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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1991

14 items from 2016


Mother's Day review – Jennifer Aniston and Julia Roberts in skin-crawlingly smug romcom

9 June 2016 2:45 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

With bland emotional manipulation, Garry Marshall’s follow-up to Valentine’s Day is as funny as a fire in an asbestos factory neighbouring a children’s hospital

“Hey! What are you doing for Mother’s Day?” says no normal human being ever. But they do in this film, the third in an escalatingly creepy series of sentimental “day”-themed ensemble romcoms from director Garry Marshall, following Valentine’s Day and New Year’s Eve. The next in the series could be Hitler’s Birthday with Jennifer Aniston as Eva Braun, Kate Hudson as Leni Riefenstahl and Julia Roberts as Rommel. It couldn’t be as offensive and reactionary as this skin-crawlingly smug film set in upscale Atlanta, Georgia: the white part of town, evidently, with one south Asian guy permitted to have a halfway important speaking role, on condition that he is the subject of racist gags and that his »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Carice van Houten: ‘I feel like my back is straightening when I become Melisandre’

5 June 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The Game of Thrones star on playing Nazi film director Leni Riefenstahl, getting into character and male nudity

Actor and singer Carice van Houten was born in the Netherlands in 1976. Acclaimed in her own country, where she has won a number of Golden Calf awards, she attracted international attention with her role in Paul Verhoeven’s 2006 film Black Book. Her English-language films include Valkyrie (2008), Repo Men and Black Death (both 2010). Since 2011, she has portrayed Melisandre in Game of Thrones. Now van Houten stars as Nazi film-maker and propagandist Leni Riefenstahl in a new film, Race, about African American athlete Jesse Owens and his impact on the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

What kind of research did you do into Leni Riefenstahl?

I watched a lot of her films, footage, read a lot about her. The more I knew about her the more I wished we could make a whole movie about her alone. »

- Kathryn Bromwich

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Carice van Houten: ‘I feel like my back is straightening when I become Melisandre’

5 June 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Game of Thrones star on playing Nazi film director Leni Riefenstahl, getting into character and male nudity

Actor and singer Carice van Houten was born in the Netherlands in 1976. Acclaimed in her own country, where she has won a number of Golden Calf awards, she attracted international attention with her role in Paul Verhoeven’s 2006 film Black Book. Her English-language films include Valkyrie (2008), Repo Men and Black Death (both 2010). Since 2011, she has portrayed Melisandre in Game of Thrones. Now van Houten stars as Nazi film-maker and propagandist Leni Riefenstahl in a new film, Race, about African American athlete Jesse Owens and his impact on the 1936 Olympics in Berlin.

What kind of research did you do into Leni Riefenstahl?

I watched a lot of her films, footage, read a lot about her. The more I knew about her the more I wished we could make a whole movie about her alone. »

- Kathryn Bromwich

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Race review – reverential middle-of-the-pack drama

2 June 2016 8:14 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Stephan James’s committed turn as Jesse Owens stops this grandstanding film about the 1936 Olympics from descending into cheesiness

More marathon than sprint, Stephen Hopkins’ period biopic affords the Jesse Owens story – one of the greatest eff-yous ever recorded in competitive sport – a reverential, middle-of-the-pack treatment: stumbling exposition, grandstanding performers, a thousand yards of rousing speeches and music cues. It’s regrettably typical that Stephan James’s Owens is given a caucasian interlocutor in coach Larry Snyder (Jason Sudeikis, reining in the smirks), and that his personal struggles are partially obscured by the negotiations of diplomat Jeremy Irons with a chilly Goebbels (Barnaby Metschurat) and saucy Leni Riefenstahl (Carice van Houten). Still, it raises its game – as drama, spectacle and camp – the closer it gets to the Olympic stadium, where Hitler awaits, muttering darkly in the stands like a Voldemort in epaulettes. That it remains broadly watchable owes much to James’s lean, »

- Mike McCahill

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Race (2016) – The Review

18 February 2016 9:57 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Hollywood knows that one genre is almost certain to get the audience’s blood pumping and pulse racing: the sports story. Creed certainly proved that a few months ago (you’d think audiences were watching a real live boxing match, judging from the all the cheering at the multiplex). Couple that on-screen excitement with a dramatic true story, and you’ve hopefully got a critical and box office hit. And while professional sports may be tainted and tarnished thanks to bad behavior and big bucks, the amateur athletes still have a purity and nobility about them. There have been plenty of college (We Are Marshall), high school (Hoosiers), and even grade school (The Bad News Bears) team tales, but for individual triumphs, the four-year spectacle, the Olympics, abound in stories of glory and drama. Well 2016 just so happens to be an olympic year, so the studios are launching the first »

- Jim Batts

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[Review] Race

18 February 2016 12:19 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Stephen HopkinsRace focuses on Jesse Owens (Selma’s Stephan James), a legendary African-American runner who won four gold medals in the 1936 Berlin Olympics, but never quite received the acclaim he deserved, thanks to virulent racism and a country that only pays attention to you when you’re winning. To Race’s credit, it tries to express these complicated circumstances through an adjacent look at the behind-the-scenes process of America deciding whether to participate in the Olympics at all, and subsequently Owens’ own crisis of faith about whether to attend, but it lacks a coherent perspective to link together all these disparate parts.

From the beginning, Owens is the consummate underdog on the way to success, literally weaving in and out of an impoverished Cleveland in 1933, to say bye to his family before heading off to college. The script is full of telegraphing platitudes like Owens telling his terminally unemployed »

- Michael Snydel

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Film Review: ‘Race’

18 February 2016 10:03 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Though the film is due out in theaters this weekend, it’ll be a couple of years before “Race” fully arrives in its most natural habitat: resource-starved high school history classrooms. Which is not necessarily a bad thing. Competently recounting a fairly can’t-miss historical episode — Jesse Owens’ Nazi-defying triumph at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin — and featuring a lead actor (Stephan James) who impresses in spite of a strangely underdeveloped lead role, Stephen Hopkins’ film offers a safe, middlebrow slice of history that beats a snoozy lecture any day. Making a few admirable attempts to complicate what could have been a standard-issue inspirational sports narrative, “Race” is better than it has to be, but not by too much, and it should be expected to compete, but not medal, at the box office.

Thankfully avoiding a cradle-to-grave summation of Owens’ life, “Race” fills in all the most pertinent biographical details »

- Andrew Barker

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‘Race’: Film Review

18 February 2016 9:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

A charged moment in world history, Jesse Owens’ quadruple-gold performance at the 1936 Berlin Olympics is packed with symbolism ready-made for the movies. Leni Riefenstahl mined the stunning visual poetry of it for her landmark documentary Olympia. She did so in a film that otherwise celebrated Aryan supremacy, a Third Reich doctrine that the black American athlete’s triumph left in the dust. Race, in which Riefenstahl is a key supporting character, touches on such paradoxes, pointedly but politely. This portrait of the track-and-field immortal — first off the starting block among several planned Owens biopics, and

read more

»

- Sheri Linden

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Race Tells The Incredible True Story of The First Worldwide Superstar, Jesse Owens

17 February 2016 2:23 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

By Gary Salem

Opening in theaters nationwide this Friday, February 19th, is the new film, Race.

Based on the incredible true story of Jesse Owens, the legendary athletic superstar whose quest to become the greatest track and field athlete in history thrusts him onto the world stage of the 1936 Olympics, where he faces off against Adolf Hitler’s vision of Aryan supremacy. Race is an enthralling film about courage, determination, tolerance, and friendship, and an inspiring drama about one man’s fight to become an Olympic legend.

Race tracks the journey of James Cleveland “Jesse” Owens (portrayed by Stephan James of Selma). As a student and athlete in Depression-era America, Jesse bears the weight of family expectations, racial tension at his college Ohio State University, and his own high standards for competition.

At Ohio State University, Jesse finds a savvy coach and stalwart friend in Larry Snyder (Jason Sudeikis) – who »

- Movie Geeks

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NBC to Air Jesse Owens Documentary on Sunday

11 February 2016 3:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

NBC Sports continues its efforts at releasing documentaries with the debut of “More Than Gold: Jesse Owens and the 1936 Berlin Olympics.” The one-hour documentary will debut Sunday, February 14, at 12:30 p.m. on NBC.

The program will examine Jesse Owens’ historic performance at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany. Actor Morgan Freeman does the narration.

“More Than Gold” features interviews with three members of the U.S. team who competed in the 1936 Olympics: Adolph Kiefer (Gold Medalist, 100-Meter Backstroke); Iris Cummings Critchell (200-Meter Breaststroke); and John Lysak (Doubles Canoe), as well as 1948 U.S. Olympic team member Herbert Douglas (Bronze Medalist, Long Jump).  The film also features Owens’ daughters Beverly Owens Prather, Marlene Owens Rankin and Gloria Owens Hemphill.

The documentary also features archival footage from the 1936 Berlin Games, including restored elements from “Olympia,” the official film of the 1936 Olympics by German director Leni Riefenstahl.

“More Than Gold” could serve »

- Variety Staff

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13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi movie review: American mercenary

29 January 2016 7:43 AM, PST | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

Michael Bay propagandizes for a right-wing idea of “true America,” seething with disdain for anyone who isn’t a former elite soldier turned mercenary. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): not a Michael Bay fan

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

This purportedly true account of the 2012 “Battle of Benghazi” opens with American military contractors Jack Silva (John Krasinski: The Wind Rises, Monsters University), who has just arrived in town, and his old buddy Tyrone “Rone” Woods (James Badge Dale: The Walk, Parkland) bluffing their way past a roadblock by armed Libyans. It doesn’t matter what side the Libyans are on; in the chaos that erupted after Gaddafi’s death: the point is that they are Libyans — suspiciously lawless violent folk, that is, who cannot even get their own nation under control — and not Americans. »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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Hitler’s Children

12 January 2016 10:22 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Rko's morale-building wartime thriller adds an element of sexual perversion to its story of Nazi crimes against children, thus creating one of the studio's all-time biggest hits. Bonita Granville is the victim Tim Holt her Nazi-youth heartthrob, and Otto Kruger provides the perverted sneers. Hitler's Children DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1943 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 82 min. / Street Date December 1, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Tim Holt, Bonita Granville, Kent Smith, Otto Kruger, H.B. Warner, Lloyd Corrigan, Erford Gage, Hans Conried, Gavin Muir, Nancy Gates, Egon Brecher, Peter van Eyck, Edward Van Sloan. Cinematography Russell Metty Film Editor Joseph Noriega Original Music Roy Webb Written by Emmet Lavery from the book Education for Death by Gregor Ziemer Produced by Edward A. Golden Directed by Edward Dmytryk

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Perhaps the most popular anti-Nazi info-propaganda thriller of the war, Hitler's Children is a very well made shocker that »

- Glenn Erickson

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Aiming for the top by Anne-Katrin Titze

6 January 2016 11:14 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Jimmy Chin on Mount Meru Photo: Renan Ozturk

In Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin's Oscar shortlisted Best Documentary Film nominee Meru, three of the world’s most accomplished mountain climbers, Conrad Anker, Renan Ozturk and Chin himself, attempt to conquer nature, outward and inward, to reach the Shark’s Fin on Mount Meru, the heretofore impossible peak in the Himalayas. The footage is breathtaking, the obstacles seem insurmountable, the trust and friendship between them has to be complete and you will find yourself cheering them on.

Jimmy Chin: "I owe so much to Conrad …" Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Arnold Fanck films with Luis Trenker and Leni Riefenstahl The Holy Mountain (Der Heilige Berg) and The Great Leap (Der Grosse Sprung) and Storm Over Mont Blanc (Stürme Über Dem Mont Blanc) with Riefenstahl and Sepp Rist came to mind as I spoke with Jimmy Chin. He expressed his love of the ocean, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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New on Video: ‘Triumph of the Will’

3 January 2016 1:02 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Triumph of the Will

Written by Leni Riefenstahl, Walter Ruttmann, Eberhard Taubert

Directed by Leni Riefenstahl

Germany, 1935

It is never easy to look at Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will as anything other than what Dr. Anthony Santoro quite rightly calls a “supreme propaganda film.” As that, it is nearly unparalleled in the dubious annals of film history. Contributing to its difficulty in terms of analysis, however, is the fact that it is, at the same time, more than simply a notorious document of evil in bloom. For all the troublesome features that recurrently arise through the course of this film—the domineering presence of Adolf Hitler being just one obvious example—this is one remarkably well-crafted motion picture. Its status as the ultimate work of cinematic propaganda is, indeed, a direct result of just how superbly powerful, sadly persuasive, and expertly realized the documentary is, for better or worse. »

- Jeremy Carr

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1991

14 items from 2016


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