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Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s
Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A crunchy, witty, and often just plain funny mash-up of classic noir tropes, from hard-boiled private dicks to the easy-on-the-eyes femme fatales – in addition to dialogue worthy of Dashiell Hammett and, occasionally
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Night Moves

Arthur Penn’s detective movie is one of the best ever in the genre, one that rewards repeat viewings particularly well. Gumshoe Harry Moseby compartmentalizes his marriage, his job, his past and the greedy Hollywood has-beens he meets, not realizing that everything is interconnected, and fully capable of assembling a world-class conspiracy. Gene Hackman tops a sterling cast in the film that introduced most of us to Melanie Griffith.

Night Moves

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date August 15, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gene Hackman, Jennifer Warren, Melanie Griffith, Susan Clark, Edward Binns, Harris Yulin, Kenneth Mars, Janet Ward, James Woods, Anthony Costello.

Cinematography: Bruce Surtees

Production Designer: George Jenkins

Film Editor: Dede Allen

Original Music: Michael Small

Written by Alan Sharp

Produced by Robert M. Sherman

Directed by Arthur Penn

Night Moves is a superb detective thriller that plays with profound ideas without getting its fingers burned.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The 20 Best Crime Films of the 21st Century, From ‘Memento’ to ‘Zodiac’

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Crime Films of the 21st Century, From ‘Memento’ to ‘Zodiac’
No genre illustrates the evolution of cinema better than the crime film. As recently as the ’90s, Hollywood regularly released stories of cops-and-robber showdowns and mystery-thrillers based on best-selling novels — but as the middle class continues to disappear from Hollywood films, smart crime stories moved to television (see: “The Sopranos,” “The Wire,” “Breaking Bad,” “The Night Of,” et. al.).

Outside the studios, there is a longstanding tradition – from the B-movies to the Coen brothers – of new directors showcasing their filmmaking chops with dark, stylish, and intense crime sagas. A surge of new filmmakers in the ’90s brought fresh interpretations to the genre, from the pastiche of “Reservoir Dogs” to the unnerving realism in “Boyz n the Hood.”

Read MoreThe 50 Best Films of the ’90s, From ‘Pulp Fiction’ to ‘Groundhog Day

These days, many of the best contemporary directors — including Martin Scorsese, David Fincher, Mann, the Coens, Park Chan-wook and Spike Lee – still love the genre,
See full article at Indiewire »

Strike: The Cuckoo’s Calling episode 1 review

Louisa Mellor Aug 27, 2017

Jk Rowling-created detective Cormoran Strike arrives on the BBC in a solid hour of traditional murder mystery…

This review contains spoilers.

See related Timothy V. Murphy interview: True Detective season 2 True Detective season 2 episode 8 review: Omega Station True Detective season 2 episode 7 review: Black Maps And Motel Rooms True Detective season 2 episode 6 review: Church In Ruins True Detective season 2 episode 5 review: Other Lives

Sherlock Holmes. Hercule Poirot. Veronica Mars. Endeavour Morse. Unlikely names are clearly the birthright of any decent fictional Pi. Even the relatively conventional Sam Spade and John Shaft sound like characters christened by Vic and Bob when you think about it.

Cormoran Strike though, the creation of thriller novelist Robert Galbraith (himself the creation of Jk Rowling) takes the Pi biscuit. It’s a fabulously implausible name that belongs on the 1940s cover of a boys’ own adventure comic. Cormoran. Strike. Half mythical Cornish giant,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel

Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel
'The Magnificent Ambersons': Directed by Orson Welles, and starring Tim Holt (pictured), Dolores Costello (in the background), Joseph Cotten, Anne Baxter, and Agnes Moorehead, this Academy Award-nominated adaptation of Booth Tarkington's novel earned Ricardo Cortez's brother Stanley Cortez an Academy Award nomination for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White. He lost to Joseph Ruttenberg for William Wyler's blockbuster 'Mrs. Miniver.' Two years later, Cortez – along with Lee Garmes – would win Oscar statuettes for their evocative black-and-white work on John Cromwell's homefront drama 'Since You Went Away,' starring Ricardo Cortez's 'Torch Singer' leading lady, Claudette Colbert. In all, Stanley Cortez would receive cinematography credit in more than 80 films, ranging from B fare such as 'The Lady in the Morgue' and the 1940 'Margie' to Fritz Lang's 'Secret Beyond the Door,' Charles Laughton's 'The Night of the Hunter,' and Nunnally Johnson's 'The Three Faces
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Cortez: Biographer Van Neste Discusses Paramount's 'Valentino Threat'

