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Budd Friedman Traces Standup Roots in New Book

Budd Friedman Traces Standup Roots in New Book
Ponder the last half-century of American comedy without talents like Richard Pryor, Lily Tomlin, Rodney Dangerfield, Andy Kaufman, Richard Lewis, George Carlin, Jay Leno, Joan Rivers, Bill Maher, Bill Hicks, Steve Martin, Jerry Seinfeld, Eddie Murphy and countless others, and it’s not a lot of laughs. Most of the aforementioned funny folks may have endured and thrived without Budd Friedman’s Improv Clubs in New York and Los Angeles, but those stand-up stages were so essential to the launching and developing of so many careers it’s impossible to overestimate their impact on our culture. Friedman’s New York roots led him to open his first Improv Club in mid-town Manhattan in the early 1960s. In his recently published tome “The Improv: An Oral History of the Comedy Club That Revolutionized Stand-Up” (BenBella Books, $18.87), co-written with Tripp Whetsell, Friedman and associates reminisce about Friedman’s impact and The Improv’s role in “inventing” American stand-up
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Theatre Review: Save The Last Dance For Me (UK Tour)

Save The Last Dance For Me review (UK Tour): It’s back to the British seaside of yesteryear in this foot-tapping new musical from the creatives behind Dreamboats and Petticoats.

Save The Last Dance For Me review by Katey Thompson, September 2016.

Save The Last Dance For Me review

Save The Last Dance waltzes you back to an era of typical British seaside holidays, with candy floss, ice creams and rock and roll. The production, written by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, surrounds you with the instantly recognisable songs from bands of the day, including The Drifters, Elvis Presley, Ray Charles, Ben E King and Booker T and the MGs.

The show opens with Jennifer (Lola Saunders) and Marie (Elizabeth Carter) planning their first summer holiday without their parents in uptown Lowestoft. They have wildly different ideas of what their perfect summer holiday would be and find anything but what they had imagined.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Beyond Fright: A Look Back At David Lynch’s Lost Highway Soundtrack

Very few films affect me the way that David Lynch’s 1997 mystery/thriller (I consider it a horror film) Lost Highway does. Maybe it was the adventure I had to go through to see it (read about that here), or maybe its surreal, noir-like mood and tone of the film that made it so very easy to rope me in, leaving a large imprint in my mind. While the film itself can stand so very firmly on its own, it was made even more effective and chilling, by what is, in my opinion, one of the greatest soundtrack of all time. A perfect compilation, and an even more perfect companion to the film, the mix of Angelo Badalamenti and Barry Adamson’s score, and a hell of a lot of great bands flow together perfectly, making it a soundtrack that deserves attention, even seventeen years later.

Beginning with noise, the
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Movie Review - A.K.A. Doc Pomus (2013)

A.K.A. Doc Pomus, 2013.

Directed by Peter Miller and Will Hechter.

Starring Willie Burke, Dr. John, Dion Dimucci, Ben E. King, B.B. King, Joan Osborne, Lou Reed and Doc Pomus (archival footage).

Synopsis:

Paralyzed since childhood by polio Jerome Felder overcomes the crippling disease to become a renowned songwriter called Doc Pomus.

Often a song is associated with a group or solo artist but the originator of the tuneful and lyrical creation often becomes a historical footnote. Filmmakers Peter Miller and Will Hechter who collaborated together on Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story (2010) have sought to rectify the oversight by casting the spotlight on the songsmith responsible for classics such as Save the Last Dance for Me, This Magic Moment, A Teenager in Love, and Viva Las Vegas.

Considering all the hardships he faced it is not surprising Jerome Felder connected with Blues music. The active child was sent away
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Martha Thomases: Sweet Lou

  • Comicmix
Word of Lou Reed’s death spread across the Internet on Sunday. For me, it was Sunday afternoon, so I can’t make this allusion. Nor will I call it a perfect day.

That’s what Lou Reed was to me. From the time his first album came out, he provided not only a soundtrack for my life, but a running commentary. His New York-inflected nasal vocals seemed to perfectly capture my own yearning for something I couldn’t define, but wanted desperately.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, this made me unusual, especially in Ohio, where I lived. Lou had a hit in the mid-1970s, but there still weren’t a lot of people who would admit to liking him. I can only believe that people bought “Walk on the Wild Side” without acknowledging that they knew it was about drag queens.

He wrote about drag queens,
See full article at Comicmix »

Watch: Exclusive Clip for Documentary on Legendary Songwriter 'Aka Doc Pomus'

Check out an exclusive clip for documentary "Aka Doc Pomus," on legendary New York songwriter Doc Pomus, which hit theaters in New York October 4, and opens in Los Angeles October 11.Brooklyn Jew Pomus started out as an improbable blues singer inspired by Joe Turner, and wound up a Brill Building songwriter who churned out more than 1000 songs with a series of collaborators over the years. He churned out many classics (“Save the Last Dance for Me,” “This Magic Moment,” "Little Sister," “A Teenager in Love,” “Viva Las Vegas,” and hundreds of other hits). This new doc sheds light on the man behind the lyrics. Revered in the music community for his generosity and charity to the less fortunate, Pomus suffered from polio from an early age and through most of his life was confined to crutches and a wheelchair. Yet during his sixty-five years he managed to work with the likes of Bob Dylan,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Film Reviews: Opening This Week (Sept. 30-Oct. 4, 2013)

A critical digest of the week’s latest U.S. theatrical releases. Where applicable, links to longer reviews have been provided.

