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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

16 items from 2016


Olga Kurylenko joins Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, Johnny Depp may cameo

19 May 2016 12:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Earlier this week we brought you the news that Michael Palin (Monty Python) and Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Force Awakens) have signed on to appear in Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, and now The Tracking Board is reporting that Olga Kurylenko (Oblivion) has also signed on for the long-gestating film.

Gilliam has been trying to get the project off the ground since 1998, which includes an abandoned version from 2000 which would have starred Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp. According to the site, Gilliam has been hinting that Depp could make a cameo appearance in this latest effort.

Production on The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is slated to get underway in the fall ahead of a release next year.

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- Gary Collinson

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Terry Gilliam’s Don Quixote movie starts filming (again) in October

18 May 2016 9:55 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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It's finally, finally happening: Adam Driver and Michael Palin are set to star in the latest attempt to get Don Quixote made...

Around 20 years after he last, unsuccessfully, tried to get the film made, Terry Gilliam is finally getting The Man Who Killed Don Quixote before the cameras. The film has fresh funding, with its $19m budget allowing shooting to take place across Portugal, the Canary Islands and Spain.

What’s more, Gilliam has revealed that the film will finally start shooting in October.

The first attempt to film Don Quixote is almost a legend in film history itself. Work first started nearly two decades ago, but production had to be abandoned after filming had begun, when lead actor Jean Rochefort fell ill. The story of the failed production is told compelling in the documentary Lost In La Mancha, a film we heartily recommend.

Things look much more positive this time around, »

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Terry Gilliam Saddles Up for ‘Don Quixote’ After 20-Year Journey

18 May 2016 7:23 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Updated: After nearly two decades of missteps and mishaps, filming on the latest iteration of Terry Gilliam’s ill-fated “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is due to start in October, with former Bond girl Olga Kurylenko added to a new cast that includes Adam Driver and Michael Palin.

Gilliam announced Wednesday that preparation on his pet project would begin next month and would be shot in Spain, Portugal and the Canary Islands, to be finished by Christmas. Portuguese producer Paulo Branco signed up earlier this year on the film, which is budgeted at $19 million.

“I want to get this film out of my life so I can get on with the rest of my life,” a jovial and relaxed-looking Gilliam said at a press conference in Cannes.

He told Variety that the film kept nagging at him despite his having completed other movies in the interim, such as 2013’s “The Zero Theorem. »

- Henry Chu

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Adam Driver Joins Gilliam's "Quixote"

17 May 2016 12:02 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Adam Driver and Michael Palin are set to take over the lead roles in the newest incarnation of Terry Gilliam's long-gestating and long-suffering passion project "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote".

Alfama Films, Tornasol Films and Leopardo Filmes are teaming up to co-produce the $18 million budget project which will go before cameras in September with Paulo Branco producing.

It marks the latest go at filming on 'Man', a riff on Miguel de Cervantes' legendary novel about a modern man who goes back in time and joins the titular character on an epic quest. Gilliam first attempted to adapt it around the turn of the century with both Johnny Depp and Jean Rochefort starring.

As soon as filming began, things went wrong - Nato tested aircraft, a flash flood wiped out sets, and Rochefort had a major injury. The project collapsed. Gilliam has since tried to get the film off the ground several times, »

- Garth Franklin

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Adam Driver set to star in Terry Gilliam’s 'Don Quixote'

11 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Force Awakens actor is circling the passion project alongside Monty Python’s Michael Palin.

Terry Gilliam’s long-gestating project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is shaping up to shoot in the autumn with a hot new star – Adam Driver.

Fresh from Star Wars blockbuster The Force Awakens, Driver could bring fresh life to the film that has been in the pipeline for nearly 20 years, when the role was originally intended for Johnny Depp.

The role of Quixote, first played by Jean Rochefort when Gilliam mounted an ill-fated production in 1998, will be taken on by Gilliam’s fellow Monty Python member, Michael Palin.

The project, recently revived by Gilliam with veteran Portuguese producer Paulo Branco’s Alfama Films which is selling the project at the Cannes Market, is shaping up to shoot this autumn.

The story of how production stopped after Rochefort was injured was recounted in 2002 documentary Lost In La Mancha. Since then, Gilliam »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Gilliam To Try "Don Quixote" Again This Fall

1 April 2016 7:42 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Terry Gilliam's long in the works and always troubled dream project, "The Man Who Killed Quixote," will be making an attempt to go before the cameras once again later this year.

THR says Alfama Films, Tornasol Films and Leopardo Filmes are teaming up to co-produce the $18 million budget project which will go before cameras in September with Paulo Branco producing.

It marks the latest go at filming on 'Man', a riff on Miguel de Cervantes' legendary novel about a modern man who goes back in time and joins the titular character on an epic quest. Gilliam first attempted to adapt it around the turn of the century with both Johnny Depp and Jean Rochefort starring.

