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TCM goes to war on Memorial Day: But thorny issues mostly avoided

Submarine movie evening: Underwater war waged in TCM's Memorial Day films In the U.S., Turner Classic Movies has gone all red, white, and blue this 2017 Memorial Day weekend, presenting a few dozen Hollywood movies set during some of the numerous wars in which the U.S. has been involved around the globe during the last century or so. On Memorial Day proper, TCM is offering a submarine movie evening. More on that further below. But first it's good to remember that although war has, to put it mildly, serious consequences for all involved, it can be particularly brutal on civilians – whether male or female; young or old; saintly or devilish; no matter the nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other label used in order to, figuratively or literally, split apart human beings. Just this past Sunday, the Pentagon chief announced that civilian deaths should be anticipated as “a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movie Poster of the Week: Frank Sinatra in Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Italian 4-foglio for The Joker is Wild (Charles Vidor, USA, 1957). Art by Enzo Nistri.Frank Sinatra, arguably the most important entertainer of the 20th century, was born 100 years ago today. I’ve become a little obsessed with him over the past week after watching Alex Gibney’s terrific 2-part, 4-hour HBO portrait Sinatra: All or Nothing at All. This of course got me thinking about Frank in movie posters, and I realized that I could barely come up with images of Sinatra posters in my head. While his best album covers are indelible and iconic, his movie posters tend to be less so. Scrolling through his filmography I realized that part of the problem is that his greatest films—On the Town, From Here to Eternity, Guys and Dolls, Some Came Running, Ocean’s 11—were almost always ensemble films in which Sinatra was never the standalone star, and so
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: Frank Sinatra in Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Italian 4-foglio for The Joker is Wild (Charles Vidor, USA, 1957). Art by Enzo Nistri.Frank Sinatra, arguably the most important entertainer of the 20th century, was born 100 years ago today. I’ve become a little obsessed with him over the past week after watching Alex Gibney’s terrific 2-part, 4-hour HBO portrait Sinatra: All or Nothing at All. This of course got me thinking about Frank in movie posters, and I realized that I could barely come up with images of Sinatra posters in my head. While his best album covers are indelible and iconic, his movie posters tend to be less so. Scrolling through his filmography I realized that part of the problem is that his greatest films—On the Town, From Here to Eternity, Guys and Dolls, Some Came Running, Ocean’s 11—were almost always ensemble films in which Sinatra was never the standalone star, and so
See full article at MUBI »

Thieves’ Highway

(Region B)  It's just like the film industry, I tell ya!  Director Jules Dassin teams with writer A.I. Bezzerides for one of filmdom's strongest slams at the free market system. Trucker Richard Conte fights back when cheated and robbed by Lee J. Cobb's racketeering produce czar. Thieves' Highway Region B Blu-ray + Pal DVD Arrow Video (UK) 1949 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 94 min. / Street Date October 20, 2015 / Available at Amazon UK / £14.99 Starring Richard Conte, Valentina Cortese, Lee J. Cobb, Barbara Lawrence, Jack Oakie, Millard Mitchell, Joseph Pevney, Morris Carnovsky Cinematography Norbert Brodine Art Direction Chester Gore, Lyle Wheeler Film Editor Nick DeMaggio Original Music Alfred Newman Written by A.I. Bezzerides from his novel Thieves' Market Produced by Robert Bassler Directed by Jules Dassin

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Did Jules Dassin initiate his string of studio produced films noirs, each of which has a strong element of social criticism, if not outright condemnation of 'the system?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Thieves’ Highway’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Academy)

Stars: Richard Conte, Valentina Cortese, Lee J. Cobb, Barbara Lawrence, Jack Oakie, Millard Mitchell, Joseph Pevney, Morris Carnovsky, Tamara Shayne | Written by A.I. Bezzerides | Directed by Jules Dassin

Jules Dassin’s Thieves’ Highway was released at a time when Noir was going strong, and fits the mould of what is expected of the genre. In truth though, it is something much different and much more human, providing the audience with an insight into the dirty tricks of market life controlled by mobsters.

In this Arrow Academy release we are introduced to A.I. Bezzerides world of crooks and fall guys where the nice guy is normally the fall guy. In this case Richard Conte plays Nick Garcos a soldier returning from the war to find his father crippled by mobster Mike Figlia (Lee J. Cobb) in a deal gone wrong. Looking for revenge Garcos sources some apples, taking them to the
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Movie Poster of the Week: “The Private Life of Henry VIII” and Charles Laughton in Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Us three-sheet poster for The Private Life of Henry VIII (Alexander Korda, UK, 1933).

