IMDb > Nicholas Ray > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDesk
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDesk
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Nicholas Ray (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2002

16 items from 2017


Madrid Has a Cinematic Shooting Past

19 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Since the late 1950s countless large and sometimes legendary Hollywood films have been shot in or near Madrid.

Samuel Bronston-produced blockbusters, Anthony Mann’s “The Fall of the Roman Empire” and Nicholas Ray’s “55 Days at Peking” partially shot near crag-strewn La Pedriza, 30 miles north of Madrid. Charlton Heston’s “El Cid” lensed in the castle of Manzanares El Real.

In 1960, Stanley Kubrick located “Spartacus” in Alcalá de Henares, Colmenar Viejo and Navacerrada, which also hosted Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Conan the Barbarian” in 1982.

Related

Film Madrid Energizes Shooting Support

In 1964, the medieval square of Chinchón, southeast of Madrid, hosted Henry Hathaway’s John Wayne-starrer “Circus World,” which also turned Madrid’s El Paseo de Coches in El Retiro Park into Paris’ Champs Elysées.

Denise O’Dell, one of Hollywood’s favorite Spain-based producers, who ran shingle Kanzaman before launching Babieka, co-produced 2006’s “Goya’s Ghosts”: Shoots included »

- Emiliano De Pablos

Permalink | Report a problem


Montclair Review: ‘Paint It Black’ is an Impressive Directorial Debut by Amber Tamblyn

14 May 2017 6:16 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

In Amber Tamblyn’s impressive debut feature Paint It Black, a suicide sets up a tug of war between two unlikely interconnected foes: Josie (Alia Shawkat), a student who gets by modeling for a drawing class, and Meredith (Janet McTeer), a wealthy pianist, the mother of Josie’s ex-lover Michael (Rhys Wakefield). Opening in an ambitious daze, Josie awakes without Michael and heads to a punk club in her low rent L.A. neighborhood for an all-night bender. She then wakes up to a phone call from the police that Michael has taken his own life in a motel down in Twentynine Palms, California.

Arriving at the funeral, Josie is unexpectedly attacked in church by Meredith before she’s invited for out for a drink with Meredith’s ex-husband Cal (Alfred Molina), who offers his support to Josie. What follows is an ambitious character study morphing from a straightforward drama »

- John Fink

Permalink | Report a problem


The Pros and Cons of Looking Back: Close-Up on John Carpenter’s "Christine" and "Starman"

14 May 2017 3:27 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. John Carpenter's Christine (1983) is showing May 4 - June 3 and Starman (1984) is showing May 5 - June 4, 2017 in the United Kingdom.ChristineWas it too dark? Too bleak? Too gory? Did it have the misfortune of opening when American moviegoers were flocking to E.T.? Either way, when John Carpenter's The Thing landed in the summer of 1982, with an apocalyptic cliffhanger and the most surreally grotesque, tactile, gooey monster effects you never realized could be put on film, it fizzled. "It was hated," Carpenter later recalled at a screening in Los Angeles. "Hated by fans. I lost a job. People hated me. They thought I was this horrible, violent—" He trailed off and joked, "And I was." The audience laughed, because by now The Thing's exalted place in movie geek culture is secure: an exquisitely paranoid horror classic and arguably the crown »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Indian Fighter

5 May 2017 12:50 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Kirk Douglas grits his teeth and goes full macho, wrasslin’ with that beautiful Sioux up in the high country — the Sioux miss in question being the Italian model Elsa Martinelli in her screen debut. Kirk can’t decide if he wants to stay with Elsa, or lead what must be the most shameful bunch of pioneer bigots ever to cross the plains. Walter Matthau and Diana Douglas are standouts in this vigorous action western directed by André de Toth.

The Indian Fighter

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1955 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 88 min. / Street Date May 9, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Kirk Douglas, Elsa Martinelli, Walter Matthau, Diana Douglas, Walter Abel, Lon Chaney Jr., Eduard Franz, Alan Hale Jr., Elisha Cook Jr., Ray Teal, Frank Cady, Michael Winkelman, William Phipps.

Cinematography: Wilfrid M. Cline

Art Direction: Wiard Ihnen

Film Editor: Richard Cahoon

Original Music: Irving Gordon, Franz Waxman

Written by Robert L. Richards, »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


Critic's Picks: A May To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.

30 April 2017 11:33 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

James Dean And Other American Icons At The New Bev | 7165 Beverly Blvd.

