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The Man Who Fell to Earth

This (British) trailer goes out of its way to oversell the debuting David Bowie (the best-cast alien since Michael Rennie in Day The Earth Stood Still), but Nic Roeg and Paul Mayersberg’s adaptation of Walter Tevis’ novel faced a rocky reception when producer Paramount Pictures refused to distribute it after its first screening. Picked up by arthouse indie Cinema V, it was brutally cut for its initial Us release but managed to find cult status anyway. It’s since been restored and is a must-see; one of the most intelligent science fiction films ever released.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "Cyborg 2087" (1966) Starring Michael Rennie; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

Though often dismissed as a low-budget “Made for TV” feature, director Franklin Adreon’s Cyborg 2087 enjoyed a brief theatrical run prior to its debut on broadcast television in March of 1968. In April of 1967 the film was packaged alongside such similarly low-budgeted, independent features as Death Curse of Tartu, Sting of Death, and even a second Adreon “time travel” themed film, Dimension 5. Though this somewhat lackluster film seemed destined for relegation to the late-night drive-in horror movie circuit, Cyborg 2087 nonetheless displayed some small measure of staying power. That same summer, Adreon’s film was still making the rounds of the secondary flea-pit theater circuit, sometimes serving as the under bill to Sidney J. Furie’s contemporary political thriller The Naked Runner featuring Frank Sinatra.

Though he had worked on serials and a handful of feature films in the early stages of his career, director Adreon was laboring
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Third Man Screens May 3rd at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“Don’t be so gloomy. After all it’s not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love – they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock!”

The Third Man screens Wednesday May 3rd at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as part of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Roger Ebert called Harry Lime, the character played by Orson Welles in the 1949 classic The Third Man, his favorite screen villain of all time. Fittingly, he gets one of the great movie character introductions — an unforgettable one involving a doorway, a cat, and a sudden beam of light.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Pimpernel’ Smith

How could England have won the war without him? Horatio Smith sneaks about in Nazi Germany, liberating concentration camp inmates right under the noses of the Gestapo. Leslie Howard directed and stars in this wartime escapist spy thriller, as a witty professor too passive to be suspected as the mystery spy.

‘Pimpernel’ Smith

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 121 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring Leslie Howard, Francis L. Sullivan, Mary Morris, Allan Jeayes, Peter Gawthorne, Hugh McDermott, David Tomlinson, Raymond Huntley, Sebastian Cabot, Irene Handl, Ronald Howard, Michael Rennie.

Cinematography Mutz Greenbaum

Camera Operators Guy Green, Jack Hildyard

Film Editor Douglas Myers

Original Music John Greenwood

Written by Anatole de Grunwald, Roland Pertwee, A.G. Macdonell, Wolfgang Wilhelm based on a character by Baroness Emmuska Orczy

Produced by Leslie Howard, Harold Huth

Directed by Leslie Howard

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I like movies
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Arrival: a must-see film in a year of uncertainty

Ryan Lambie Nov 14, 2016

As well as a great sci-fi thriller, Arrival is a film that offers a message of hope in a year of division and uncertainty, Ryan writes...

Nb: The following contains mild spoilers for Arrival.

It's no coincidence that the wave of science fiction films that emerged in the 1950s rode on a tide of post-war anxiety. The advent of the atom bomb, the Cold War, renewed fears of Communist incursion: these were just some of the fears that emerged as World War II shuddered to a close. And as the 40s tipped over into the 50s, those fears began to play out in movies: giant atomic monsters tore apart cities in the Us and Japan. Alien invaders arrived in their saucers, raining down great waves of death and destruction. Other invasions were more insidious: the aliens looked like us, lived among us, even controlled us from within.
See full article at Den of Geek »

16mm Double Feature Night July 5th – Day The Earth Stood Still and Richard Pryor Live On The Sunset Strip

Join us for some old-school 16mm Movie Madness! – It’s our monthly 16Mm Double Feature Night at The Way Out Club (2525 Jefferson Avenue in St. Louis)! Join Tom Stockman and Roger from “Roger’s Reels’ for a double feature of two complete films projected on 16mm film. The show is Tuesday July 5th and starts at 8pm. Admission is Free though we will be setting out a jar to take donations for the National Children’s Cancer Society.