The great Charles Laughton may not have been the prettiest of movie stars, but he had a presence that many matinee idols would have killed for (as the current retrospective running at Film Forum will attest). In an era in which glamor was everything, studio marketers may have struggled with how to present Laughton’s unconventional looks and his larger-than-life portrayals of larger-than-life characters (so many monsters, murderers, tyrants, or simply overbearing fathers) to the public. In most of the posters for his most famous film, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), he is all but a silhouette, a spoiler alert to his monstrous transformation as Quasimodo. And in some posters for The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933), the film for which he won his first Oscar, Henry is made to look more like the Hans Holbein
See full article at MUBI »

Turner Classic Movies Garner Tribute Next Monday

James Garner movies on TCM: ‘Grand Prix,’ ‘Victor Victoria’ among highlights (photo: James Garner ca. 1960) James Garner, whose film and television career spanned more than five decades, died of "natural causes" at age 86 on July 19, 2014, in the Los Angeles suburb of Brentwood. On Monday, July 28, Turner Classic Movies will present an all-day marathon of James Garner movies (see below) as a tribute to the Oscar-nominated star of Murphy’s Romance and Emmy-winning star of the television series The Rockford Files. Among the highlights in TCM’s James Garner film lineup is John Frankenheimer’s Monaco-set Grand Prix (1966), an all-star, race-car drama featuring Garner as a Formula One driver who has an affair with the wife (Jessica Walter) of his former teammate (Brian Bedford). Among the other Grand Prix drivers facing their own personal issues are Yves Montand and Antonio Sabato, while Akira Kurosawa’s (male) muse Toshiro Mifune plays a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Search: The Complete Series Available From Warner Archive Collection

The Warner Archive Collection is really starting to put out some great DVDs that feature titles you aren’t going to find anywhere else, and the latest to be made available is Search. A massively fun show from the early 70s, Search starred Hugh O’Brian, Doug McClure, and Tony Franciosa, and was (although I’m testing my memory) a show that pulled great tech ideas into the espionage drama realm, at a point when some of the ideas were practically sci-fi.

The complete series is available now, and it’s a lost classic that deserves a look. Unfortunately, it’s hard to get a taste of it to know if you’re interested in buying, but for those who remember the series, this is a real treat.

Catch the full info below, and don’t let this one escape your notice.

Look no further: You can now find Search
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Kerr's Biggest Box-Office Hit: Musical About Romance and Racism During WWII

Kerr in the 1958 box-office blockbuster musical South Pacific (seen above with love interest France Nuyen) and his (few) other post-Tea and Sympathy efforts [Please check out the previous article: "The Two Kerrs in the stage and film versions of Tea and Sympathy."] Director Curtis Bernhardt's Gaby (1956) was a generally disliked remake of Waterloo Bridge, with Kerr and leading lady Leslie Caron in the old Robert Taylor and Vivien Leigh roles (1940 movie version -- and even older Douglass Montgomery and Mae Clarke roles in the 1931 film version). Jeffrey Hayden's The Vintage (1957), starring Kerr and Mel Ferrer absurdly cast as Italian brothers, also failed to generate much box-office or critical interest. MGM leading lady Pier Angeli played Ferrer's love interest in the film, while the more mature and married French star Michèle Morgan (a plot element similar to that found in Tea and Sympathy) is Kerr's object of desire. (Pictured above: South Pacific cast members John Kerr and France Nuyen embracing.) Also in the mid-'50s, John Kerr
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Debbie Reynolds Movie Schedule: Singin' In The Rain, Divorce American Style

Jean Hagen, Debbie Reynolds, Singin' in the Rain Debbie Reynolds on TCM: The Unsinkable Molly Brown, The Singing Nun Schedule (Et) and synopses from the TCM website: 6:00 Am The Affairs Of Dobie Gillis (1953) A lovesick teenager searches for romance at college. Dir: Don Weis. Cast: Debbie Reynolds, Bobby Van, Barbara Ruick. Bw-73 mins. 7:15 Am I Love Melvin (1953) A photographer's assistant promises to turn a chorus girl into a cover girl. Dir: Don Weis. Cast: Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Una Merkel. C-77 mins. 8:45 Am The Tender Trap (1955) A swinging bachelor finds love when he meets a girl immune to his line. Dir: Charles Walters. Cast: Frank Sinatra, Debbie Reynolds, David Wayne. C-111 mins, Letterbox Format. 10:45 Am Bundle Of Joy (1956) A shop girl is mistaken for the mother of a foundling. Dir: Norman Taurog. Cast: Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, Adolphe Menjou. C-98 mins. 12:30 Pm Tammy And The Bachelor
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Leslie Nielsen Dies: The Naked Gun, Forbidden Planet, The Golden Girls Superlover