One of the strongest months in recent memory at the New Beverly brings a cornucopia of classics from across the spectrum of American cinema. The all-celluloid rep house’s unofficial series for the month focuses on actor James Dean, whose three most iconic roles will be showcased in multi-night stands of George Steven's Giant (May 7, 8 and 9, screening on an Ib Tech print), Elia Kazan's East of Eden (May 10 and 11, screening with the 2005 documentary James Dean: Forever Young), and Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a »

- Jordan Cronk

Permalink | Report a problem


Entertainment or Propaganda? A Brief and Critical Look at 'Christian Films'

14 April 2017 4:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Christian movies: Starring Nicolas Cage, the widely panned 2014 apocalyptic thriller 'Left Behind' was a box office bomb – unlike (relatively) recent popular 'faith movies' such as 'Heaven Is for Real,' 'Son of God' and 'War Room.' A thought on the New Christian American Cinema: Tired of the blatant propaganda found in 'mainstream' Christian movies Two films that might be called “Christian movies” opened last week, and I decided that I wouldn't watch them, write about them, or review them – at least directly. I'm not even going to mention their titles here because I don't promote propaganda films, and that's what this recent advent of Christian movies has become: propaganda. After all, since nearly all American cinema is Christian cinema, the New Christian American Cinema is in fact pure propaganda – not cinema. Worse yet, it bores me. So, here's the thing about what we've come to call »

- Tim Cogshell

Permalink | Report a problem


Should Film Critics and Filmmakers Tweet at Each Other? — IndieWire Critics Survey

10 April 2017 11:49 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

Last week, in the lead-up to the release of the new Zach Braff film “Going in Style,” a number of film critics were surprised to discover that the director had blocked them on Twitter. Some had exchanged tweets with him in the past, while others had never directly interacted with him before. Braff’s aggressively pro-active social media practices stand in stark contrast with how some other filmmakers choose to comport themselves on social media — from budding directors who are desperate for people to see their work, to the guy who’s directing the new “Star Wars” movie, many of Braff’s contemporaries are as accessible to »

- David Ehrlich

Permalink | Report a problem


Criterion in June 2017: Mizoguchi's Ugetsu, Pagnol's Marseille Trilogy, Plus Hitchcock, Ray and Peckinpah

16 March 2017 4:00 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Come June, the Criterion Collection will be presenting some mighty fine alternatives to the Hollywood blockbuster machine. It starts with Mizoguchi Kenji's Ugetsu and includes two early works by Alfred Hitchcock (The Lodger) and Nicholas Ray (They Live By Night), as well as Sam Peckinpah's Straw Dogs, which continues to stir controversy. For those with a taste for French cinema, a newly restored version of Marcel Pagnol's Marseille Trilogy arrives on Blu-ray for the first time. Click through the gallery below to see all the Blu-ray covers and read the official descriptions from Criterion....

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

Permalink | Report a problem


The Criterion Collection Announces June Titles: ‘The Marseille Trilogy, ‘They Live by Night,’ ‘The Lodger’ and More

15 March 2017 4:01 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Marcel Pagnols’ Marseille Trilogy, Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog” and Nicholas Ray’s “They Live by Night” are among the new titles joining the Criterion Collection this June. In addition, Kenji Mizoguchi’s “Ugetsu” and Sam Peckinpah’s “Straw Dogs” are being upgraded in new Blu-ray editions. More information below.

Read More: The Criterion Collection Announces May Titles: ‘Ghost World,’ ‘Dheepan,’ ‘Jeanne Dielman’ and More

Ugetsu

“Having refined his craft in the silent era, Kenji Mizoguchi was an elder statesman of Japanese cinema-fiercely revered by Akira Kurosawa and other younger directors-by the time he made ‘Ugetsu.’ And with this exquisite ghost story, a fatalistic wartime tragedy derived from stories by Akinari Ueda and Guy de Maupassant, he created a touchstone of his art, his long takes and sweeping camera guiding the viewer through a delirious narrative about two villagers whose pursuit of fame and »

- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


Films from Alfred Hitchcock, Sam Peckinpah & More Coming to The Criterion Collection in June

15 March 2017 2:09 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

It’s mid-month, which means it is time for the next line-up for The Criterion Collection. Arriving in June is Sam Pekcinpah‘s controversial Dustin Hoffman-led thriller Straw Dogs, Alfred Hitchcock‘s early silent film The Lodger (which also includes his film from the same year of 1927, Downhill), and perhaps the most substantial release of the month, Marcel Pagnol’s The Marseille Trilogy, featuring Marius, Fanny, and César.

Also in the line-up is is Nicholas Ray‘s directorial debut, the 1948 drama They Live by Night, as well as a Blu-ray upgrade of Kenji Mizoguchi‘s landmark classic Ugetsu, which recently enjoyed a 4K theatrical restoration. Check out all the details on the releases below by clicking the box art.

»

- Leonard Pearce

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview with Cho Jinseok: I’m particularly interested in how artificial intelligence and creativity interact

11 March 2017 2:15 AM, PST | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Conceived in Busan and born in Seoul, Cho Jinseok is a filmmaker who also developed the Cholol Technique for philosophical inquiry by blending contemporary western and Korean practices of argumentation. He studied media and communications theory and Chinese language at university. Colonel Panics is his debut film.

We talk to him about his life, the film, history, technology, art and many other topics.

How does an S.Korean who deals with philosophy, and has studied media and communications theory, and Chinese language, ends up shooting a Japanese film?