Remembering Cortez: Biographer Van Neste Discusses Paramount's 'Valentino Threat'
Ricardo Cortez: Although never as big a star as fellow 1920s screen heartthrobs Rudolph Valentino, Ramon Novarro, and John Gilbert, Cortez had a long – and, to some extent, prestigious – film career, appearing in nearly 100 movies between 1923 and 1950. Among his directors: Allan Dwan, Cecil B. DeMille, D.W. Griffith, James Cruze, Alexander Korda, Herbert Brenon, Roy Del Ruth, Frank Lloyd, Gregory La Cava, William A. Wellman, Alexander Hall, Lloyd Bacon, Tay Garnett, Archie Mayo, Raoul Walsh, Frank Capra, Walter Lang, Michael Curtiz, and John Ford. See previous post: “Remembering Ricardo Cortez: Hollywood's Silent “Latin Lover” & Star of Original 'The Maltese Falcon'.” First of all, why Ricardo Cortez? Since I began writing about classic movies and vintage filmmakers roughly 30 years ago, people have always been curious why I choose particular subjects. It sounds kind of corny, but I have always wanted to do original work and perhaps make a minor contribution to film history at the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

After Valentino and Before Bogart There Was Cortez: 'The Magnificent Heel' and the Movies' Original Sam Spade

After Valentino and Before Bogart There Was Cortez: 'The Magnificent Heel' and the Movies' Original Sam Spade
Ricardo Cortez biography 'The Magnificent Heel: The Life and Films of Ricardo Cortez' – Paramount's 'Latin Lover' threat to a recalcitrant Rudolph Valentino, and a sly, seductive Sam Spade in the original film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's 'The Maltese Falcon.' 'The Magnificent Heel: The Life and Films of Ricardo Cortez': Author Dan Van Neste remembers the silent era's 'Latin Lover' & the star of the original 'The Maltese Falcon' At odds with Famous Players-Lasky after the release of the 1922 critical and box office misfire The Young Rajah, Rudolph Valentino demands a fatter weekly paycheck and more control over his movie projects. The studio – a few years later to be reorganized under the name of its distribution arm, Paramount – balks. Valentino goes on a “one-man strike.” In 42nd Street-style, unknown 22-year-old Valentino look-alike contest winner Jacob Krantz of Manhattan steps in, shortly afterwards to become known worldwide as Latin Lover Ricardo Cortez of
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tom Cruise: A Star in Slow-Motion Career Meltdown

Tom Cruise: A Star in Slow-Motion Career Meltdown
If there’s one thing you can count on when you see a Tom Cruise franchise action movie, it’s the look on his face. It is cool and poised, sleek and alert; it’s all dashing resolve. But during “The Mummy,” I kept looking at Cruise and having a strange sensation, which is that the emotion those familiar features seemed to be radiating was, in a word, confusion. Throughout the movie, he looked a little slack and a little blank, a little what-the-heck-is-going-on? It could, theoretically, have been an element of Cruise’s performance. His character, a tomb raider named Nick Morton, gets invaded by the spirit of an Egyptian mummy; his soul then becomes a battleground between good and evil (at least, that’s the idea). That could be enough to leave one confused. The truth is, though, that the slightly discombobulated look on Cruise’s face throughout
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Forgotten: Claude Miller's "Deadly Circuit" (1983)

Michel Serrault, like his co-star here, Isabelle Adjani, used to be in everything. As ubiquitous as Depardieu. La cage aux folles might be his best-known film. Despite his omnipresence, he seems surprising casting as a private eye known only as "the Eye," but then he does have inverted Vs for eyebrows, just like Hammett's description of Sam Spade.The Eye has a class photograph of a group of schoolgirls. He's talking to his ex-wife on the phone. She won't tell him which one is his daughter. He guesses wrong. He'll be allowed another guess in a year. There are about thirty kids to choose from.What a brilliant opening scene! We'll forgive the strutting eighties music and neo-noir Venetian blind shadows. This is a film besotted with movie-ness and wallowing in plot contrivance, but it's also perverse, haunted and romantic. The Eye is warned against letting his new case get too complicated.
See full article at MUBI »

The Maltese Falcon Kicks of the ‘Classics On the Loop’ Series Wednesday at The Tivoli

“The stuff that dreams are made of.”

The Maltese Falcon screens Wednesday April 5th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as the first installment of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Frequently considered the first – and finest – example of film noir filmmaking in Hollywood, 1941’s classic The Maltese Falcon will cast its mysterious shadows on the silver screen once again at the Tivoli

Here’s the rare chance for movie buffs to see it in on the big screen, while a new generation can discover the secrets of the infamous “black bird” by seeing it for the first time. Originally released on Oct. 3, 1941, as the nation braced itself for the possibility of war, The Maltese Falcon launched John Huston’s directorial career with the story of high-living
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Filmmaker John Singleton Rides the Peak TV Wave to Recharge His Career

Filmmaker John Singleton Rides the Peak TV Wave to Recharge His Career
The Uber driver can’t come fast enough for John Singleton.

The filmmaker is hopping between studio lots in Hollywood on a warm afternoon in early November as he tends to the two drama series he’s launching this year: Bet’s “Rebel” and FX’s “Snowfall.”

At the Lot complex just off Formosa, Singleton is working with longtime collaborators on the sound mix and other post-production touches for the two-hour telepic that will introduce “Rebel” on March 28. In a nutshell, the series, Singleton explains, is “ ‘Shaft’ with a black woman.”

After reviewing the progress on “Rebel,” Singleton, 49, hurries out to the street, searching for the Uber while talking a blue streak, punctuated by a distinctive high-pitched giggle when he really wants to make a point. He’s revved up about the promise of the series and the breakout potential of his star, Danielle Moné Truitt.

“I call it film noir with neo soul, neo
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Classics In The Loop’ – Wednesday Night ‘Classic Crime & Noir’ Film Series at The Tivoli Begins April 5th

There’s nothing more fun than getting to watch classic movies the way they were intended–on the big screen!

Now, I understand plenty of people don’t want to go to a theater, spend a fortune on tickets, popcorn, and a drink just to see the glow of cell phones and hear people rudely talking while someone kicks your seat from behind, but that’s not the experience you’ll get at Landmark theaters affordable ‘Crime & Noir’ film series. St. Louis movie buffs are in for a treat as Landmark’s The Tivoli Theater will return with it’s ‘Classics on the Loop’ every Wednesday beginning April 5th at 7pm. This season, the Tivoli will screen, on their big screen (which seats 320 btw), eight crime and noir masterpiece that need to be seen in a theater with an audience. Admission is only $7.

One benefits of the big screen is
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

It Came From The Tube: Cast A Deadly Spell (1991)

Melding together genres seldom works. It’s a delicate balancing act; tone is key, and when either (or both) are off the whole thing can come crashing down. By 1991, HBO was already offering up original programming and decided to create a whole new sub genre – horror noir. The result was Cast a Deadly Spell, a very entertaining and perfectly concocted mixture of 1940s detective story and supernatural terror. And when the balance is right, like it is here, the results are sublime.

Originally airing on HBO on Saturday, September 7th, CaDS was met with critical acclaim as a riotous mashup of Bogart and the Dark Arts, treating audiences to a unique blend of murder and magic.

Let’s open up our sacred book of incantations, TV Guide, and see what we’re in for:

Cast A Deadly Spell (HBO, Sept. 7th)

L.A., 1948. Private eye Harry Philip Lovecraft is hired
See full article at DailyDead »

It Came From The Tube: The Night Stalker (1972)

Sometimes it’s hard to put a fresh coat of paint on an old house. The colors can bleed through no matter how many new layers are added, giving the house a look of desperation from a block away. But sometimes the right paint is used, the restoration is done with love and affection, and the new owners actually care about their surroundings. Such is the case with The Night Stalker (1972), the ABC TV movie that took the vampire out of his crumbling castle and transported him to the seedier side of the modern day Las Vegas strip; and in doing so created one of the most endearingly reluctant monster hunters of all time, Carl Kolchak.

Originally airing as the ABC Movie of the Week on Tuesday, January 11th, 1972, The Night Stalker slayed the competition in the ratings, including CBS’s successful Hawaii Five-o/Cannon lineup. And I mean destroyed
See full article at DailyDead »

Dennis O’Neil: Pi’s

  • Comicmix
Now as I was young and easy and gentlemen still trod the Earth and politics still made sense (a little… sometimes) I held that private eye fiction was about righteous men who had the courage to be alone. I was, at the time, living by myself in a small Manhattan apartment and so I guess I was seeking identification with heroes (and maybe seeking an excuse for my isolation.) But I was, I now think, wrong.

Which fictional gumshoes did I have in mind? My two favorites were Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade and Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe and they were, indeed, solitary beings walking the mean streets seeking truth. And there were others sprinkled through the pop culture regions of pulp magazines, radio, B movies. (Comic books? Patience, please, we’ll get to them.)