“Klaatu barada nikto!”

First up is: The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951)

The sci-fi parable The Day The Earth Stood Still starring Oscar winner Patricia Neal tells the story of Klaatu, a visitor from another world (played by Michael Rennie) with his allmighty robot Gor who land unexpectedly at the White House to stop people from expanding the human violence beyond frontiers of the planet Earth. When he sees that he cannot
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sci-fi Weekend, Ahrya Fine Art, Los Angeles, April 15-17

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

The Ahrya Fine Arts Theater in Los Angeles will be presenting a fun-filled weekend of six science fiction classics from Friday, April 15th to Sunday, April 17th. Several cast members from the films are scheduled to appear in person at respective screenings, so read on for more information:

From the press release:

Anniversary Classics Sci-Fi Weekend

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: www.laemmle.com/ac.

Re-visit the Golden Age of the Science Fiction Film as Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series presents Sci-fi Weekend, a festival of six classic films April 15-17 at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Beverly Hills.

It was dawn of the Atomic Age and the Cold War, as Communist and nuclear war paranoia swept onto the nation’s movie screens to both terrify and entertain the American public. All the favorite icons are here: Robby the Robot from Forbidden Planet,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oberon Later Years: From Empress to Duchess, Shah of Iran Mexican House Connection

Merle Oberon films: From empress to duchess in 'Hotel.' Merle Oberon films: From starring to supporting roles Turner Classic Movies' Merle Oberon month comes to an end tonight, March 25, '16, with six movies: Désirée, Hotel, Deep in My Heart, Affectionately Yours, Berlin Express, and Night Song. Oberon's presence alone would have sufficed to make them all worth a look, but they have other qualities to recommend them as well. 'Désirée': First supporting role in two decades Directed by Henry Koster, best remembered for his Deanna Durbin musicals and the 1947 fantasy comedy The Bishop's Wife, Désirée (1954) is a sumptuous production that, thanks to its big-name cast, became a major box office hit upon its release. Marlon Brando is laughably miscast as Napoleon Bonaparte, while Jean Simmons plays the title role, the Corsican Conqueror's one-time fiancée Désirée Clary (later Queen of Sweden and Norway). In a supporting role – her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Watch: How 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' Became One of the Most Influential Sci-Fi Movies in History

Watch: How 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' Became One of the Most Influential Sci-Fi Movies in History
Elsewhere on Trailers from Hell, Joe Dante describes Jack Arnold’s 1958 "The Space Children" as that rare example of a "pacifist" sci-fi thriller. Robert Wise’s 1951 "The Day the Earth Stood Still" could qualify as the granddaddy of that genre were it not for its ambivalent message, which is, loosely translated, "Be peaceful or we’ll blow you out of the solar system." Regardless, Klattu, the kinder, gentler alien who visits Earth carrying a stern warning from space, embodies the humanism at the center of Edmund North’s screenplay. An intelligent and, at times, lightly satirical look at '50s paranoia, mixed with high-caliber sci-fi thrills—personified by Klattu's interstellar bodyguard, the ominous robot Gort—Wise’s film continues to make a lasting impression on all who see it. Michael Rennie plays Klattu and the thrilling theremin-powered score is by Bernard Herrmann.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Day the Earth Stood Still