A friend in Tokyo approached me a couple of years ago and asked me whether I wanted to housesit their place as they were going away for quite a while. I agreed, made the move to Tokyo and lived there for a while, soaking up the culture, the history and the people. I found the political situation in Japan very fascinating and »

- Panos Kotzathanasis

Permalink | Report a problem


Josef Von Sternberg’S Anatahan (1953)

18 February 2017 2:19 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

One of the most unusual, and unusually moving swansongs in cinema history, Josef Von Sternberg’s Anatahan (a.k.a. The Saga of Anatahan) returns to American screens this spring in a new restoration which seems destined not to only buff up the movie’s obvious visual splendor but also its standing as an essential and fully engaged work of a master Hollywood stylist rather than simply a curious end post to a remarkable career.

In the early ‘50s Sternberg was coming off two movies made for Howard Hughes—the gorgeously sublimated cold-war adventure Jet Pilot (finished in 1950 but cut extensively by Hughes and held up for release until 1957) and Macao (1952), on which Sternberg and Hughes clashed again, resulting in the director’s replacement by Nicholas Ray. Disillusioned by Hollywood, Sternberg, a long-time devotee of Japanese culture, capitalized on his separation from Hughes and began investigating the possibility, one he »

- Dennis Cozzalio

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Dark Night’ Director Tim Sutton on Violence in America and the State of Indie Film

6 February 2017 9:49 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Tim Sutton is a filmmaker with a distinct visual style, which he brings into the heart of the gun control debate with Dark Night, an entrancing, terrifying exploration of the moments before a horrible event. Following multiple characters living in a Florida town, Sutton paints an American portrait that feels doubly relevant following last year’s election and everything that’s come since. The Film Stage had an earnest conversation with the writer/director about the the business of indie film, how politics affect art and how one casts a film so it feels authentic to the story being told.

The Film Stage: When you jump into a project like this, what’s the research process like?

Tim Sutton: So, research-wise I really tried to limit myself. People have asked if I’ve talked to a lot of people in Aurora or in Denver, and I did not. The work is purely fiction, »

- Dan Mecca

Permalink | Report a problem


Mark Cousins destroys his own film with an axe at Iffr

1 February 2017 10:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

British filmmaker’s unusual stunt made for one of the quirkier moments of Iffr 2017.

In one of the more unorthodox moments of the 2017 International Rotterdam Film Festival (Iffr), following a screening of his film Bigger Than The Shining, British filmmaker Mark Cousins literally axed the film’s Dcp (digital cinema package).

In full view of the audience in Rotterdam’s Pathe cinema, where the film was screened on Wednesday (Feb 1), Cousins destroyed the Dcp, with the intention being for it to never be shown again.

Originally commissioned for Iffr 2016 and world premiering there before also screening at the Edinburgh International Film Festival, the documentary is designed to be a provocative experiment exploring subjects including copyright, male rage, and was made by combining footage from Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror classic The Shining and Nicholas Ray’s 1956 melodrama Bigger Than Life.

Screen caught up with the filmmaker to ask about the unusual event.

Literally destroying »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

Permalink | Report a problem


Iffr: Mark Cousins axes his own film in front of audience

1 February 2017 10:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

British filmmaker’s unusual stunt made for the of the quirkier moments of Iffr 2017.

In one of the more unorthodox moments of the 2017 International Rotterdam Film Festival (Iffr), following a screening of his film Bigger Than The Shining, British filmmaker Mark Cousins literally axed the film’s Dcp (digital cinema package).

In full view of the audience in Rotterdam’s Pathe cinema, where the film was screened on Wednesday (Feb 1), Cousins destroyed the Dcp, with the intention being for it to never be shown again.

Originally commissioned for Iffr 2016 and world premiering there before also screening at the Edinburgh International Film Festival, the documentary is designed to be a provocative experiment exploring subjects including copyright, male rage, and was made by combining footage from Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror classic The Shining and Nicholas Ray’s 1956 melodrama Bigger Than Life.

Screen caught up with the filmmaker to ask about the unusual event.

Literally destroying »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

Permalink | Report a problem


Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

31 January 2017 11:39 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 855

1988 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 89 min. / Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 21, 2017 / 39.95

Starring Carmen Maura, Fernando Guillén, Antonio Banderas, Julieta Serrano, Rossy de Palma, María Barranco, Kiti Manver, Guillermo Montesinos, Chus Lampreave, Yayo Calvo, Loles León, Ángel de Andrés López, José Antonio Navarro.

Cinematography: José Luis Alcaine

Film Editor: José Salcedo

Original Music: Bernardo Bonezzi

Produced by: Augustin Almodóvar

Written and Directed by Pedro Almodóvar

Connected film festival attendees learned about Pedro Almodóvar before everybody else, especially if they had an understanding of new developments in Spanish cinema. Film school had shown us nothing but the very exceptional work of Luis Buñuel, most of which is really from Mexico and France. In the 1980s we Angelenos were just getting access to films by the old-school ‘traditional’ rebel Spaniards Carlos Saura and Juan Antonio Bardem. »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2002

16 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners