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2013 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2013


Paramount’s Longest Employee, A.C. Lyles, Dies at 95

30 September 2013 10:41 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A.C. Lyles, whose long association with Paramount began when he was 10 years old, died Friday in Los Angeles. He was 95.

Lyles started out at Paramount working for Adolph Zukor more than 80 years ago, worked as a studio publicist for many years and even served as a producer on HBO’s “Deadwood.”

Lyles was one of the last of a breed who made the transition from the old classic studio system to the new Hollywood. Eminently likable and adaptable, Lyles worked his way up from the mailroom and labored for many years in publicity and advertising, giving him an understanding of every facet of the making and selling of motion pictures. Lyles went on to produce low-budget Westerns, and later, television movies and series.

Except for a brief period on his own, he hung his hat at Paramount throughout his exceptionally long career. Such an expert was he on the company »

- Carmel Dagan

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In Memoriam: How the Emmys Tributes Went

22 September 2013 7:31 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Special tributes during the Primetime Emmys to Cory Monteith, James Gandolfini, Jean Stapleton, Jonathan Winters and Gary David Goldberg, each of whom passed away in the past year, came as leadouts to commercials, beginning nearly 30 minutes into the ceremony.

Jane Lynch presented the tribute to “Glee” co-star Monteith.

“I’m here to say that all that warmth and that charm, that open-hearted quality we loved him for, was no act,” Lynch said, adding that his death was a reminder of the “painful” effects of addiction.

“For a generation that loved Cory so, this gifted and wonderful young man was worthy of your love,” Lynch said.

Edie Falco, co-star of Gandolfini on “The Sopranos,” grew emotional during her concluding tribute.

“His portrayal of Tony Soprano had such depth and dimension that a lot of people had trouble believing that’s not really who he was,” Falco said. “Jim was quite different. »

- Jon Weisman

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Beautiful, Lighthearted Fox Star Suffered Many Real-Life Tragedies

26 August 2013 1:47 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Jeanne Crain: Lighthearted movies vs. real life tragedies (photo: Madeleine Carroll and Jeanne Crain in ‘The Fan’) (See also: "Jeanne Crain: From ‘Pinky’ Inanity to ‘MargieMagic.") Unlike her characters in Margie, Home in Indiana, State Fair, Centennial Summer, The Fan, and Cheaper by the Dozen (and its sequel, Belles on Their Toes), or even in the more complex A Letter to Three Wives and People Will Talk, Jeanne Crain didn’t find a romantic Happy Ending in real life. In the mid-’50s, Crain accused her husband, former minor actor Paul Brooks aka Paul Brinkman, of infidelity, of living off her earnings, and of brutally beating her. The couple reportedly were never divorced because of their Catholic faith. (And at least in the ’60s, unlike the humanistic, progressive-thinking Margie, Crain was a “conservative” Republican who supported Richard Nixon.) In the early ’90s, she lost two of her »

- Andre Soares

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Dale Robertson obituary

1 March 2013 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Taciturn hero of film and television westerns

In Hollywood, in the days when men were men, Dale Robertson, who has died aged 89, was considered the epitome of masculinity. In the Clarion Call episode from O Henry's Full House (1952), a giggling, snivelling crook, played by Richard Widmark, whom Robertson, a cop, has come to arrest, keeps calling him "the beeg man". Robertson, an ex-prize fighter, was indeed "beeg" – tall, well-built and ruggedly handsome, with a gravelly voice. He was tough but fair to men, and courteous to ladies, particularly in the many westerns in which he starred in the 1950s, and in his most famous role, that of special investigator Jim Hardie in the TV series Tales of Wells Fargo.

He was born Dayle Lymoine Robertson, in Harrah, Oklahoma, and attended Oklahoma Military Academy, Claremore, where he was named "all around outstanding athlete". During the second world war, he served with Patton's Third Army, »

- Ronald Bergan

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Dale Robertson, Star of Movie and TV Westerns, Dead at 89

28 February 2013 10:43 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Dale Robertson, who hosted TV western series "Death Valley Days" and starred in a number of big-screen westerns in the '50s and '60s, died Wednesday at the age of 89 of complications from lung cancer. Younger audiences would remember him from appearances on "Dallas" and "Dynasty"; he also starred in "J.J. Starbuck," which ran on NBC for one season from 1987 to 1988. He died in San Diego, Calif., his wife Susan told the New York Times. Also read: Hollywood Says Goodbye: Notable Celebrity Deaths of 2012 Born Dayle Lymoine Robertson on July 14, »