Elsewhere on Tfh, Joe Dante describes Jack Arnold’s 1958 The Space Children as that rare example of a “pacifist” sci-fi thriller. Robert Wise’s 1951 The Day the Earth Stood Still could qualify as the granddaddy of that genre were it not for its ambivalent message which is, loosely translated, “Be peaceful or we’ll blow you out of the solar system”. Regardless, Klattu, the kinder, gentler alien who visits earth carrying a stern warning from space, embodies the humanism at the center of Edmund North’s screenplay. An intelligent and, at times, lightly satirical look at 50s paranoia mixed with high-caliber sci-fi thrills (personified by Klattu’s interstellar bodyguard, the ominous robot Gort), Wise’s film continues to make a lasting impression on all who see it. Michael Rennie plays Klattu and the thrilling theremin-powered score is by Bernard Herrmann.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

19 Oscar-worthy sci-fi movie performances

A genre constantly overlooked at awards ceremonies, sci-fi cinema is full of stunning performances - like these...

Should we care whether the Academy likes science fiction or not? Does it matter that the genre and its best performances are regularly overlooked by most mainstream awards bodies? Probably not. But consider this: cinema is by now a long-established artform. Movies chart all aspects of the human condition: birth, death, happiness, sadness, ennui, fear, elation, empathy.

The best sci-fi movies arguably achieve the same thing. Where else is the sense of mystery and triumphant discovery felt more keenly than in, say, Solaris? What other genre could explore the nature of addiction with the same humour and pathos as A Scanner Darkly? Could the themes of ageing and disease in The Fly be transposed to a realistic drama and still be as thrilling, bizarre and tragic?

It’s still the case that science
See full article at Den of Geek »

Neal Doesn't Stand Still as Earth Stops, Fascism Rises: Oscar Winner Who Suffered Massive Stroke Is TCM's Star

Patricia Neal ca. 1950. Patricia Neal movies: 'The Day the Earth Stood Still,' 'A Face in the Crowd' Back in 1949, few would have predicted that Gary Cooper's leading lady in King Vidor's The Fountainhead would go on to win a Best Actress Academy Award 15 years later. Patricia Neal was one of those performers – e.g., Jean Arthur, Anne Bancroft – whose film career didn't start out all that well, but who, by way of Broadway, managed to both revive and magnify their Hollywood stardom. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” series, Turner Classic Movies is dedicating Sunday, Aug. 16, '15, to Patricia Neal. This evening, TCM is showing three of her best-known films, in addition to one TCM premiere and an unusual latter-day entry. 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' Robert Wise was hardly a genre director. A former editor (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Why the Midnight Madness of 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show' Still Matters 40 Years Later

Why the Midnight Madness of 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show' Still Matters 40 Years Later
Read More: 9 Cult Films That Deserve a Television Prequel Series "Michael Rennie was ill / The day the Earth stood still / But he told us where we stand. / And Flash Gordon was there / In silver underwear, / Claude Rains was the Invisible Man. / Then something went wrong / For Fay Wray and King Kong, / They got caught in a celluloid jam. / Then at a deadly pace, / It came from Outer Space, / And this is how the message ran..." The opening lines to "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" reference American low-budget productions in the horror-sci-fi genre that were made between the 1930s and 1950s. Michael Rennie starred as an alien visitor in "The Day the Earth Stood Still;" Flash Gordon, who originated as a comic strip hero in the 1934, became a film franchise by the end of the decade; Claude Rains had a breakthrough performance as the titular Invisible Man in 1933 and Fay Wray portrayed the equally.
See full article at Indiewire »

Harry Lime and the Restored The Third Man Opens in St. Louis

“Don’t be so gloomy. After all it’s not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love – they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock!”

The restored, 4k update of The Third Man opens Friday, August 7th in St. Louis at Landmark’s Plaza Frontenac Theater

Roger Ebert called Harry Lime, the character played by Orson Welles in the 1949 classic The Third Man, his favorite screen villain of all time. Fittingly, he gets one of the great movie character introductions — an unforgettable one involving a doorway, a cat, and a sudden beam of light. There’s a reason that the only Academy Award won by The Third Man, one of the most beloved films of all time,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Comic-Con 2015: Interviews with the Cast of Lost In Space

The legendary Lost in Space turns 50 years old this year and Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment will celebrate the occasion this September by releasing the complete series on Blu-ray, with over six hours of bonus features included.