Gravity

Distributor: Warner Bros.

About halfway through Alfonso Cuaron’s astonishing “Gravity,” Sandra Bullock, playing a lost astronaut stranded 375 miles above Earth, seeks refuge in an abandoned spacecraft and curls into a floating fetal position, savoring a brief respite from her harrowing journey. Of the many sights to behold in this white-knuckle space odyssey, a work of great narrative simplicity and visual complexity, it’s this image that speaks most eloquently to Cuaron’s gifts as a filmmaker: He’s the rare virtuoso capable of steering us through vividly imagined worlds and into deep recesses of human feeling. Suspending viewers alongside Bullock for a taut, transporting 91 minutes (with George Clooney in a sly supporting turn), the director’s long-overdue follow-up to “Children of Men” is at once a nervy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Aka Doc Pomus

Did you know that the enduring rock ‘n’ roll ballad “Save the Last Dance For Me” was written by someone who could not dance? Stricken with polio at the age of 6, Jerome Felder spent much of his life on crutches or in a wheelchair. Once you know this and recognize the soulfulness of the lyrics, you begin to understand why the man universally known as Doc Pomus was so widely admired—by fans, friends, and colleagues ranging from John Lennon to Bob Dylan. Among his many standards are “This Magic Moment,” “A Teenager in Love,” “Viva Las Vegas,” and a stunning 1981 number introduced by B.B. King, “There Must be a Better World Somewhere.” How a nice Jewish boy from Brooklyn became a blues...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

The Great and Pained Life of a Polio-Striken R&B Hitmaker in A.K.A. Doc Pomus

The thrilling story of Brooklyn's most beloved polio-stricken white boy r&b genius, Peter Miller and Will Hechter's A.K.A. Doc Pomus bops along with the simple, sturdy power of a good Doc Pomus song: It's constructed with techniques familiar to anyone with a passing awareness of its genre—but also with such wit and insight and serious longing that it moves as much as it grooves. Pomus, a warm and Falstaffian fellow seen here in old interview footage, wrote blues-steeped pop hits as eternal as "Save the Last Dance for Me," "Lonely Avenue," "This Magic Moment," and several of Elvis's very best—"Viva Las Vegas," "Little Sister," and that soulful masterpiece "A Mess of Blues"—but he started as an r&b shouter himself, swapping his birth name, Jerome Felder, for his ...
See full article at Village Voice »

Feature Doc on Songwriter Doc Pomus Gets Theatrical Release in October

After making the festival rounds over the past year, including New York’s Stony Brook Film Festival where it won the grand prize in August, 2012, “Aka Doc Pomus,” about the songwriter behind such hits as “Save the Last Dance for Me,” “This Magic Moment” and “A Teenager in Love,” will have a theatrical release beginning Oct. 4 at New York’s Village East Cinemas and Oct. 11 at L.A.’s Laemmle Music Hall.

The film is self-released, with Cinedigm Entertainment is handling VOD release in early November.

Directed by Peter Miller and Will Hechter, “Aka Doc Pomus” features interviews with the songwriter’s collaborators and friends, including Dr. John, Joan Osborne, Shawn Colvin, Dion, Gerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. Passages from Pomus’ private journals are read by Lou Reed.

Born in Brooklyn as Jerome Felder, Pomus was paralyzed with polio as a child and confined to crutches and a wheelchair for most of his life.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

18th Annual St. Louis Jewish Film Festival June 9-13

The St. Louis Jewish Film Festival, held annually at the Landmark Plaza Frontenac Cinema (1701 S Lindbergh Blvd #210, St Louis, Mo 63131), is one of the local Jewish community’s most popular and highly attended events of the year. Each year, the festival presents international Jewish films, both documentaries and features that explore universal issues through traditional Jewish values, opposing viewpoints and new perspectives. And each year, the fest packs ‘em in so get there early – it’s first come first serve for seats and those Frontenac theaters aren’t very big. Attendance is always through the roof for this thing, a testament to the group’s marketing and choice of programming. Guest lecturers are brought to the fest to discuss and illuminate the subjects of these films. This year’s St. Louis Jewish Film Festival runs Sunday, June 9th through Thursday June 13th.