As soon as filming began, things went wrong - Nato tested aircraft, a flash flood wiped out sets, and Rochefort had a major injury. The project collapsed. Gilliam has since tried to get »

- Garth Franklin

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Terry Gilliam gets greenlight to restart Don Quixote film

1 April 2016 7:15 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jack O’Connell and John Hurt to star in long-delayed Cervantes adaptation that was abandoned in 1999 after series of disasters struck shoot

Terry Gilliam finally has the go-ahead to restart shooting on his long-delayed adaptation of Cervantes’ Don Quixote 17 years after it was abandoned, it has been announced.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote will begin filming in September after financing was provided by Cosmopolis producer Paulo Branco. The budget has been set at €16m (£12.8m), and the film will feature John Hurt and Unbroken’s Jack O’Connell in roles originally occupied by Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp.

Continue reading »

- Andrew Pulver

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Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote to start shooting in September

1 April 2016 2:34 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

After years of aborted attempts to bring his vision to the screen, it looks like Terry Gilliam is finally set to get underway on his long-gestating The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.

This week has brought fresh hope for Gilliam after Paris-based film company Alfama Films, run by Paulo Branco, has come aboard to produce the film. A budget of around 16 million euros has been set, with shooting to take place during September in Spain and Portugal.

Gilliam’s film is based on the classic novel by Miguel de Cervantes and offers a “modern and satirical twist” on the novel. In the previous version, John Hurt (Hercules) and Jack O’Connell (Unbroken) were set to play the leads but both roles will now be re-cast.

The acclaimed director previously had Johnny Depp and Jean Rochefort attached  to star in the film when it began shooting in 2001 but after many on-set problems, »

- Scott J. Davis

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Terry Gilliam’s Don Quixote movie is finally getting made

31 March 2016 11:45 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Terry Gilliam’s Quixotic attempt to make The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is finally set to be rewarded...

People were beginning to think Terry Gilliam was tilting at windmills in his quest to film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, but it looks like that impossible dream will finally be dreamed.

The Brazil director’s now mythical vision will be financed by Alfama FilmsPaulo Branco, who made Cosmopolis and Mysteries Of Lisbon. The film will be made on an $18.2 million budget. The latest attempt was delayed by actor John Hurt's diagnosis of pancreatic cancer early last year. Hurt was cleared for work by his doctors in October, but may not be involved in the project any more. Jack O'Connell, however, is in line for a role.

The story of the making of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote of course is a great story in itself. »

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Terry Gilliam’s 'Don Quixote' lines up September shoot

31 March 2016 8:46 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Shoot is due to take place in Spain and Portugal on long-gestating project, now joined by producer Paolo Branco.

Producer Paulo Branco (Cosmopolis) has boarded Terry Gilliam’s long-in-gestation The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, which the director has been struggling to produce since 1998.

According to a simple release headlined “Paulo Branco to produce Terry Gilliam’s mythical project”, principal photography will start in September 2016, with the shoot taking place in Spain and Portugal.

Branco’s Paris-based Alfama Films is producing the feature with Spanish outfit Tornasol Films and Leopardo Films. It is budgeted at $18.2m (€16m), according to the release.

The feature, based on a screenplay by Gilliam and Tony Grisoni, is loosely based on Miguel de Cervantes’s iconic novel Don Quixote.

There was no detail on who would play Quixote or Toby Grisoni – a time-travelling sidekick added to the story in Gilliam and Grisoni’s screen version. 

Gilliam first tried »

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Terry Gilliam’s 'Don Quixote' gears up for September shoot

31 March 2016 8:46 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Shoot is due to take place in Spain and Portugal on long-gestating project, now joined by producer Paulo Branco.

Producer Paulo Branco (Cosmopolis) has boarded Terry Gilliam’s long-in-gestation The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, which the director has been struggling to produce since 1998.

According to a simple release headlined “Paulo Branco to produce Terry Gilliam’s mythical project”, principal photography will start in September 2016, with the shoot taking place in Spain and Portugal.

Branco’s Paris-based Alfama Films is producing the feature with Spanish outfit Tornasol Films and Leopardo Films. It is budgeted at $18.2m (€16m), according to the release.

The feature, based on a screenplay by Gilliam and Tony Grisoni, is loosely based on Miguel de Cervantes’s iconic novel Don Quixote.

There was no detail on who would play Quixote or Toby Grisoni – a time-travelling sidekick added to the story in Gilliam and Grisoni’s screen version. 

Gilliam first tried »

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Review: 'April and the Extraordinary World' is an Ingenious & Sumptuously Designed Steampunk Marvel

25 March 2016 3:54 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

An invention, the tangible result from an idea constructed in the human imagination, represents a piece in the puzzle that is the course of progress whether it means advancement through bellic endeavors, the simplification of tasks, or the preservation of life. Modern civilization is the result of a sequence of inventions and discoveries that evolved through the efforts of tireless men and woman dedicated to science and technology; however, as it’s always the case, mankind has been know to use its most creative minds for selfish and power-hungry pursuits.

Setting these concepts and preoccupations in an alternative steampunk reality based on the graphic novel by Jacques TardiChristian Desmares and Franck Ekinci’s  “April and the Extraordinary World” navigates the curious possibility of a world where innovation stalled and in which humans must deal with the ramifications of this occurrence and adapt their lifestyles to the available practices. What emerges from this concoction of brilliant notions inspired by the source material and the filmmakers’ input is a highly ingenious and sumptuously designed tale anchored to an assertive, intellectual, and unconventional heroine. This delightfully sophisticated charmer firmly establishes itself as a visual marvel and one of the most originally confected animated films ever made. 

Distancing its premise from similarly themed science fiction escapades, which work under the pretense that audiences must accept the universe at hand without much insight into its inner workings and origins, the film commences with a brief introduction that singles out a historical event responsible for the retrograde state of development. In this whimsical revision set in the mid-1900s Napoleon's lineage still reigns, as a major conflict with France's major enemy to the east was avoided. The consequential outcome for this deviation is a world in which coal, rather than oil, becomes the preferred fuel leading to massive deforestation and smog substitutes air. Scientists are perceived as a commodity whose brilliance must benefit the empire in its pursuit of new lands with forests to harvest. Fighting a war with the Us over Canada’s natural resources to fulfill its power needs is France’s priority while another threat develops under its surface.

Academically gifted an empowered by an audacious spirit, April (Marion Cotillard) is a young woman whose perpetual mission is to find her parents, Paul (Olivier Gourmet) and Annette (Macha Grenon), and grandfather Pops (Jean Rochefort), all of whom are scientist that disappeared 10 years prior under mysterious circumstances after being persecuted by the authorities just as they were about to test a serum that would make any living creature immortal. Now, April, whose chemistry knowledge is unparalleled, is attempting to recreate said formula and reunite with her singular pack.

Given that her venture and those of her immediate family have such immeasurable stakes, there are a few less than friendly figures seeking to capture her. Pizoni (Bouli Lanners), a robust, arrogant, and insanely persistent officer, wishes to use her as a vehicle for discovering where Pops is. Enlisting Julius (Marc-André Grondin), a scrawny young man willing to do the dirty work to avoid punishment for his deeds, to follow her, Pizoni hopes to regain the status he lost because of April’s folks. Thankfully, the brave girl has her talking cat Darwin (Philippe Katerine) as her most valuable comrade. Talking animals have never been so unforgettably enchanting and comically joyful as April's pet. Romantic and irreverent, Darwin is a scene-stealer that keeps one grinning continuously due to his amusingly tongue-in-cheek one-liners.

An array of characters like this pair with astoundingly intelligent writing makes for a framework that is taken to its greatest possible potential for wonder via the gorgeously crafted animation in display. Add a large portion of explosively candid humor to the mix, and the formula for a perfect work of wondrous art is created. From Einstein playing in a band, to a visual gag on what the Statue of Liberty would like if France wouldn’t have been friendly towards Americans, to its mesmerizing reimagining of Paris with two Eiffel Towers and uniquely appropriate public transport and infrastructure, “April” grabs hold of cell animation and dips it in a potion distilled from the works of iconic Japanese masters and considerable influence from other successful graphic novel adaptations into the medium.

Its genre-bending aspects are so fabulously calibrated, that is hard to pinpoint an exact designation for the spell the film casts other than how deliciously twisty it is. Near its final act, “April” introduces a group of villains directly extracted from a deranged fable, in the most authentically surprising manner. This coincides with the sensibilities of a film that isn’t afraid to fully experiment with the freedoms that fiction in this vein permits. Desmaeres and Ekinci’s leading lady, voiced with grace and chutzpah by Academy Award-winner Marion Cotillard, comes from a long line of male scientists, but though the fact that she is the first female born in the family to also pursue the field, her gender is never observed as an impediment or particularly special trait. It’s never about whether she can do it not based on her being a woman, but about how her unquestionable abilities can be used for good. When so much of current media glorifies instant fame or content about exploiting physical beauty for financial gain, to see an intrepid role model focused on the significance of using one’s hard work for the greater good utterly reinvigorating.