  When most people think of Leslie Nielsen, they think of spoofs such as Airplane! (1980), The Naked Gun (1988), Dracula: Dead and Loving It (1995), and Wrongfully Accused (1998). Perhaps a little strangely, when I think of Leslie Nielsen, who died at the age of 84 from complications of pneumonia at a Ft. Lauderdale hospital on Sunday, the first thing that comes to mind is the older guy Debbie Reynolds pines for in Joseph Pevney's Tammy and the Bachelor (1957). It's while daydreaming of Nielsen that Reynolds sings Ray Evans and Jay Livingston's ballad "Tammy." Don't laugh. It's actually a charming romantic song. Else, I think of the spaceship commander J. J. Adams in Fred M. Wilcox's 1956 sci-fi classic Forbidden Planet, which features Walter Pidgeon as the off-kilter Dr. Edward Morbius, Anne Francis in a skimpy mini-skirt, Robby the Robot, and a still very much relevant message about the seeds [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

R.I.P. 2008: A Rough Year For Hollywood

For me, the only part of the Oscars worth watching every year is their tribute video, highlighting those in the movie industry that passed away in the previous year. It always puts a lump in my throat and often surprises me due to the passing of people I hadn’t heard about. And with the actors who were popular decades ago, it gives me a sense of melancholy nostalgia.

TCM (Turner Classic Movies) has put together their version of a tribute video which you can watch below, and it gave me the same feelings I just mentioned (I wasn’t aware they do one every year). It’s a beautiful video and very classy. They did miss a couple of people which I mention below.

I would suggest you watch the video before moving on to the list of names below it. It includes actors, directors, composers, screenwriters, animators, etc.
See full article at Screen Rant »

DVD Releases: Dreaming of Cannibal Goddess

Sorry it's so late, folks, but there's lots of horror DVDs to choose from coming your way this Tuesday, June 24th, so I hope you’ve been saving your cash!

Cannibal Terror (1980)

Directed by Alain Deruelle

One of the original Video Nasties! This French/Spanish co-production follow a pair of idiotic thieves and their large-breasted accomplice as they kidnap the daughter of a local tycoon and decide that the cannibal-infested jungle is the best hiding spot. True, no one would look for them there! Pretty soon they’re either being eaten alive or trying to escape from being eaten alive. Buy it here!!

The Chilling (1989)

Directed by Deland Nuse & Jack A. Sunseri

Now, I can see the benefits of having a cryogenics lab, freezing bodies to preserve them and bring them back when a cure is found for whatever is making them sick, but you’d hope they’d have
See full article at Dread Central »

Star Trek Director Dead

Star Trek Director Dead
The man behind some of Star Trek's most beloved episodes has died in Palm Desert, California.

Joseph Pevney, a former Broadway star and 1940s actor, died of age-related causes on 18 May. He was 96.

After directing movies like Man of A Thousand Faces, Pevney turned his attention to TV work and directed episodes of popular series like The Munsters, The Fugitive, The Incredible Hulk and Fantasy Island, among others.

But it was the 14 episodes of Star Trek he directed that made him beloved of Trekkers. Pevney shares the record of the mostcredited Star Trek episode director with Marc Daniels.

He is most famous for taking charge of Star Trek's first fullcomedy episode The Trouble With Tribbles.

As a film director, Pevney also is credited for Frank Sinatra's Meet Danny Wilson and 3 Ring Circus, which featured comedy doubleact Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin.

Popular 'Star Trek' Director Joseph Pevney Dies

Joseph Pevney, the director who brought to screen including the famous "Star Trek" episode "The Trouble With Tribbles," has died. He was 96. Pevney directed a number of "Star Trek" episodes beginning with "Arena" that aired in January 1967. He would also direct "The Return of the Archons," "A Taste of Armageddon," "The Devil in the Dark," "The City on the Edge of Forever," "Amok Time," "The Apple," "Catspaw," "Journey to Babel," "Friday's Child," "The Deadly Years," "Wolf in in the Fold" and "The Immunity Syndrome." Pevney's "Trouble With Tribbles" episode would be resurrected in 1996 in a special anniversary episode of "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" called "Trials and Tribble-ations." His first directing job was 1950's "Shakedown," an early movie work ...
See full article at GeekNation »

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