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Robert Plant Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (5) | Trivia (27) | Personal Quotes (23)

Overview (4)

Born in West Bromwich, West Midlands, England, UK
Birth NameRobert Anthony Plant
Nicknames The Golden God
Percy
Tall Cool One
Height 6' 1" (1.86 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Prior to Hobbstweedle (a pickup blues band formed to honour a gig at West Midlands College Of Education) Robert was the frontman for The Band of Joy - featuring Percy, John Bonham, Paul Lockey (bass), Chris Brown (keyboards) and Kevyn Gammond (guitar). The BOJ were on verge of making a record deal when they split a little acrinmoniously. This led to Rob eventually joining Led Zeppelin after a few blind alleys. The rest is history.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Beresford du-Cille

Spouse (1)

Maureen Wilson (9 November 1969 - 1983) (divorced) (3 children)

Trade Mark (5)

Mystical, philosophical and spiritual lyrics
Long blond hair
High pitched voice
Powerful multi octave Voice
Frequently preformed with tight jeans and open shirts

Trivia (27)

Played in a band called Hobbstweeble prior to Led Zeppelin, and The Honeydrippers after them.
Also had a successful solo singing career.
Lead singer and harmonica player of Led Zeppelin.
Wife is of East Indian descent and raised in England.
Daughter Carmen, sons Karac (died of a virus) and Logan.
Daughter Carmen is married to Charlie Jones, Plant's bass player for solo tours.
Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (as a member of Led Zeppelin) in 1995.
During a break from the 1975 American tour, Plant and his family were seriously injured in a jeep wreck. This not only caused the remainder of the tour to be cancelled, but it also prevented the band from filming additional footage for their concert film The Song Remains the Same (1976).
Formed the side project The Honeydrippers in 1985. A mini-EP of the band featured appearances by former Led Zeppelin bandmate Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck.
He suffered a breakdown following the death of his five-year-old son Karac. The Led Zeppelin hit "All of My Love" and Plant's solo hit "I Believe" are dedicated to Karac.
It's not well known that the boys from Led Zeppelin and Elvis Presley became quite friendly in the 1970s. They met on numerous occasion and Zeppelin attended at least two Elvis concerts, sitting front row center.
Elvis Presley once teased Plant about not owning his own plane--Elvis asked where Led Zeppelin got the jet. "We rented it from Caesar's Palace" said Plant. "I own mine" replied Elvis.
Led Zeppelin was voted the 14th Greatest Rock 'n' Roll Artists of all time by Rolling Stone.
Attended the funeral in 2004 of DJ John Peel.
In the song "Stairway to Heaven," he uses the phrase "stairway to heaven" three times.
On 11/14/2006 Led Zeppelin was inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame for their outstanding contribution to British music and integral part of British music culture.
Ranked #37 on VH1's 100 Sexiest Artists.
Was the only member of Led Zeppelin whose name did not begin with the letter "J".
In the years following Led Zeppelin's break-up, Jimmy Page would not allow anyone else to sing "Stairway to Heaven." Page felt that Plant was the only person who could do the song justice.
When Jimmy Page heard of Plant playing in another 1960s band, Hobbstweedle, he invited him to become the lead singer for a new rock band--Led Zeppelin.
His biggest influences were Elvis Presley and The Doors' lead singer Jim Morrison.
He was awarded the CBE (Commander of the Order of the British Empire) in the 2009 Queen's New Years Honours List for his services to music.
Fervent Wolverhampton Wanderers supporter.
The youngest member of Led Zeppelin.
Lives in Austin, TX.
As of December 2008, he was living in Bewdley, Worcestershire, England.
Shares his birthday with Phil Lynott, the bass player and lead vocalist of Thin Lizzy.

