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The Thomas Crown Affair

Hollywood glamour strikes the crime genre, with a bank robbery tale that concentrates on high living and high fashion. Superstars Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway play a coy game of thief and investigator. This expensive show is not really in fashion anymore, but in 1968 it was high-class filmmaking, with Norman Jewison solidifying his position as a smart maker of solid mainstream entertainment.

The Thomas Crown Affair

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber

1968 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 102 min. / Street Date February 13, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Steve McQueen, Faye Dunaway, Paul Burke, Jack Weston, Biff McGuire, Astrid Heeren, Gordon Pinsent, Yaphet Kotto, Bruce Glover.

Cinematography: Haskell Wexler

Film Editor: Hal Ashby, Byron Brandt, Ralph E. Winters

Montage and title design: Pablo Ferro

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Written by Alan R. Trustman

Produced and Directed by Norman Jewison

Ah, 1968 was a good movie year. I remember my father returning from a car hunt (before he bought
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

7 Essential Debut Films Directed By Female Filmmakers, From ‘Ratcatcher’ to ‘The Virgin Suicides’

7 Essential Debut Films Directed By Female Filmmakers, From ‘Ratcatcher’ to ‘The Virgin Suicides’
When Greta Gerwig’s already-lauded “Lady Bird” hits limited release later this week, the actress-writer-director will join a long line of other female filmmakers who used their directorial debut (this one is Gerwig’s solo directorial debut, just for clarity’s sake) to not only launch their careers, but make a huge mark while doing it. Gerwig’s Saoirse Ronan-starring coming-of-age tale is an instant classic, and one that shouldn’t come as much of a surprise to anyone who has enjoyed Gerwig’s charming work as a screenwriter in recent years, bolstered by her ear for dialogue and her love of complicated and complex leading ladies.

While Hollywood still lags when it comes to offering up opportunities to its most talented female filmmakers, many of them have overcome the dismal stats to deliver compelling, interesting, and unique first features. In short, they’re good filmmakers who made good movies,
See full article at Indiewire »

Two Lovers And A Bear Review [Tiff 2016]

Despite being the setting of one of early cinema’s seminal works, the Canadian North rarely comes to mind as a prime region for cinematic exploration. Kim Nguyen’s new film Two Lovers and a Bear takes advantage of this relatively untapped environment to depict a story where geographical isolation serves as a microcosm of universal, existential isolation, where love is essential for survival.

This is one of those movies where its sense of place is integral to every aspect of its being: its plot, its themes, and its performances. It takes place in Nunavut, a territory whose remoteness is exemplified by how isolated it is from the rest of Canada, a country that already feels relatively separated from civilization. Despair is ubiquitous in its harsh conditions, with sanctuary found in community, or in sparse supplies of alcohol.

Our principal characters, the titular lovers, are Roman, played by Dane DeHaan,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Toronto: Canadian Filmmakers in the Fest Grab Global Attention

Toronto: Canadian Filmmakers in the Fest Grab Global Attention
The 2016 Toronto Intl. Film Festival’s slate of 20-plus homegrown features reveals Canadians as engaged citizens of the world, ready for action. While Canadian films often land with domestic distribution and international sales rep set, an increasing number of films have been working the fest with U.S. reps, and finding stateside success. (Geared towards Canadian talent, Sept. 12’s panel “The American Dream” addresses U.S. market realities and digital-age strategies.) U.S. reps aim to further momentum of Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only the End of the World,” Stella Meghie’s “Jean of the Joneses,” Nathan Morlando’s “Mean Dreams,” and Kim Nguyen’s “Two Lovers and a Bear” — all well received at international fests this past spring. (Fun fact: The voice of Nguyen’s bear, beloved Canadian thesp Gordon Pinsent, is also the subject of Brigitte Berman’s Toronto-preening doc “The River of My Dreams.”) Reflecting the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

First Trailer For ‘Two Lovers and a Bear’ Starring Tatiana Maslany and Dane DeHaan

After a promising initial line-up, the Toronto International Film Festival has delivered more titles with their full Canadian slate. Among the line-up is Xavier Dolan‘s It’s Only the End of the World, Bruce MacDonald‘s new feature Weirdos, Deepa Mehta‘s Anatomy of Violence, as well as Two Lovers and a Bear, starring Tatiana Maslany and Dane DeHaan, which we have the first trailer for today.