The 18th Annual St. Louis Jewish Film Festival
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’
The sounds of the early 1960s folk music revival float on the air like a strange, intoxicating perfume in the Coen brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis,” a boldly original, highly emotional journey through Greenwich Village nightclubs, a bleak New York winter, and one man’s fraught efforts to reconcile his life and his art. A product of the same deeply personal end of the Coens’ filmmaking spectrum previously responsible for the likes of “Barton Fink” and “A Serious Man,” this darkly comic musical drama with an elliptical narrative and often brusque protagonist won’t corral the same mass audience as “No Country for Old Men” and “True Grit.” But strong reviews — for the pic itself and its stupendous soundtrack — should make this December release an awards-season success for distrib CBS Films.

As they did with the 1940s Hollywood setting of “Barton Fink,” the Coens have again taken a real time and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Full Frame 2013 Review: ‘A.K.A. Doc Pomus’ is an Honorable Tribute With Few Magic Moments

There are two kinds of biographical documentaries, the kind about a person we know and want to learn more about and the kind about a person we don’t know but should be aware of (according to the filmmakers, anyway). Few films are exclusively one or the other, because different viewers have different levels of familiarity with different subjects. Someone could presumably go into Marley completely ignorant of who Bob Marley was, while someone else might watch xi with full appreciation already of who Rodriguez is. I mention two music docs since the overlap likely occurs more so with this genre. And because this is a review of a doc about a notable songwriter, Doc Pomus. In certain circles, that’s a very famous name. But for a lot of us, the lyricist behind such tunes as “Viva Las Vegas,” “This Magic Moment,” “Save the Last Dance for Me,” “Suspicion” and many others is not only obscure
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

'A.K.A. Doc Pomus' Wins Grand Prize at Stony Brook Film Festival

  • Indiewire
At this year's 17th Annual Stony Brook Film Festival, Peter Miller and William Hechter's documentary about blues singer and songwriter Doc Pomus, "A.K.A. Doc Pomus," took home the Festival's highest honor. The festival ran from July 19th-28th and featured 33 full length and short films from around the world. Full list of Stony Brook Film Festival winners: Grand Prize Winner: "A.K.A Doc Pomus"- Directed by Peter Miller and William Hechter Audience Choice Award: "Wunderkinder"- Directed by Marcus O. Rosenmüller. Written by Stephen Glantz and Rolf Schübel from a story by Art Bernd Jury Award Best Feature: "Shuffle"- Written and directed by Kurt Kuenne "Taped"- Written by Marnie Blok and Diederik Van Rooijen Audience Choice Best Short: "Bordando La Frontera"- A Film by by René Rhi Jury Award Best Short: ...
See full article at Indiewire »

Oh My Jonas! Update - 03/16/10

  • PopStar
Oh My Jonas! It's only Tuesday and there's already so much to report, as Nick's gig in New York at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame turns out to be a rumor; the auction to win a chance to meet Joe, Nick and Kevin closes today; and two tweet-hearts get the full treatment on Twitter! There's even a Jonas Brothers fan club in Singapore, and we've got the link! Check out our full coverage of all the latest Jb news and views! Rumor: Nick at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Rock and Roll is here to stay, but on this occasion, Nick Jonas wasn't there! The Internet was buzzing yesterday over Nick's "scheduled" performance at at the 25th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony, which took place last night in New York City. He was reportedly set to sing the 1959 song "A Teenager in Love," written
See full article at PopStar »

Nick Jonas Joins All-Star Performers for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony

Nick Jonas will take part at the 25th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. The one-third of the Jonas Brothers has got the honor to perform a 1959 song written by this year's inductee Mort Shuman and previously-inducted musician Doc Pomus titled "A Teenager In Love".

The 17-year-old singer joins other performers set for the show, including Fefe Dobson, Eric Burdon of The Animals, Chris Isaak, Ronnie Spector, Peter Wolf, Faith Hill, Adam Levine and Jesse Carmichael of Maroon 5 as well as Pat Monahan of Train. He will take the stage at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City on Monday, March 15.

Abba, Genesis, Jimmy Cliff, The Hollies and The Stooges are among those to be inducted this year. Music producer David Geffen and seven songwriters, including Jeff Barry, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil, Ellie Greenwich, Jesse Stone and Otis Blackwell, are also included on the induction list as well.
See full article at Celebrity Mania »

Nick Jonas to Perform at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Ceremony

Nick Jonas is expected to perform at the 25th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. The youngest member of the Jonas Brothers reportedly is scheduled to sing "A Teenager In Love", a 1959 song written by this year's inductee Mort Shuman and previously-inducted musician Doc Pomus.

The gig will take place at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City on March 15 and is going to be broadcast live at 8:30 P.M. on Fuse. Other musical guests include Fefe Dobson, Eric Burdon of The Animals, Chris Isaak, Ronnie Spector, Peter Wolf, Faith Hill, Adam Levine and Jesse Carmichael of Maroon 5 as well as Pat Monahan of Train.

This year's inductees are Abba, Genesis, Jimmy Cliff, The Hollies and The Stooges. They will be presented by Bee Gees' members Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb, Trey Anastasio, Wyclef Jean, Steven Van Zandt and Joe Armstrong respectively.

Additionally, producer
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

See also

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