Personal Quotes (23)

[on Bo Diddley] His voice and relentless, glorious anthems echo down through my years. This royal shapeshifter continues to influence four generations of musicians on a daily basis.
[on Roy Harper] The dynamics and drama in Roy's music are phenomenal.
I find ironing helps get me in the mood before I perform. I always have an ironing board in my room before going on.
[on Led Zeppelin's infamous performance at Live Aid (1985)] Live Aid was a fucking atrocity. It made us look like loonies.
It's a two-dimensional gig being a singer, and you can get lost in your own tedium and repetition.
I asked Nic [Band of Joy road manager Nicola Powell] if my rambling between songs on stage is getting too obscure. She says no, it's just about mad enough to capture the spirit of the thing.
When you see what we did last night [in Toronto], that is why we do it. Yes, there's a lot of smiling on stage, but there's a lot of hard work and there are a lot of fuck-ups too. We've worked together a lot now, we know each other; there are no secret corners. I'm as absurd as ever and they are gratefully patient. Every male-driven innuendo I come up with, Patti [Patty Griffin, touring with band of Joy in 2010] just rolls her eyes and chuckles.

"We are good at everything you would expect to be good because you could never find more talented musicians than these; playing together or in those passages sometimes when people are dropping in and out, when sometimes one of us will just opt out for a minute and a half.
When you hear Morth African or Indo-jazz fusion in the Band of Joy mix, that is mine. If I take credit for anything in this band, that's it, that's something I've brought to Nashville, and I'm proud of that.
[on his singing] [My style has] subliminal flutters passing Don Van Vliet, Son House, Terry Reid and the call to prayer from the minaret of the Koutoubia in Marrakech, all waiting to contribute to the next sound. Every 16 bars, we visit another country.
The further I get into it, the harder it will be to get a gig in the Top Rank. I won't fit. If I continue doing this, it will mean obsolescence for me.
I'm just incredibly fortunate that my eyes and ears have been opened. I have to be honest with myself and remove as much of the repetition and fakery as is humanly possible. To soothe the savage heart, we have to repeat ourselves sometimes--that's entertainment.
[on Led Zeppelin] That tumultuous, amazing combination of friends. We were great when we were great. I was part of something magnificent which broke the Guinness Book of Records, but in the end, what are you going to get out of it? Who are you doing it for? You have to ask these questions: who pays the piper, and what is valuable in this life? I don't want to scream "Immigrant Song" every night for the rest of my life, and I'm not sure I could.
The physical topography, and the regional peculiarities of the place I come from [Kidderminster, Worcestershire, UK] is so much part of me. But I plough a lone furrow, and I do feel more and more this telepathy with south Nashville. That is where this music is, that is where the mind is. I need to be with these people.
I'm a singer, and there's a lot of singing in this band [Band of Joy]. When one sings like this, with others, the voice is good. I'm really pleased with how I sing with this band. Hell, never mind my raison d'être, what about my singing? How else am I going to feel accomplished?
Whenever I have bid a hasty goodbye to a loved one, I've always made sure that my record collection was safely stored away in the boot of the car. Sometimes the parting was so fast, I was not able to get them into alphabetical order, but I still got away with my records, that was essential.
There are far more important things than this [Band of Joy]. This is just a little bit of ear candy, really, in the great cut and thrust of things. For some people, it's just a night at the theatre. Never mind politics--it's true of everybody, just getting on with their lives. For me, it is something to do which gives me very great pleasure. Which is why I'll keep on making music, so long as it meets the standard.
When I was a kid, I'd be there in the stands thinking, "Come on Wolves [Wolverhampton Wanderers, his favorite soccer team], do it for me!" And here I am again: "Come on Wolves", pleading with a borrowed laptop!
Every band should end their show with "Stairway To Heaven". In fact, The Who do a very nice version of it.
[on John Bonham] Bonzo was totally and absolutely devoted to getting it right. Everything that he listened to he could go beyond, not only could he recreate it but he could take it somewhere new. He knew that he was a powerhouse among drummers . . . we seemed to have a great affinity for each other.
Sad old hippies still keep their hair long because we were part of something that meant something more than just ego and income.
A drummer contacted me and said, "I love Bonham [John Bonham] so much I wanna sit behind you when you sing". It was Phil Collins. His career was just kicking in and he was the most spirited and positive and really encouraging force.
Kashmir, to me, is the definitive Led Zeppelin song.
Jimi Hendrix once told Bonham that he had a right foot like that of a rabbit.

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