We said in our review from Cannes, “Kim Nguyen’s Two Lovers and a Bear is a film that suffers from a bit of an identity crisis. Like an indie playlist stuck on constant shuffle, unapologetically reveling in a sort of manic unclassifiable genre. This isn’t always necessarily a bad thing, but, for some reason, Nguyen’s scattershot tonal shifts — which hop between a romance on the rocks; a self-serious study of grieving; and a surreal buddy comedy — can prove quite jarring.
See full article at The Film Stage »

[Cannes Review] Two Lovers and a Bear

Kim Nguyen’s Two Lovers and a Bear is a film that suffers from a bit of an identity crisis. Like an indie playlist stuck on constant shuffle, unapologetically reveling in a sort of manic unclassifiable genre. This isn’t always necessarily a bad thing, but, for some reason, Nguyen’s scattershot tonal shifts — which hop between a romance on the rocks; a self-serious study of grieving; and a surreal buddy comedy — can prove quite jarring. The film is, at its core, a look at how we choose to deal with grief and past trauma. Whether that happens to be with booze, destroying an arctic outpost, or even talking to a deadpan polar bear is another matter.

Lucy (Tatiana Maslany) and Roman (Dane DeHaan) are two lost souls who have chosen a life at the end of the world, as Herzog might call it. They both work infrastructural jobs of some description in a small,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Brian D. Johnson’s Documentary ‘Al Purdy Was Here’ Finds Poetry in Cinema

Was it Godard or was it Truffaut who said “critics make the best directors”?

A film critic by trade and a poet in his heart, Brian D. Johnson began his film “Al Purdy Was Here” as a fundraising tool to save the A-frame cabin in the woods built by Canadian poet Al Purdy and his wife Eurithe. As making the film progressed, Johnson began to see much more in the film than merely a vehicle [piece] to raise money. “Al Purdy Was Here” soon evolved into something much greater, something deeply poetic by a writer who himself treasures poetry even as he critiques films….

Brian says, “It is about art and life and the fact that they are often in conflict as we try to make our lives. Poetry is my aim…finding poetry in cinema. But music was the reason I made the film.”

Canada's leading musicians and artists come together to tell the tale of Al Purdy.

The documentary features archival materials and first-hand accounts, including interviews with his publisher Howard White, editor Sam Solecki, widow Eurithe Purdy, poets Dennis Lee, Steven Heighton and George Bowering—and Bowering's wife Jean Baird, the powerhouse behind the campaign to save and restore Purdy's A-Frame cabin.

Read Indiewire for more about the movie here.

Gordon Pinsent (“Away from Her”), Michael Ondaatje (“The English Patient”), Leonard Cohen (“Natural Born Killers”), Margaret Atwood (“The Handmaid’s Tale”) all pay tribute to him along with other well known writers, actors, directors and singers who adapt his poetry.

This film premiered, naturally enough, at Tiff 2015 but I only caught up with it at Iff Panama this year because Brian – whom I met one year in Havana and loaned him $100 to pay his hotel bill -- was at Iff Panama where his film was screening. With him was our friend-in-common, Latinaphile, Helga Stephenson, so I tagged along as a friend to see a film about a person I had never heard of before. And I was entranced by what I saw.

Al Purdy was known to be a raucous, barroom brawling Canadian poet, something on a par with Charles Bukowski. In fact they were friends and corresponded extensively, but there is some question as to whether Purdy’s character as a barroom brawler was put on as his persona to help popularize his poetry. Was he actually such a rough person? His wife, Eurithe Purdy, who survived him and is featured in the movie said that at home he was quite a peaceable man (when he was not boozing it up with his pals). He was also a philosophical soul, enraptured by nature—Canada's Walt Whitman as well as its Bukowski.

Sl: How did you get these musicians?

I went to the pantheon of famous Canadian singer-songwriters and asked them to compose and record music inspired by Purdy's work. We paid engineers and musicians. But the artists licensed their songs to us for free, and in return they got to own the rights to the songs.

I got in touch with Neil Young through his brother. I loved Neil's music, and interviewed him for one of his films. Remember Neil Young: Heart of Gold directed by Jonathan Demme?

I sent Neil a Purdy poem called "My 48 Pontiac", written from the Pov of a car in a junk yard—knowing Neil loves old cars. He never did get around to recording an original number for us, but he loved the poem, and the project. So when we wanted to use "Journey Through the Past" (from Neil's 1971 Massey Hall concert album) on the soundtrack, he gave us the rights at no cost.

We selected half a dozen songs for the movie but commissioned and recorded six more, and we're assembling all of them on an album called "The Al Purdy Songbook".

Meanwhile, the film's score was composed by my son, Casey Johnson, who recorded it all with purely analog technology—in the spirit of Purdy's rough and raw esthetic.

