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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

18 items from 2014


The 20 most exciting cinematographers working today

9 December 2014 2:06 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I believe that we are very quietly going through a golden age of cinematography. Simple as that. I spend more time talking to DPs than just about anything else in my business, though, mostly because they have the best stories and engage, for me, in the most fulfilling ways. So maybe I have a touch of bias. But when I look out across the industry, I'm gobsmacked by the talent on display, worthy heirs to a kingdom collectively forged by the titans: Shamroy, Surtees, Hall, Milner, Toland, Stradling, Storaro, Willis, Ruttenberg, etc. So it occurred to me: Why not showcase the most exciting names out there today? Subjective, of course, and I kept the list pretty big to be fairly inclusive. But I had no trouble filling it out, either. There are so many cinematographers out there who seem to represent the promise of exciting, bold and innovative cinema in the years to come. »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Tarantino Retiring After Three More Films?

11 November 2014 7:39 AM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Filmmaker Quentin Tarantino recently spoke about his upcoming western ensemble piece "The Hateful Eight" at the American Film Market and revealed that he plans on retiring once he completes his tenth film. 'Hateful' is his eighth which means there may only be three more Tarantino-helmed films on the way.

This isn't the first time he's suggested this plan, he made comments two years ago which suggested the same thing. Here's his recent comments (via Deadline):

"I don't believe you should stay on stage until people are begging you to get off. I like the idea of leaving them wanting a bit more. I do think directing is a young man's game and I like the idea of an umbilical cord connection from my first to my last movie.

I'm not trying to ridicule anyone who thinks differently, but I want to go out while I'm still hard... I like »

- Garth Franklin

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Quentin Tarantino Will Retire After Directing 10 Movies

10 November 2014 6:04 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Now that the full cast is confirmed for director Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, with shooting scheduled to begin early next year, the filmmaker has revealed new details about the revenge Western at the American Film Market. There, he also echoed statements he made back in November of 2012, reiterating that he plans on retiring after making 10 movies, with the upcoming The Hateful Eight his eighth feature film to date.

Here's what he had to say about wanting to retire after 10 movies, although he did leave the door open for that plan to change down the road.

"I don't believe you should stay on stage until people are begging you to get off. I like the idea of leaving them wanting a bit more. I do think directing is a young man's game and I like the idea of an umbilical cord connection from my first to my last movie. »

- MovieWeb

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Tech Support: 'Birdman,' 'Unbroken' and 'Interstellar' set the mood for Best Cinematography

23 October 2014 1:01 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Commentators have noted that this year's Best Actor race is stacked with way more than five outstanding candidates. And they are right. But compared to Best Cinematography, Best Actor is positively paper thin. As usual, an embarrassment of riches is present in this category, which awards a film's director of photography (Dp). The cinematography branch is partial to gorgeous looking films, black-and-white films and war films. After years of resisting digital photography, the branch has also embraced 3D work this decade. Being a Best Picture nominee can also help immensely, but so can being a foreign-language film; the branch has an international eye like few others. In any particular year, most of the nominees tend to be returning contenders. Moreover, many first-time nominees (such as Philippe Le Sourde and Phedon Papamichael last year) tend to be veterans awaiting their first nomination. Having said that, there hasn't been a year with »

- Gerard Kennedy

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Salvador | Blu-ray Review

14 October 2014 7:15 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

It’s been a long time since Oliver Stone made anything with as much punchy political grit as Salvador. As the first of two films (the other being Platoon) produced by John Daly (and released mind-bogglingly within months of each other in the spring of 1986) that reckoned with war and all of its cultivated cruelty, its recklessness and the underlying romanticism being ravaged from within. Stone’s film took up the, at that time, still active El Salvadoran peasant revolution and the Us funded murder and suppression of such an uprising, as its volatile subject, all through the eyes of a true-to-life conniving Hunter S. Thompson-esque photo journalist named Richard Boyle, who co-wrote the screenplay along with Stone and who’s on the ground experiences served as inspiration for the film. An Academy Award nominee for Best Original Screenplay and Best Actor, raw in its depiction of the ugliness »

- Jordan M. Smith

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With 'American Gods' Dead At HBO, What's The Status Of Other Neil Gaiman Adaptations?

16 June 2014 10:42 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Though they're, at the most, halfway through the series, HBO is already starting to look for potential successors to "Game of Thrones," which recently became the biggest hit in the network's history. With "True Blood" wrapping up this year, they're very much in the market for another fantasy/sci-fi-type show: Damon Lindelof's "The Leftovers" will debut in a few weeks, and only a week or two back, it was revealed that Darren Aronofsky is developing an adaptation of Margaret Atwood's "MaddAddam" trilogy. One show that won't be joining them, sadly, is an adaptation of "American Gods," Neil Gaiman's bestseller about old and new deities battling for control in the U.S. heartland. It was announced a few years ago that the network was planning a series adaptation of the book, with Scorsese and Tarantino DoP Robert Richardson writing and directing, and Tom Hanks producing, but the script never came together, »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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With 'American Gods' Dead At HBO, What's The Status Of Other Neil Gaiman Adaptations?