At Comic-Con, Daily Dead was honored to take part in roundtable interviews with Lost in Space cast members Mark Goddard, Marta Kristen, Angela Cartwright, and Bill Mumy, who reflected on their favorite Lost in Space memories, the show's legacy, the upcoming Blu-ray, and much more.

The cast reflects on their favorite memories of working on Lost in Space from 1965–1968:

Mark Goddard: My moments are always the fun that I had with Bill [Mumy] on the show. I'm a prankster, and Billy came along with me during my pranks because I had to have him with me because I might get in trouble. If I had Billy with me, I wouldn't get in
See full article at DailyDead »

Watch: David Bowie Was the Perfect Movie Alien in 'Man Who Fell to Earth'

Watch: David Bowie Was the Perfect Movie Alien in 'Man Who Fell to Earth'
This (British) trailer goes out of its way to sell David Bowie (the best-cast alien since Michael Rennie in "Day The Earth Stood Still") as The Second Coming, but Nic Roeg and Paul Mayersberg's adaptation of Walter Tevis' novel is one of the finest sci-fi pix ever made. Brutally cut for its initial Us release, it's since been restored and is a must-see.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Do audiences want quality movies? L.A. Earthquake Flick to Pass Domestic $100M Mark Today

'San Andreas' movie with Dwayne Johnson. 'San Andreas' movie box office: $100 million domestic milestone today As the old saying (sort of) goes: If you build it, they will come. Warner Bros. built a gigantic video game, called it San Andreas, and They have come to check out Dwayne Johnson perform miraculous deeds not seen since ... George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, released two weeks earlier. Embraced by moviegoers, hungry for quality, original storylines and well-delineated characters – and with the assistance of 3D surcharges – the San Andreas movie debuted with $54.58 million from 3,777 theaters on its first weekend out (May 29-31) in North America. Down a perfectly acceptable 52 percent on its second weekend (June 5-7), the special effects-laden actioner collected an extra $25.83 million, trailing only the Melissa McCarthy-Jason Statham comedy Spy, (with $29.08 million) as found at Box Office Mojo.* And that's how this original movie – it's not officially a remake,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Disney (And Me) On TCM

This Sunday, I’m pleased to be part of a new series of Walt Disney presentations on Turner Classic Movies. I’ll be joining Ben Mankiewicz to introduce a full evening of Disney treats, including the classic Silly Symphonies short Santa’s Workshop (1932) and two other wintry cartoons, the wonderful behind-the-scenes feature The Reluctant Dragon (1941) featuring Robert Benchley, my boyhood favorite Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier (1955), the Oscar-winning True Life Adventure The Vanishing Prairie (1954), and another film I’ve always liked, Third Man on the Mountain (1959) starring James MacArthur, Michael Rennie, Janet Munro, and Herbert Lom, followed by Perilous Assignment, an...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

Disney, TCM Partner for Film Showcase, Theme Park Attraction

Disney, TCM Partner for Film Showcase, Theme Park Attraction
Disney has cut a deal with Turner Classic Movies to get more mileage out of its film vault and add the cabler’s cinephile branding to its Hollywood Studios theme park in Florida.

Starting Dec. 21, TCM will launch the recurring showcase “Treasures From the Disney Vaults,” which will feature a range of Mouse House animated and live-action gems. The first installment bows at 8 p.m. with animated shorts “Santa’s Workshop,” “On Ice” and “Chip An’ Dale,” followed by “The Disneyland Story”; 1941’s “The Reluctant Dragon,”; a compilation of the first three segs of the Fess Parker starrer “Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier”; the 1954 nature docu “The Vanishing Prairie”; and the 1959 adventure film “Third Man on the Mountain” starring Michael Rennie and James MacArthur.

At Disney’s Hollywood Studios theme park, part of the Walt Disney World Resort complex in Orlando, Fla., TCM branding and TCM anchor Robert Osborne
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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