The music played at a 2013 benefit concert to save Purdy's cabin in the woods become the impetus for me to make the movie. I remember leaving the show and telling the organizers, "The next thing you should do is an Al Purdy Songbook.") I didn't know I'd end up doing it myself. And as it turned out, it was the music that made the film possible. Musicians are more famous than poets. They have an audience. And this is a movie about a dead poet. How do you make a movie about a dead poet?

The music brings it to life . . . I suppose I could have made a zombie movie instead.

Sl: How did you cast the movie?

You get the most famous people lined up and then the rest follow. I’m friends with Michael Ondaatje. I know Margaret Atwood. I know Leonard Cohen. So I started there.

Sl: How did you finance the film?

The CBC Documentary Channel gave us 25% of the budget and that triggered the rest of the financing. The Rogers Documentary Fund and the Rogers Cable Fund became the other principal contributors.

But Ron Mann, who exec produced, got the ball rolling, and his company, Films We Like, came onboard as the Canadian distributor. We're still looking for international distribution.

The movie felt like a barn-raising, with everyone pitching in to help make it work.

Brian D. Johnson is former film critic for Maclean's, Canada's weekly newsmagazine, is the current president of the Toronto Film Critics Association. Over the years, he also worked as a musician and published poetry, a novel, and several works of non-fiction, including a 25th-anniversary history of Tiff, "Brave Films, Wild Nights, 25 Years of Festival Fever. "Al Purdy was Here” (2015) is his first feature documentary. Once again he'll be writing about film for Maclean's in May at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Blacula

Blaxploitation films burst onto the scene in 1971 with the huge success of Gordon Park’s Shaft. By 1972, audiences were clamoring for more, and filmmakers and studios were keen to jump on the bandwagon. While most of the majors were focusing on the Shaft formula of hot chicks and cool Dicks, American International Pictures saw a void that no one had filled yet: the black horror film. And so, with as little money as they usually invested, they sent forth into the world Blacula (1972), and wouldn’t you know it? Audiences loved it.

Just don’t call it Blaxploitation—because it isn’t. Blacula, surprisingly, showcases little of the developing tropes already established by Shaft. There is no "jive" talk, no gratuitous nudity or overwhelming violence. And I say "surprisingly", because it would have been so easy (not to mention profitable) to follow the formula set in motion by Shaft, Superfly,
See full article at DailyDead »

Win ‘The Grand Seduction’ Starring Brendan Gleeson On DVD!

To celebrate the release of The Grand Seduction starring Brendan Gleeson (Calvary, The Guard, In Bruges) and Taylor Kitsch (True Detective Season 2) – on DVD 5th January 2015 – we have a copy of the film to giveaway courtesy of Entertainment One.

Brendan Gleeson once again delivers a fantastic performance in a delightful comedy that is full of charm, wit and boasts stand-out performances from a stellar cast. Taylor Kitsch, more known for his science fiction blockbusters shows great comedy prowess and exactly why he is such a big name in Hollywood. Rounding off the main cast is the stunning Liane Balaban and Canadian actor Gordon Pinsent, who provide some truly laugh out loud moments!

It’s available to order on Amazon today: http://amzn.to/1wm0P7E but you can also be in with a chance of winning by telling us, who’s Brendan Gleeson’s About Time-starring son?

Send your answer,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Best Canadian Movies of 2014: Films and Moments That Ruled the Big Screen

  • Moviefone
Canada has a wealth of cinematic talent, and always has. From our comedic genius to our often cerebral approach to filmmaking, this country has a lot to be proud of.

Of late, and especially this year, Canada has really dominated the movies landscape. Our homegrown actors (Sarah Gadon, for example) and directors (Xavier Dolan, "Mommy") have been everywhere, earning accolades around the world. Movies shot within our borders have won rave reviews and received praise from the highest-ranked critics and film festivals.

Perhaps most outstanding is our growth. No longer are we satisfied with melancholic snow landscapes (though sometimes those still appear); we've branched out, and we're trying new things. Here, in no particular order, are my favourite Canadian movies and moments of 2014.

"Mommy" Knocked Our Socks Off

Young Canadian director Xavier Dolan has been getting accolades from critics, pundits and moviegoers from a very young age, so it's no
See full article at Moviefone »

Giveaway – Win The Grand Seduction on DVD

To celebrate the release of “The Grand Seduction” starring Brendan Gleeson (Calvary, The Guard, In Bruges) and Taylor Kitsch (True Detective Season 2) – on DVD 5th January 2015 – we have a copy of the film to giveaway courtesy of Entertainment One.

