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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2014


Antonin Baudry and Bertrand Tavernier in conversation on Weapons of Mass Diplomacy and The French Minister (Quai d’Orsay)

3 July 2014 2:21 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Edmund White and Frank Rich with Antonin Baudry at Quai d’Orsay - Weapons of Mass Diplomacy Drawing The Line at McNally Jackson in New York: "I remember it was really like being in film school."

Bertrand Tavernier's The French Minister (Quai D’Orsay) stars Thierry Lhermitte, Raphaël Personnaz, Niels Arestrup and Anaïs Demoustier, with Jane Birkin impersonating a version of Toni Morrison and Julie Gayet as a potent advisor.

Eric Rohmer, Jean-Luc Godard and going beyond Mel Brooks with Frankenstein and the Seven Dwarfs are discussed in the second half of my conversation with Bertrand Tavernier and Antonin Baudry.

At McNally Jackson Books in New York, two days before July 4, Edmund White and Frank Rich were discussing Drawing The Line with Antonin Baudry. Here is a highlight.

Weapons of Mass Diplomacy Drawing The Line invitation

Anne-Katrin Titze: The past times we spoke, Bertrand Tavernier was always in the room. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Antonin Baudry and Bertrand Tavernier in conversation on Weapons of Mass Diplomacy and The French Minister (Quai d’Orsay)

29 June 2014 11:55 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Antonin Baudry with Bertrand Tavernier on The French Minister (Quai d’Orsay): "I fell in love immediately with Antonin's book, because it was dealing with politics in, for me, the best way possible." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

I met up in New York with Bertrand Tavernier and Antonin Baudry, who co-wrote the screenplay for The French Minister (Quai d’Orsay), based on Baudry's (aka Abel Lanzac) autobiographic graphic novel about his adventures as a speech writer in the French Ministry. The film stars Thierry Lhermitte, Raphaël Personnaz and Niels Arestrup who at times seem to channel the working methods of Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday or the serious madness surrounding Peter Sellers in The Party. Howard Hawks, Billy Wilder, Blake Edwards, Jacques Becker, Stanley Kubrick and John Ford pop up in precise reference throughout the conversation.

Thierry Lhermitte as Alexandre Taillard de Worms with Raphaël Personnaz »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Rendez-Vous With French Cinema In The UK This April

15 April 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Whether you’re already a fan of world cinema or looking to expand your film horizons, the 2014 edition of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema is a must.

And what’s even better is that this year’s event isn’t just in London. Instead you can experience a little bit of France in various venues across the UK, including Bristol’s Watershed, Nottingham’s Broadway and Cambridge’s Arts Picturehouse.

So what’s lined up for 2014? Well, there’s a mixture of brand new cinema and restored classics for you to choose from.

Perhaps Albert Dupontel’s César Award winning comedy 9 Month Stretch will ignite your enthusiasm. Or maybe you’ll go for Agnes B’s directorial début My Name Is Hmmm… or Martin Provost’s literary biopic Violette. Internationally known director Jean-Pierre Jeunet (AMÉLIE, City Of Lost Children, Alien Resurrection) is also represented at the event with The Young And Prodigious T.S. Spivet. »

- Claire Joanne Huxham

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Exclusive: Politicians Are Hard At Work Or Hardly Working In Clip From Bertrand Tavernier's 'The French Minister'

21 March 2014 7:01 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Acclaimed French filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier has taken audiences everywhere, from the world of American jazz ("Round Midnight") to the drama of the 16th century ("The Princess Of Montpensier"), and his latest finds a new world, behind the closed doors of the political sphere, and in the comedic "The French Minister," no one is spared. Starring Thierry Lhermitte, Raphaël Personnaz, Niels Arestrup, Bruno Raffaelli, Julie Gayet and Anaïs Demoustier, the film tells the story of the fictional Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexandre Taillard de Vorms, who juggles American neo-cons, corrupt Russians and the opportunistic Chinese all while his useless speech writer tries to keep up with the whirling dervish of personalities around him. In this exclusive clip, we see how things can turn on a dime in the political world. "The French Minister" opens today in limited release and is available on VOD. Watch below. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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If You Haven't Heard of French Director Bertrand Tavernier, Here's a Good Place to Start

20 March 2014 8:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Bertrand Tavernier’s "The French Minister" reaches America this Friday 40 years after his feature debut, 1974's "The Clockmaker." At 72, Tavernier shows no signs of slowing his eclectic experimentation: the film marks his first attempt at straight-up comedy and opened strong in France, though cumulative admissions at home didn’t eclipse 2010's vigorous medieval adventure "The Princess Of Montpensier" or 2008's New Orleans-set, Tommy Lee Jones-starring mystery "In The Electric Mist," three films that are a representative sampling of Tavernier’s genre-sampling career. The original title for "The French Minister" is "Quai D'Orsay," the Paris wharf where the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is located. Enter cautiously idealistic Arthur Vlaminck (Raphaël Personnaz), hired as speechwriter to minister Alexandre Taillard de Vorms (Thierry Lhermitte). Taillard is a nearly-literal whirlwind, whose door-slamming entries and exits send papers flying into brief tornadic spirals within a »