- Tim Kenneally

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R.I.P. Dale Robertson

28 February 2013 10:15 AM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Dale Robertson, best remembered for his roles in television and movie Westerns, has died. His niece Nancy Robertson tells the Associated Press her uncle died Tuesday at a hospital in La Jolla, CA following a brief illness. He was 89. Dale Robertson had small roles in films beginning in the late 1940s, including The Boy With The Green Hair and Flamingo Road. He went on to play Jesse James in Fighting Man Of The Plains before moving into television in the 1950s. His best remembered series were Tales Of Wells FargoIron Horse, and Death Valley Days (1968-70). He also played the lead role in the first of A. C. Lyles’ second feature Westerns, Law Of The Lawless. He continued working in TV in the 1970s and 1980s, landing roles in the popular night-time soap operas Dallas and Dynasty. His final role was Zeke in TV’s Harts Of The West. »

- THE DEADLINE TEAM

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Dale Robertson obituary

28 February 2013 8:54 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Taciturn hero of film and television westerns

In Hollywood, in the days when men were men, Dale Robertson, who has died aged 89, was considered the epitome of masculinity. In the Clarion Call episode from O Henry's Full House (1952), a giggling, snivelling crook, played by Richard Widmark, whom Robertson, a cop, has come to arrest, keeps calling him "the beeg man". Robertson, an ex-prize fighter, was indeed "beeg" – tall, well-built and ruggedly handsome, with a gravelly voice. He was tough but fair to men, and courteous to ladies, particularly in the many westerns in which he starred in the 1950s, and in his most famous role, that of special investigator Jim Hardie in the TV series Tales of Wells Fargo.

He was born Dayle Lymoine Robertson, in Harrah, Oklahoma, and attended Oklahoma Military Academy, Claremore, where he was named "all around outstanding athlete". During the second world war, he served with Patton's Third Army, »

- Ronald Bergan

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'Tales of Wells Fargo' Star Dies At Age 89

27 February 2013 8:40 PM, PST | Huffington Post | See recent Huffington Post news »

Oklahoma City — Dale Robertson, an Oklahoma native who became a star of television and movie Westerns during the genre's heyday, died Tuesday. He was 89.

Robertson's niece, Nancy Robertson, said her uncle died at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., following a brief illness.

Dale Robertson had bit parts in films including "The Boy with the Green Hair" and the Joan Crawford vehicle "Flamingo Road" before landing more high-profile roles such as Jesse James in "Fighting Man of the Plains."

In the 1950s, he moved into television, starring in series such as "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957-62), "Iron Horse" (1966) and "Death Valley Days" (1968-70).

Robertson continued to work in TV in the 1970s, and in the 1980s he landed roles in the popular night-time soap operas "Dallas" and "Dynasty."

In 1993, he took what would be his final role, as Zeke in the show "Harts of the West," before retiring from »

- AP

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TV Western star Dale Robertson dies at 89

27 February 2013 8:31 PM, PST | Pop2it | See recent Pop2it news »

Dale Robertson, a star of television westerns in the 1950s and 60s, died Wednesday at 89 years old from lung cancer and pneumonia, THR reports. An Oklahoma native, Robertson was best-known for the role of Jim Hardie, the "left handed gun," on NBC's "Tales of Wells Fargo," which ran from 1957-1962.

He also starred as railroad tycoon Ben Calhoun on ABC's "Iron Horse," and as the title character of NBC's "J.J. Starbuck." Robertson had parts on iconic TV shows "Dynasty," and "Dallas," and was the narrator on "Death Valley Days," following in the steps of the show's previous narrator, Ronald Reagan.

Robertson also starred in a handful of films, including "The Farmer Takes a Wife," which co-starred Betty Grable. Before his career in TV and film, Robertson served in World War II, where he was awarded both bronze and silver stars after being wounded twice.

Robertson took his Hollywood earnings, »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Dale Robertson, Star of TV Westerns, Dies at 89

27 February 2013 5:52 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Dale Robertson, a veteran of movies and TV Westerns of the 1950s and ’60s who played “the left-handed gun” on NBC’s Tales of Wells Fargo, died Wednesday of lung cancer and pneumonia in a San Diego hospital. He was 89. An Oklahoma native and member of the Cowboy Hall of Fame, Robertson also starred as gambler-turned-railroad tycoon Ben Calhoun in Iron Horse, which ran on ABC from 1966-68, and as the Texas billionaire title character in NBC’s 1987-88 adventure series J.J. Starbuck, from Stephen J. Cannell Productions. The tall, handsome Robertson also had recurring

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- Mike Barnes

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2013 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2013


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