16 June 2014 10:42 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Though they're, at the most, halfway through the series, HBO is already starting to look for potential successors to "Game of Thrones," which recently became the biggest hit in the network's history. With "True Blood" wrapping up this year, they're very much in the market for another fantasy/sci-fi-type show: Damon Lindelof's "The Leftovers" will debut in a few weeks, and only a week or two back, it was revealed that Darren Aronofsky is developing an adaptation of Margaret Atwood's "MaddAddam" trilogy. One show that won't be joining them, sadly, is an adaptation of "American Gods," Neil Gaiman's bestseller about old and new deities battling for control in the U.S. heartland. It was announced a few years ago that the network was planning a series adaptation of the book, with Scorsese and Tarantino DoP Robert Richardson writing and directing, and Tom Hanks producing, but the script never came together, »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Meet the 2014 Tribeca Filmmakers #8: Christopher Denham Made a Horror But He Can't Stand the Sight of Blood

9 April 2014 7:57 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Not a lot of people can stand the sight of blood, but it's not very common to find a horror filmmaker who passes out at the sight of it. Director Christopher Denham, however, has found a way to get around his discomfort with gore in his terrifying film "Preservation," which takes the scary, secluded woods setting and gives it new meaning. Tell us about yourself. I'm from Chicago. I live in NYC (occasionally La). I'm lucky enough to say my day job is acting. I cut my teeth as a theater actor and playwright in New York. Whatever I know (or claim to know) about directing I learned through acting. Through osmosis. Between takes, I would stick around set and see how Scorsese talks to Bob Richardson. I would see how he talks to actors. How he collaborates. I was basically taking notes, hoping something would rub off somehow.  What »

- Ziyad Saadi

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Team Top Ten: The Greatest Working Cinematographers

5 April 2014 2:04 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Amir here, to welcome you back to Team Top Ten, our monthly poll by all of the website’s contributors. For our first episode in 2014, we are looking at The Greatest Working Cinematographers in the (international) film industry. As long time readers of The Film Experience are surely aware, the visual language of cinema is something Nathaniel and the rest of us are very fond of discussing. Films and filmmakers that have a dash of style and understand cinema as a visual medium always get bonus points around these parts. We celebrate great works in cinematography on a weekly basis in Hit Me With Your Best Shot, but it was time to give the people behind the camera their due.

 

More than 50 cinematographers from all across the world received votes. If the final, somewhat American-centric, list doesn’t quite reflect that, chalk it up to the natural process of consensus voting. »

- Amir S.

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Video Tribute to 21st Century Cinematographers

2 April 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

Here's a fantastic video montage that pays tribute to the art of modern cinematography. There are a lot of great things being done with cinematography these days, and movies are just looking more and more amazing. The video is called Ode to (21st Century) Cinematographers, it was created by Erick Lee, and here's a note that came along with it. 

This is a compilation of Some of my favorite shots from numerous cinematographers from around the world, roughly during the past decade. Due to not only wanting to keep a consistent look, but to also respect the cinematographers' work by not re-cropping 16x9 media, I only used movies that were shot around a 2.40:1 aspect ratio. As you can imagine, this not only limited what I was able to use, but also prevented me from using some of my favorite display of cinematography. Among those include "Children of Men" by Emmanuel Lubezki, »

- Joey Paur

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Watch: Beautiful Montage Pays Tribute to Modern Cinematographers

1 April 2014 8:28 AM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

We've featured plenty of tributes to some of the great directors working in film today, including the likes of Tim Burton and Christopher Nolan, but what about the cinematographers who make their films look absolutely gorgeous? Well, editor Erick Lee took it upon himself to pay tribute to some of the great directors of photography of the 21st century, including Emmanuel Lubezki (Gravity, Children of Men), Roger Deakins (Skyfall, True Grit), Robert Richardson (Django Unchained, Inglourious Basterds), Matthew Libatique (Black Swan) and much more. As you would expect, it's a beautiful video with spectacular shots. Here's an Ode to (21st Century) Cinematographers made by Erick Lee (found via The Playlist): Now before anyone starts complaining about any exclusions (see the full list of all included movies and cinematographers right here), Lee explains that "this is a compilation of some of my favorite shots from numerous cinematographers from around the world, »

- Ethan Anderton

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Watch: 6-Minute Ode To 21st Century Cinematographers

1 April 2014 7:28 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

We’re nearly fifteen years into the 21st century and despite the frequent predictions of the implosion of cinema, the industry and medium is still going strong. While much has been made recently about the end of celluloid, a great deal of the best cinematic work in the past decade has been captured photochemically in addition to digitally as a new video on Vimeo can attest. Edited by Erick Lee, this roughly six-minute long video pays tribute to some the best cinematographers working today. In an attempt to maintain uniformity throughout the video as well as not wishing to crop any of the images, Lee culled shots from films with an aspect ratio of 2.40:1 by luminaries that include Christopher Doyle, Pung-Leung Kwan, S. Ravi Varman,Frank Giebe, John Toll, Wally Pfister, Roger Deakins, Anthony Dod Mantle, Paul Cameron, Emmanuel Lubezki, J. Michael Muro, Robert Richardson, Florian Ballhaus,John R., »