Brendan Gleeson once again delivers a fantastic performance in a delightful comedy that is full of charm, wit and boasts stand-out performances from a stellar cast. Taylor Kitsch, more known for his science fiction blockbusters shows great comedy prowess and exactly why he is such a big name in Hollywood. Rounding off the main cast is the stunning Liane Balaban and Canadian actor Gordon Pinsent, who provide some truly laugh out loud moments!

Brendan Gleeson is Murray, a once proud fisherman who now, along with his former colleagues in the harbour of Tickle Cove are out of work and forced to live off welfare. Prohibited from fishing enough to make a
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Competition: Win ‘The Grand Seduction’ on DVD

To celebrate the release of The Grand Seduction starring Brendan Gleeson (Calvary, The Guard, In Bruges) and Taylor Kitsch (True Detective Season 2) – on DVD 5th January 2015 – we have a copy of the film to giveaway courtesy of Entertainment One.

Brendan Gleeson once again delivers a fantastic performance in a delightful comedy that is full of charm, wit and boasts stand-out performances from a stellar cast. Taylor Kitsch, more known for his science fiction blockbusters shows great comedy prowess and exactly why he is such a big name in Hollywood. Rounding off the main cast is the stunning Liane Balaban and Canadian actor Gordon Pinsent, who provide some truly laugh out loud moments!

Available to order on Amazon today: http://amzn.to/1wm0P7E

To win a copy of The Grand Seduction on DVD just answer the following question:

The Grand Seduction co-stars Taylor Kitsch. But which big budget sci-fi movie did he star in?
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Blacula: The Complete Collection’ Blu-ray Review

Urban action and fatal attraction give rise to a groove from beyond the grave in this funkadelic, fangadelic blaxploitation double-bill from Eureka Entertainment, which sees the eternally cool William Marshall put a fresh spin on the age-old legend of the vampire, condemned to wander the earth with an insatiable lust for blood as Blacula.

Produced at the height of the blaxploitation era, the Blacula movies are the perfect blend of genre and social film making, the types of which hadn’t been seen before… or since!

Blacula (1972)

Stars: William Marshall, Vonetta McGee, Denise Nicholas, Thalmus Rasulala, Gordon Pinsent, Charles Macaulay, Emily Yancy, Ted Harris, Rick Metzler | Written by Joan Torres, Raymond Koenig | Directed by William Crain

In 1780, African Prince Mamuwalde (Marshall) pays a visit to Count Dracula in Transylvania, seeking his support in ending the slave trade. Instead, the evil count curses his noble guest and transforms him into a vampire!
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The Grand Seduction review: Brendan Gleeson tries to woo Taylor Kitsch

The Grand Seduction review: Brendan Gleeson tries to woo Taylor Kitsch
Director: Don McKellar; Screenwriter: Michael Dowse, Ken Scott; Starring: Brendan Gleeson, Taylor Kitsch, Liane Balaban, Gordon Pinsent, Rhonda Rodgers; Running time: 113 mins; Certificate: 12A

Brendan Gleeson is perfectly cast in The Grand Seduction, a comedy drama that aims to send up the postcard image of rural life. Unfortunately, Canadian director Don McKellar falls into his own trap with a storytelling style that wavers between wry cynicism and twee romanticism.

American muscle-head Taylor Kitsch (Battleship, John Carter) loses some of that action hero bulk to play Dr Paul Lewis, but he still looks out of place in a small fishing village where he is forced to act as Gp after getting caught with cocaine at customs. Just the name, Tickle Cove, is enough to conjure a picture of seaside tranquillity, but on the contrary, the fishing business has dried up and its residents need to find an alternative source of revenue
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

‘The Grand Seduction’ is a charmer that’s fishing for quirky bait

The Grand Seduction

Starring Brendan Gleeson, Taylor Kitsch, Liane Balaban, Gordon Pinsent, Mark Critch

Directed by Don McKellar

Written by Michael Dowse and Ken Scott

Canada, 2014

One has to acquire a taste for eccentric dramedies that are populated by infectious quirky characters, a far-fetching premise, gentle-minded absurdity and an appreciation for the small-scale cinema experience to embrace the giddy gumption of director Don McKellar’s odd yet highly-spirited The Grand Seduction. Breezy, mildly confusing and charmingly off-kilter The Grand Seduction is an English-language Canadian film that tickles the funnybone in its cheeky conviction detailing the desperate economical times of a financially-strapped Newfoundland fishing village.