Power corrupts, especially in the hands of temperamental beings, and that’s a crucial point that “April” tackles from a thoroughly enjoyable perspective. Since selfish pursuits are common occurrences in our past and present, it’s clear humanity can’t be trusted with its own treasures. Therefore, erudite thinkers are recruited as pawns in a new intergalactic plan to save Earth’s beautiful vegetation. The uncompromising ambition of the film’s scope is as captivating as the detailed cinematic frames that convey it, and in that sense, the exuberant journey it follows from its opening sequence to the riveting conclusion feels like a natural progression. Not a single contrived or even lightly forced plot point in sight.

As the pages reminiscent of comic books from a much more artistically driven bygone era grace the screen in their moving iteration, “April and the Extraordinary World” transcends the constraints of steampunk literature and embraces traditional animation is if the two had been in perfect symmetry from the beginning. What “April” argues underneath the aesthetically extraordinary frames and its thrilling action is that science is magic at human reach, which takes our perseverance and purpose as a metaphorical wand. Choosing to use each newly found incantation for benevolent causes and not malevolent desires is the real battle.

"April and the Extraordinary World" is now playing in New York and Los Angeles. The film is being released by Gkids, the 8-time Academy nominated independent animation distributor. 

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- Carlos Aguilar

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Review: Christian Desmares & Franck Ekinci's Imaginative Animated Wonder 'April And The Extraordinary World'

25 March 2016 7:35 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The opportunity for CGI and animation to completely immerse the viewer in an imagined world gets fully realized in a way few films achieve with Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci's wondrous “April and the Extraordinary World.” Set in a steampunk version of Paris, this French import marries both style and substance in its efforts to present a wholly original vision adapted from the work of graphic novelist Jacques Tardi, creator of "Adèle Blanc-Sec" (which itself was turned into a 2010 film directed by Luc Besson). “April and the Extraordinary World” is kind enough to give details on its imagined history, as much of its audience may not be familiar with the Franco-Prussian War and what its absence might mean to the larger timeline presented. In the 1870s, Napoleon III has tasked Gustave (voiced by Jean Rochefort) with creating an army of super soldiers. The experiment goes wrong, killing the leader »

- Kimber Myers

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[Review] April and the Extraordinary World

24 March 2016 11:34 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Most writing on Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci‘s April and the Extraordinary World speaks as though they’ve adapted one of revered Frenchman Jacques Tardi‘s graphic novels. This isn’t quite the case. What they’ve actually done is bring his unique “universe” to life with help from previous collaborator Benjamin Legrand (writer of Tardi’s Tueur de cafards) instead. Legrand and Ekinci crafted this alternate steampunk version of Paris as something inspired by the artist’s work rather than born from it. Tardi in turn helped by drawing original work later brought to life by Desmares’ animation team. The whole is therefore a culmination of its six-year production schedule populated by multiple creative minds working in tandem throughout. It may look familiar, but it’s very much brand new.

Their world is built on steam and coal because the best scientific minds have disappeared. Electricity wasn’t »

- Jared Mobarak

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‘Persepolis’ Producers Offer French Steampunk Actioner In ‘April and the Extraordinary World’ Trailer

21 March 2016 12:53 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since premiering last summer, the animated picture April and the Extraordinary World has earned fine notices, being praised for both the beauty of its animation and unique stylings of its world. It was only a matter of time before this ’40s-era, Paris-set steampunk tale came to the U.S., and GKids are supporting its English-language overhaul with a release this Friday — just after a domestic trailer arrives.

There are no signs of its original French cast — which included Marion Cotillard, Olivier Gourmet, and Jean Rochefort — but what we get isn’t so bad: J.K. Simmons, Tony Hale, Susan Sarandon, and Paul Giamatti have stepped in, while Angela Galuppo takes the lead role. This preview will give some sense of its narrative and visual approach, two components that reviewers noted as being in harmony with one another.

Watch it below:

Synopsis:

Paris, 1941. A family of scientists is on the brink of »

- Nick Newman

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Aaron Reviews Christian Desmares and Franck Ekinci’s April and the Extraordinary World [Piff 2016]

13 February 2016 8:00 AM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

April and the Extraordinary World is a uniquely French animated tale, with elements of steampunk and Jules Verne. It is set in an elaborate revisionist, alternate history, where the world was drastically altered from the Napoleonic era. By the 1930s, the world’s technology is still centered on steam and coal, and there is a decidedly anti-science stance from the empire in power. Rather than gas powered automobile, railway or aircraft for transportation, they rely on steam-powered automobiles, dirigibles, and cable cars. The latter will allow someone to travel from Paris to Berlin in a mere 82 hours.

The animated images of this alternate version of Paris are almost always captivating, and sometimes breathtaking. The aesthetic complements the fast-paced, adventurous narrative, as April dangerously tries to continue her parents illicit scientific legacy. It is a riveting and enjoyable journey with strong voice acting from familiar stars such as Marion Cotillard, Jean Rochefort and Olivier Gourmet. »

- Aaron West

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

16 items from 2016


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