- Cain Rodriguez

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Watch: Visually Arresting Ode to 21st Century Cinematographers

1 April 2014 6:47 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Editor Erick Lee has thrown together a stunning compilation of shots from a host of international cinematographers. The theme tying them together? All of the shots were created in the past ten years. Unfortunately, Erick wasn't able to include some of his favorites. Because he wanted to respect the cinematographers' work by not re-cropping 16x9 media, he could only include movies that were shot around a 2.40:1 aspect ratio. As a result, scenes from "Children of Men" by Emmanuel Lubezki, "Prisoners" by Roger Deakins, "Hugo" by Robert Richardson, and "Only God Forgives" by Larry Smith, didn't make it into the cut. Still though, it's a good century to be watching movies. How many do you recognize? »

- Luke Slattery

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Visual Effects Films and Cinematography: A Match Made on a Computer?

27 February 2014 8:03 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Terence Johnson

Managing Editor

It’s common knowledge that while the Oscar often tout rewarding the best in film, that the notion of what’s best is entirely subjective, depending on the voter. So when trying to make informed Oscar decisions, one has to look past subjective thoughts and search for the trends. One of the major trends that has been appearing has been the success of films with heavy visual effects or 3D in the cinematography category. With Emmanuel Lubezki all but on stage to accept the Oscar in cinematography, it was worth taking a look at the category’s evolution.

There have always been epic films or movies that have had some visual effects that have competed in, and won cinematography Oscars. Yet after Titanic won 11 Oscars, including Cinematography, there seems to have been a wave of films that have relied on visual effects to tell their tale succeeding in this category. »

- Terence Johnson

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Martin Scorsese looks at the changing face of Oscar season over four decades

25 February 2014 7:20 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

For years, the Oscars and Martin Scorsese just didn't seem to jibe. His films didn't resonate with that crowd. Maybe it was because he was an outsider. Maybe it was because he didn't trade in the breed of films that typically found footing with the Academy. Whatever the case, it became, for decades, a consistent note: How does Martin Scorsese not have an Oscar? Things began to change nearly three decades into his career. Until 2002, a Scorsese film registering with the group was not nearly the consistent occurrence it is today. Yet since "Gangs of New York," four of his last five films Have received Best Picture nominations and he finds himself a perennial fixture on the Oscar circuit, a circuit he has seen change drastically over the course of his career. With Oscar voting drawing to a close, I spoke with Scorsese recently about that very phenomenon, how zealous »

- Kristopher Tapley

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'Anna Karenina' In One

16 January 2014 3:32 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

I wasn't a big fan of Joe Wright's Anna Karenina, but within Wright's films there are always things to enjoy and most often that includes his tracking shots and just today I came across this behind the scenes look at the tracking shot in Anna Karenina uploaded by the film's camera operator, Peter Robertson. Most often we can only marvel at the shot itself, but this allows you to not only hear the direction as the sequence is being performed, but all the pieces being moved in and out of place to execute it. This look reminds me a lot of the behind the scenes look we got at how Martin Scorsese and Robert Richardson pulled off a lengthy Steadicam shot in Hugo, which I have also included below. Additionally, you can get an alternate angle look at the Anna Karenina shot right here, but unfortunately I couldn't find the finished scene online anywhere. »

- Brad Brevet

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A Story Lately Told: Coming of Age in Ireland, London and New York by Anjelica Huston – review

16 January 2014 2:14 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Macho and egotistical John Huston dominates Anjelica's vividly written, fascinating memoir

Anjelica Huston's first starring screen role – directed by her father John – was in 1969's A Walk with Love and Death. The only review she quotes in her memoir is John Simon's: "There is a perfectly blank, supremely inept performance by Huston's daughter Anjelica, who has the face of an exhausted gnu, the voice of an unstrung tennis racket, and a figure of no discernible shape."

No preening luvvie, this one. And pace the crass Mr Simon (reviewing her looks rather than her acting) we know Huston is, or became, a good actor. Her performance in The Witches gave my little sister nightmares not for weeks, but years. It turns out that she can also really write. What's more, she has a story to tell.

Huston grew up in an atmosphere of immense privilege and occasional emotional deprivation. This involving memoir falls, »

- Sam Leith

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BAFTA And The American Society Of Cinematographers Announce Their Nominations

8 January 2014 11:15 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Early this morning saw the announcement of the nominations for the BAFTA (British Academy of Film and Television Arts) awards for 2013. For the most part, they look like all of the other guild nominations we’ve seen over the past month or so (including all five director nominees who were just nominated for the DGA’s top award), but there are a few interesting differences to take note of.

First off, Philomena has a much stronger presence here, but given that it is a British film, it’s hardly surprising. You may also notice a lot of love for Behind the Candelabra, a film that was only shown on TV in the States, making it ineligible for theatrical awards.

However, aside from that, just about all the major players are here. Gravity leads the pack with 11 nominations, including Best Film, Outstanding British Film, Best Director, and Best Actress. 12 Years a »

- Jeff Beck

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

18 items from 2014


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