87, seemed born to play Don Quixote. Terry Gilliam thought the same when in 1998 he cast Rochefort as the idealistic and impractical Don in The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, which was also to have featured Johnny Depp and Vanessa Paradis in leading roles.

Everything was set up when Rochefort fell ill with prostate problems that meant he could not sit on a horse. Shooting was abandoned after a few days because Gilliam would not replace Rochefort. Despite many attempts to restart the project (which themselves became the subject of the 2002 documentary Lost in La Mancha), with different actors as
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Lost in La Mancha's Jean Rochefort, veteran French actor, dies at 87

Rochefort, who scored a major international success in The Hairdresser’s Husband, was also cast as Don Quixote in Terry Gilliam’s ill-fated Cervantes adaptation

Related: After 17 years, has Terry Gilliam finally broken the curse of Don Quixote?

Jean Rochefort, the French actor who played a key role in one of the most ill-fated movie sagas in Hollywood history, has died aged 87, his daughter said on Monday.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

French Actor Jean Rochefort Dies at 87

  • PEOPLE.com
French Actor Jean Rochefort Dies at 87
Perhaps forever to be known as “The Best Don Quixote Who Never Was,” French actor Jean Rochefort has died at age 87, according to Afp.

Rochefort was hospitalized in August and died overnight on Sunday, Afp reported, according to Deadline.

One of the most loved, iconoclastic figures of French cinema in the last 70 years, Rochefort first began appearing in films in 1955.

Both a romantic leading man and character actor, Rochefort was a three time César honoree equally skilled in dramatic and comedic roles. He starred in a number of successful, critically praised French films which attracted international audiences including Ridicule and The Hairdresser’s Husband.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Jean Rochefort Dies: French Actor Was Famously to Appear in ‘Don Quixote’

Jean Rochefort Dies: French Actor Was Famously to Appear in ‘Don Quixote’
French actor Jean Rochefort, who rose to prominence in the 1960s and was equally adept at arthouse dramas and crowdpleasing comedies, appearing in “The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe” and “Pardon Mon Affaire” as well as Patrice Leconte’s “The Hairdresser’s Husband” and “Ridicule,” has died. He was 87.

Rochefort died in a Paris hospital on Sunday night. The actor’s death was confirmed by his daughter Clemence, one of his five children.

Rochefort last starred opposite Sandrine Kiberlain in Philippe Le Guay’s “Florida,” which world-premiered at Locarno in 2015 and was nominated for Variety Piazza Grande Award.

His potential English-language breakthrough, as the Don Quixote character in Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” was famously abandoned during production. The struggles to get this feature off the ground were later memorably chronicled in the documentary “Lost in La Mancha.”

A pillar of French cinema, Rochefort made his leap into the limelight in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jean Rochefort Dies: Mustachioed Icon Of French Cinema Was 87

  • Deadline
Jean Rochefort Dies: Mustachioed Icon Of French Cinema Was 87
An icon of elegance and comedy with an instantly recognizable mustache, veteran French actor Jean Rochefort has died. The prolific talent and three-time César Award winner was hospitalized in August and passed away overnight Sunday, his family told Afp. He was 87. Rochefort had nearly 150 films under his belt, including 1972 Cannes entry Hearth Fires opposite Annie Girardot, and that same year’s Le Grand Blond Avec Une Chaussure Noire (The Tall Blond Man With One Black Sh…
See full article at Deadline »

The Old Dark House (1932) 4K Restoration Home Media Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
He played iconic roles like Frankenstein's monster and Imhotep (aka The Mummy), but Boris Karloff also instilled life in so many other intriguing characters, including Morgan in The Old Dark House, coming to Blu-ray (in a 4K restoration), DVD, and digital platforms this October from the Cohen Film Collection:

Press Release: Charles S. Cohen, Chairman and CEO of Cohen Media Group, today announced that the landmark thriller The Old Dark House, starring Boris Karloff, will be released by the Cohen Film Collection on Blu-ray, DVD and digital platforms on October 24, 2017. The home video release features the dazzling new 4K digital restoration that was screened to wide acclaim at the 2017 Venice Film Festival.

Based on J.B. Priestley's popular novel Benighted, this legendary classic was directed by James Whale in the fertile period between his Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein. In The Old Dark House, Whale puts a surprising spin on
See full article at DailyDead »

The 25 Best French Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amélie’ to ‘Cache’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best French Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amélie’ to ‘Cache’
Cinema was one of the truly international phenomenons of the last millennium, but France — more so than any other nation — has always been one of the medium’s most essential guiding lights. From the pioneer era of the Lumiere brothers, to the revolutionary New Wave that expanded our understanding of film’s potential, to the country’s recent defense of the theatrical experience, France has always pushed the movies forward while reminding us what we love about them in the first place. No country did more to help propel cinema into the 20th Century, and no country has done more to help sustain its integrity and its potential in the 21st.