- Vadim Rizov

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The Very Funny The French Minister Is All Politics and Zero Ideology

18 March 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

Armando Iannucci’s comedies Veep and The Thick of It are all politics, zero ideology, except where someone’s ideological posture affects the ambitions of other characters. The French Minister, directed by Bertrand Tavernier, based on the graphic novel Quai d'Orsay, by Abel Lanzac and Christophe Blain, adopts a similar posture, focused on the survival tactics of an exhausted ministry staff against the hurricane effects of a single enormous personality: Alexandre Taillard de Worms, the French minister of foreign affairs (Thierry Lhermitte). Seen through the perspective of new hire Arthur (Raphaël Personnaz), the silver-maned de Worms is mercurial and hugely charismatic. A speechwriter, Arthur struggles to accommodate the editorial impe »

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Interview with Bertrand Tavernier about Quai D'Orsay

13 March 2014 8:16 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Niels Arestrup to Bertrand Tavernier on Claude Maupas in Quai D'Orsay: "You ask me to play a very introverted, soft spoken guy and I am the opposite." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Bertrand Tavernier's The French Minister (Quai D’Orsay) starring Thierry Lhermitte, Raphaël Personnaz, Niels Arestrup and Anaïs Demoustier, with Jane Birkin impersonating a version of Toni Morrison and Julie Gayet as a potent advisor, is the closing night film of New York's Rendez-Vous with French Cinema.

We discussed the importance of rhythm for his film, how Billy Wilder and Jacques Becker set a mood, the working relationship with writers Christophe Blain and Cultural Counselor to the French Embassy Antonin Baudry, Arestrup's dedication, and the decision to not watch films when making one. Tavernier also gave me insight into how he created the unequaled complexity of character with Philippe Noiret and Isabelle Huppert in Coup De Torchon.

"A fool »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Article about the Rendez-Vous with French Cinema in New York

4 March 2014 1:37 PM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Bertrand Tavernier on The French Minister (Quai d’Orsay): "I tell them not to play it as comedy and it will be funny." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The opening night of Rendez-Vous with French Cinema in New York at the Paris Theatre will bring us Catherine Deneuve's exceptional performance in Emmanuelle Bercot's On My Way. Bertrand Tavernier's wildly diplomatic The French Minister (Quai D’Orsay), based on Antonin Baudry’s graphic novels, starring Raphaël Personnaz, Thierry Lhermitte with Julie Gayet, Jane Birkin and Niels Arestrup closes the festival. Mathieu Amalric and Emmanuelle Devos in If You Don't, I Will (Arrête Ou Je Continue) directed by Sophie Fillières, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Yvan Attal in Michel Spinosa's His Wife (Son Épouse), Katell Quillévéré's Suzanne with Sara Forestier, François Damiens, Adèle Haenel and Paul Hamy are some of the other highlights of UniFrance and the Film Society of »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Adele leads France's Lumière Awards

20 January 2014 3:01 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Kechiche’s Adele wins best film and best director. Best francophone, foreign film goes to Ayouch’s Horses Of God.

Abdellatif Kechiche’s Adele: Chapters 1 & 2 (aka Blue is the Warmest Colour) was the top winner at the Lumière Awards, France’s version of the Golden Globes judged by the international press community in Paris, on Monday evening (20).

Kechiche’s passionate lesbian love story, which has ignited the public and critics at home and abroad, clinched best film and best director. 

The special jury prize went to Rebecca Zlotowski’s gritty romance Grand Central, set against the backdrop of a nuclear power station.

Other titles in the running for best film included 9-Month Stretch, Grand Central, Mood Indigo, Quai d’Orsay and Renoir.

The previous two winners of best film at the Lumières, The Artist and Amour, went on to triumph at the Oscars. Adele, however, was not submitted for Academy Awards consideration. France instead »

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French Lumières fall for Adele

20 January 2014 3:01 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Kechiche’s Adele wins best film and best director. Best francophone, foreign film goes to Ayouch’s Horses Of God.

Abdellatif Kechiche’s Adele: Chapters 1 & 2 was the top winner at the Lumière Awards, France’s version of the Golden Globes judged by the international press community in Paris, on Monday evening (20).

Kechiche’s passionate lesbian love story, which has ignited the public and critics at home and abroad, clinched best film and best director. 

The special jury prize went to Rebecca Zlotowski’s gritty romance Grand Central, set against the backdrop of a nuclear power station.

Other titles in the running for best film included 9-Month Stretch, Grand Central, Mood Indigo, Quai d’Orsay and Renoir.

The previous two winners of best film at the Lumières, The Artist and Amour, went on to triumph at the Oscars. Adele, however, was not submitted for Academy Awards consideration. France instead put Renoir forward this year.

In other prizes »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010

10 items from 2014


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