Now American television audiences in particular may inevitably view the witty Seduction as a knockoff to the critically-acclaimed early 1990′s series Northern Exposure where the off-base, fish-out-of-the-water quirks and kooky culture shock of revolving personalities co-existing in a quaint scenic hamlet may seem grudgingly familiar. Well
See full article at SoundOnSight »

HollywoodChicago.com Hookup: 75 Pairs of Passes to ‘The Grand Seduction’ With Taylor Kitsch

Chicago – In the latest HollywoodChicago.com Hookup: Film, we have 75 pairs of advance-screening movie passes up for grabs to the new comedy “The Grand Seduction” starring Taylor Kitsch and Brendan Gleeson!

The Grand Seduction,” which is rated “PG-13” and opens in Chicago on June 13, 2014, also stars Liane Balaban, Gordon Pinsent, Anna Hopkins, Rhonda Rodgers, Carly Boone, Mark Critch, Steve O’Connell and Matt Watts from director Don McKellar and writers Michael Dowse and Ken Scott.

To win your free “The Grand Seduction” passes courtesy of HollywoodChicago.com, just get interactive with our social media widget below. That’s it! This screening is on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 7 p.m. in Chicago. The more social actions you complete, the more points you score and the higher yours odds of winning! Completing these social actions only increases your odds of winning; this doesn’t intensify your competition!

Preferably, use your computer to enter rather than your smartphone.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Director Don McKellar Talks The Grand Seduction, Drawing on the Amazing Landscape, Authenticity of the Locals, and What the Cast Brought to the Film

In Don McKellar’s charming character-driven comedy, The Grand Seduction, a small Newfoundland fishing village facing hard times pulls out all the stops to find a town doctor needed to land a lucrative factory contract that would mean jobs for everyone. Long-time resident Murray French (Brendan Gleeson) comes up with a scheme to seduce a big city doctor (Taylor Kitsch) into staying after he arrives for his one month trial residence. Opening May 30th, the film is directed from a screenplay by Mike Dowse and Ken Scott and features a terrific cast that includes Gordon Pinsent, Mark Critch and Mary Walsh. In an exclusive interview, McKellar talked about the appeal of the script, what the cast brought to the film, the challenge of finding the right tone, how D.P. Doug Koch and Production Designer Guy Lalande drew on the amazing landscape to create the distinct look of the film,
See full article at Collider.com »

The Grand Seduction Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Grand Seduction Movie Review
Title: The Grand Seduction Entertainment One Reviewed for Shockya by Harvey Karten. Data-based on Rotten Tomatoes Grade: A- Director: Don McKellar Screenplay: Ken Scott, Michael Dowse Cast: Brendan Gleeson, Taylor Kitsch, Liane Balaban, Gordon Pinsent, Anna Hopkins, Rhonda Rodgers Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 4/29/14 Opens: May 30, 2014 Except for a few idealistic souls, doctors locate where the money is. There are so many of these white-coated professionals on the Upper East Side of Manhattan that you wonder why you’re about the only person you know who never draped a stethoscope prominently about your neck. Ok, maybe a number of physicians locate in simple, middle-income suburbs rather than Beverly Hills [ Read More ]

The post The Grand Seduction Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Watch: First Trailer For Don McKellar's 'The Grand Seduction' Starring Taylor Kitsch & Brendan Gleeson

If you are a member of the Brendan Gleeson fan club (and really, who isn’t?), then this summer should be a blast for you. While you are most likely aware of his upcoming film “Calvary,” which premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival to solid buzz and comes out this August, you may be surprised to learn that he co-stars in yet another comedy this year. That film would be “The Grand Seduction,” which finds Gleeson starring alongside Taylor Kitsch. And a new trailer has arrived.This indie comedy from Canada takes place in a fictional town in Newfoundland, where the townspeople are looking for a doctor who will take permanent residence so that they can obtain a contract in order to build a new factory. Taylor Kitsch plays the doctor and Gleeson is a resident of the village who leads the campaign. The rest of the cast includes Gordon Pinsent,
See full article at The Playlist »

Deception & Comedy In ‘The Grand Seduction’ Trailer Starring Brendan Gleeson

It’s been a while since we saw such a darling little comedy as this one. Set in a tiny village, the townsfolk must convince a new doctor to stay in order for a business contract to go through. What follows is a series of comedic attempts to help the doctor feel welcome which will ultimately end up in more jobs for the village. The whole idea of a town getting together in order to deceive reminds me of the likes of Waking Ned and The Englishman Who Went Up A Hill But Came Down A Mountain, also The Wicker-man.

Although there isn’t much subtlety here, the trailer certainly had me laughing at all the right spots. Brendan Gleeson stars as the one man on the island who seems capable of getting things done, while Taylor Kitsch takes a different approach to his blockbusting duds John Carter and Battleship.
See full article at The Hollywood News »
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