If you’re looking for antecedents, cast a glance at the King Arthur stories.
See full article at Comicmix »

Luke Cage Showrunner Calls The Series A "Hip-Hop Western"

I've spent a great deal of time (perhaps too much) singing the praise of Marvel's Netflix shows. They're fun, well-paced, character-driven series with fantastic writing and great respect for the source material. Going from Daredevil to Jessica Jones, however, I had a concern that they'd feel too similar to one another -- that it would feel like each show is just a slight variation of the same show.

Luckily, that wasn't the case with those two, and if the trailers for Luke Cage are any indication, that won't be the case for that show either. In a recent interview with SciFiNow, Luke Cage showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker called the series a "hip-hop western." He embellished on this idea, but not before addressing direct comparisons to Daredevil and Jessica Jones:

Luke Cage has a different feel to Jessica Jones and Daredevil. Let’s talk about the elephant in the room
See full article at LRM Online »

Toronto Film Review: ‘City of Tiny Lights’

Toronto Film Review: ‘City of Tiny Lights’
Down-at-heel London-based private detective Tommy (Riz Ahmed) is investigating the disappearance of a Russian sex worker when he stumbles across a corpse. The body’s identity pulls him into a shadowy web of intrigue tangentially related to a tragedy that took place during his teenage years, and to which the narrative keeps flashing back. If the essential elements of “City of Tiny Lights” seem familiar, it’s because they are. Yet director Pete Travis’s film is distinguished by some transposition of noir tropes into cultural spaces not traditionally associated with the genre — from the London bar scene to a mosque — that keeps things from feeling too déjà vu.

On paper, this downbeat thriller is a surefire winner. Riz Ahmed, one of the best and fastest-rising of the current crop of young British actors (and probably about to go properly stellar in “Star Wars: Rogue One”) plays a Pi
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Explore the Making of Rian Johnson’s Debut Feature ‘Brick’ in 45-Minute Documentary

Before he traveled to intergalactic realms (or, more accurately, Ireland) for the next Star Wars installment, director Rian Johnson had modest beginnings, piecing together his quick-talking, incredibly slick directorial debut in Brick, which he shot in 2003 and which wasn’t released for three years. Cobbled together for a relatively small sum, all of which was contributed by friends and family after studios balked at the idea of a first-time director making something like this, Johnson’s first feature took the noir canvas — the coded language, the punished hero, the inter-connected network of characters — and cleverly fit it around a high school setting, or, as Johnson sates, “a weird teenage world, so that people don’t know what they’re watching” when combined with the noir styling. Starring the then-relatively-new Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Brendan, a loner with a wrought-iron will to uncover the truth, it weaves a devilishly deceptive and intriguing
See full article at The Film Stage »

Best Movies For A Friday Night

How many times have you come out of a theater after seeing a great movie and said,”oh I want to see that again!?” We all have our favorites that we return to time and time again. Friday night always seems the perfect time too. You’re relaxing after a week of school, activities and work and you unwind with a comfortable favorite film.

Wamg has our own personal favs. You’ll find blockbusters on our list…just because it invokes the fun memories of seeing it for the first time in the theater…with friends/family…then non-stop gabbing about wanting to see it again.

Looking for the perfect movie for a Friday Night? Check out our list below!

Meatballs Four words – “It Just Doesn’t Matter!”

The Burbs Hilarious cast made up suburbanites Tom Hanks, Rick Ducummon, Bruce Dern and Carrie Fisher, Joe Dante’s comedy about the unusual neighbors next door (Yes,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

8 powerfully effective voice-overs in modern movies

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Sometimes funny, often poignant, narration can be hugely effective when deployed successfully. Ryan picks a few great examples...

“God help you if you use voice-over in your work my friends! God help you. That’s flaccid, sloppy writing. Any idiot can use narration to explain the thoughts of a character.”

So says screenwriting coach Robert McKee in Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman’s 2002 film, Adaptation. Well, not the real screenwriting coach Robert Mckee, but the one played in superbly aggressive style by actor Brian Cox, who stomps about on stage at a writing seminar like an angry bull. Brilliantly, McKee’s condemnation of voice-overs interrupts the interior thoughts, as narrated by Nicolas Cage’s fictionalised version of Charlie Kaufman - a terminally anxious screenwriter with an Everest-sized case of writer’s block.

It’s an example of the quirky, hall-of-mirrors kind of humour that courses through Adaptation,
See full article at Den of Geek »
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