From sultry thrillers to mind-blowing 3D experiments and one of the most heartbreakingly honest love stories ever told, these are the 25 best French films of the 21st Century.

Note: To qualify for our list, a film had to be
See full article at Indiewire »

Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’: 6 Pivotal Moments in the ‘Cursed’ Passion Project

  • Indiewire
Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’: 6 Pivotal Moments in the ‘Cursed’ Passion Project
After 17 years, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has finally turned the corner from cursed film project to completed movie, a historic and improbable milestone that has many people asking, “Is it really true?” One of the most troubled productions in the history of cinema, the project has been tormenting Gilliam for more than 25 years, since he first started tinkering with a screenplay adaptation in 1991.

Read More: Cannes 2016: Terry Gilliam on ‘Continual Failure’ and ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Despite several false starts over the years, Gilliam never bought into the idea that the project was doomed. “The curse is bullshit,” he said during an interview with IndieWire at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016, a year that also marked the 400th anniversary of the death of “Don Quixote” writer Miguel de Cervantes.

Starring Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce, Stellan Skarsgard and Olga Kurylenko, the film tells
See full article at Indiewire »

Terry Gilliam Wraps On The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

  • TheMovieBit
Way, way back in 1998, Brazil and Twelve Monkeys director Terry Gilliam embarked on making The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a very Gilliam-esque take on Miguel de Cervantes’ 16th century novel Don Quixote. With the original novel concerning an insane Spanish nobleman thinking himself to be a knight bringing back chivalry and justice to the world, Gilliam’s vision saw Johnny Depp as a 21st century marketing executive thrown back in time, and being mistaken for Quixote’s sire, Sancho Panza. Production began in September of 2000, quickly becoming one of the most disastrous shoots of all time. As chronicled in the documentary Lost in La Mancha, weather problems, nervous investors, and even the Spanish military added to the movie’s production woes. The final nail in the coffin came when Dox Quixote himself, Jean Rochefort, was diagnosed with a double herniated disc after attempting to act while riding a horse,
See full article at TheMovieBit »

Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After Nearly 2 Decades

  • The Wrap
Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After Nearly 2 Decades
Terry Gilliam is tilting at windmills no more. Last week, the director wrapped production on “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a fantasy-adventure that the writer-director memorably had to scuttle mid-shoot back in 2000. The ironically quixotic project — which then starred Johnny Depp, Jean Rochefort and Vanessa Paradis — fell apart and became the subject of a 2002 documentary, “Lost in La Mancha.” That film chronicled how flooding in Navarre destroyed the sets, Rochefort fell ill and left the project mid-shoot, producers struggled to secure insurance and financing to keep the project afloat. But producers announced Monday that Gilliam had...
See full article at The Wrap »

17 Years Later… Terry Gilliam Wraps ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

17 Years Later… Terry Gilliam Wraps ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’
After 17 years of pre-production, principal photography has finally wrapped on Terry Gilliam’s embattled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. Gilliam has been working on the project since 1989 and originally began shooting the film back in 2000 when Johnny Depp was involved. That ill-fated go was memorably captured in the feature documentary Lost In La Mancha, which cataloged the series of catastrophes that hit the production, including leading man Jean Rochefort having a…
See full article at Deadline »

Don Quixote: Terry Gilliam confirms filming is finally finished

Simon Brew Jun 5, 2017

Nearly 17 years after he first started making the film, Terry Gilliam has wrapped production on The Man Who Killed Don Quixote...

It would be correct to say it’s been a bit of a journey for Terry Gilliam, this one. He first started trying to make his film of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote in earnest back in 2000, when production was abandoned following the illness of actor Jean Rochefort. This particular lost take on the project was documented in the excellent film, Lost In La Mancha. To this day, that remains one of the best documentaries about making a film that you'll ever see.

See related Star Wars: Rogue One review Star Wars: Rogue One - what did you think?

Since then, Gilliam has tried on numerous occasions to resurrect the project, but to little avail. Well, until this year. Filming began once again
See full article at Den of Geek »

Terry Gilliam wraps production on The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Well, here’s some news you probably never thought you’d read: Terry Gilliam has taken to Facebook to announce that he’s wrapped production on his long-gestating passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote!

Gilliam has spent the best part of two decades trying to get his adaptation of Miguel de Cervantes’ classic novel off the ground. He came close in 2000 with a cast that included Jean Rochefort as Don Quixote and Johnny Depp as his lead character Toby, only for the production to encounter numerous difficulties before it was eventually abandoned (and documented in the 2002 film Lost in La Mancha).

This take on the project stars Jonathan Pryce (Game of Thrones) as Quixote and Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Force Awakens) as Toby, while the rest of the cast includes Olga Kurylenko (Quantum of Solace), Stellan Skarsgård (Avengers: Age of Ultron), Joana Ribeiro (A Uma Hora Incerta
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Terry Gilliam Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After 17 Years

  • Indiewire
Terry Gilliam Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After 17 Years
Terry Gilliam finally knocked down the windmill. After nearly two decades of work, several failed attempts and any number of different actors attached to the project, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has finally wrapped production. Gilliam — whose efforts to loosely adapt Miguel de Cervantes’ timeless novel inspired the documentary “Lost in La Mancha” — marked the occasion with a celebratory Facebook post.

“Sorry for the long silence. I’ve been busy packing the truck and am now heading home,” he wrote. “After 17 years, we have completed the shoot of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. Muchas gracias to all the team and believers. Quixote Vive!”
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Hits Yet Another Snag as Production Company Deems It ‘Patently Illegal’

  • Indiewire
‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Hits Yet Another Snag as Production Company Deems It ‘Patently Illegal’
The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has had so much trouble getting made that it would almost be a letdown if the long-gestating project ever sees the light of day. Terry Gilliam has been tilting at windmills for nearly 20 years at this point, and now the film has hit a new snag: Alfama Films released a statement on Friday deeming it “patently illegal.”

Read More: Terry Gilliam Has Begun Shooting ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,’ For Real This Time

Alfama’s Paulo Branco spoke to the Hollywood Reporter at Cannes, accusing Gilliam of “clandestinely” working on the film behind his back and even “pursuing the production with other partners.” Whether true or not, such a strange state of affairs is certainly apropos of the Cervantes’ charmingly (and tragically) out-of-his-depth knight errant.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” first entered pre-production in 1998 and, at one point or another, everyone from
See full article at Indiewire »

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote begins production (yes, really)

17 years after the plug was pulled on his first attempt, Terry Gilliam has now commenced production on his passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, IndieWire is reporting.

As announced last year (when the project was delayed once again), Star Wars: The Force Awakens star Adam Driver is set to take on the lead role originally portrayed by Johnny Depp in the abandoned 2000 version. However, it seems that Gilliam regular Jonathan Pryce (Brazil, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen) will now take on the role of Quixote, replacing Michael Palin (who himself replaced John Hurt, Robert Duvall and Jean Rochefort).

Joining Driver and Pryce in the cast are Olga Kurylenko (Quantum of Solace), Stellan Skarsgård (Avengers: Age of Ultron), Joana Ribeiro (A Uma Hora Incerta), Eva Basteiro-Bertoli (Black Bread) and Rossy de Palma (Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown).

Here’s the official synopsis for the project,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

I, Spy?: "The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe"

  • MUBI
Mubi is showing The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe (1972) from November 17 - December 16, 2016 in the United States.There is deception throughout The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe. Sometimes, it’s deliberate; sometimes, it’s not. From the sleight of hand card trickery that plays out under its opening credits to its hilariously enacted case of intentionally-mistaken identity, the film is an increasing volley of duplicity and modified perception. But it’s more than just what happens in the film. This 1972 spy movie send-up is itself a cleverly crafted ruse, a straight-faced farce that incorporates most everything one associates the cinematic sub-genre and slyly points out the subtle silliness inherent in its recurrent conventions. Characters and the viewer will often see something and assume it to mean something—one is accustomed to always looking for clues and revealing “tells” in a movie like this—only to have
See full article at MUBI »

Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote delayed again

In what is probably the least surprising piece of news this century, Terry Gilliam has revealed that his latest attempt at bringing The Man Who Killed Don Quixote to the screen has been delayed, just days before production was set to begin.

“I was supposed to start to be shooting it starting next Monday,” Gilliam told Jonathan Ross (via IndieWire). “It’s been slightly delayed. I had this producer, a Portuguese chap, who claimed he’d get all the money together in time. And a few weeks ago, he proved that he didn’t have the money. So we are still marching forward. It is not dead. I will be dead before the film is.”

Gilliam has long hoped to bring his adaptation of Miguel de Cervantes’ tale to life, including an abandoned version starring Johnny Depp and Jean Rochefort, which was shut down mid-production and chronicled in the 2002 documentary Lost in La Mancha,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites