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The Jungle Book 2 Will Use Abandoned Ideas From Original Animated Movie

Disney’s live-action remake of their classic animated movie The Jungle Book turned out to be a raging success when it hit theaters in 2016, skirting a $1 billion dollar box office gross and winning the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects. It’s no surprise, then, that the House of Mouse is working on a sequel.

Luckily for the filmmakers, there’s some material to mine when it comes to finding a new story to fuel a second outing. The first movie was based on Rudyard Kipling’s classic of the same name and it just so happens that the author also wrote a follow-up, The Second Jungle Book, which has rarely been brought to the screen.

It also turns out that the sequel will look to deleted scenes and ideas from the 1967 animated movie for inspiration. Screenwriter Justin Marks spoke at the TCA press tour recently and explained how he
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Jon Favreau's The Jungle Book 2 is Being Developed From Unused Ideas From The Animated Film

Director Jon Favreau and writer Justin Marks are currently in the process of developing the script for The Jungle Book 2 for Disney. During a recent interview with /Film, Marks offered up some details on where they are getting their ideas for the sequel. One of the cool things that he reveals is that they dove into the Disney archives and pulled out a bunch of unused ideas for the original 1967 animated film and they are going to implement them into their story. Those ideas come from a script that Walt Disney rejected.

"In the second film, the idea is to go further through the Kipling but also go into some of the Disney resources from the ’67 film that maybe didn’t get to see the light of day in the first film. If you look back to Bill Peet’s work on the original film, some of which was thrown out by Walt Disney,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The Jungle Book 2 Further Explores the Original Book

It wasn't terribly surprising when Disney revealed they were planning The Jungle Book 2, with the sequel in development just days before The Jungle Book hit theaters. The Jungle Book would go on to be one of the biggest box office hit in 2016, bringing in $364 million domestic and $966.5 million worldwide, from a $180 million budget. While promoting his new Starz TV series Counterpart, screenwriter Justin Marks shed some new light on this sequel. Here's what the writer had to say about how this sequel will continue to explore other aspects of the Rudyard Kipling novel.

"In the second film, the idea is to go further through the Kipling but also go into some of the Disney resources from the '67 film that maybe didn't get to see the light of day in the first film. If you look back to Bill Peet's work on the original film, some of which
See full article at MovieWeb »

'Game of Thrones' Writer to Pen Live-Action 'Sword in the Stone'

'Game of Thrones' Writer to Pen Live-Action 'Sword in the Stone'
Disney has added yet another beloved cartoon classic to its roster of upcoming live-action remakes: The Sword in the Stone.

Variety reports that Game of Thrones writer Bryan Cogman will pen the updated take on the 1963 film. Originally written by Bill Peet — and based on T. H. White's book of the same name — The Sword in the Stone told King Arthur's fictionalized origin story as an orphan who proves himself worthy of royalty as he does the impossible by pulling a sword from a stone.

Cogman has written seven
See full article at Rolling Stone »

101 Dalmatians Gets Diamond Edition Treatment in February

  • Comicmix
Pick your favorite spot to watch—anytime and anywhere—and get ready for a fun-filled adventure with the Diamond Edition of 101 Dalmatians! Pongo, Perdita and their super-adorable puppies are in for thrills, hilarious spills and an epic action-packed adventure when they face off with Cruella De Vil, Disney’s most fabulously outrageous villainess. When Cruella dognaps all of the Dalmatian puppies in London, brave animal heroes launch a daring plan to save all puppies from Cruella’s clutches! Unleash all the excitement and suspense of Disney’s 101 Dalmatians, a beloved classic you’ll want to share with your family again and again!

Cast: Rod Taylor (Inglorious Bastards, The Birds) as Pongo, J. Pat O’Malley (The Jungle Book, Alice in Wonderland) as Jasper and Betty Lou Gerson (The Fly, Cats Don’t Dance) as Cruella de Vil

Producer: Walt Disney

Directors: Wolfgang Reitherman, Hamilton S. Luske and Clyde Geronimi

Writers: Story by Bill Peet.
See full article at Comicmix »

Ben Kingsley To Voice Bagheera In New Jungle Book Feature

Academy Award-winning actor Ben Kingsley has been cast as the voice of Bagheera in Disney’s upcoming The Jungle Book.

Directed by Jon Favreau from a script by Justin Marks, The Jungle Book combines live action and animated filmmaking.

The film arrives in theaters in 3D on October 9, 2015.

From Wikipedia:

Inspired by the Rudyard Kipling’s book of the same name, it is the 19th animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman, it was the last to be produced by Walt Disney, who died during its production. The plot follows Mowgli, a feral child raised in the Indian jungle by wolves, as his friends Bagheera the panther and Baloo the bear try to convince him into leaving the jungle before the evil tiger Shere Khan arrives.

The early versions of both the screenplay and the soundtrack followed Kipling’s work more closely, with a dramatic,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Maleficent | Review

Director: Robert Stromberg Writers: Linda Woolverton (screenplay), Charles Perrault (story), Jacob Grimm (story), Wilhelm Grimm (story), Erdman Penner (screenplay Sleeping Beauty 1959), Joe Rinaldi (screenplay Sleeping Beauty 1959), Winston Hibler (screenplay Sleeping Beauty 1959), Bill Peet (screenplay Sleeping Beauty 1959), Ted Sears (screenplay Sleeping Beauty 1959), Ralph Wright (screenplay Sleeping Beauty1959), Milt Banta (screenplay Sleeping Beauty 1959) Starring: Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley, Imelda Staunton, Lesley Manville, Juno Temple, Sam Riley, Brenton Thwaites Maleficent is not a […]
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

‘The Jungle Book’ and Racism in Disney’s Animated Features

The release of The Jungle Book on Blu-ray today has become, as when Saving Mr. Banks was unveiled a couple months ago, an unplanned forum on a most thorny issue for the Disney uber-fan: was Walt Disney a racist/sexist/anti-Semite, and if so, was he a super-racist/sexist/anti-Semite, or just your average, garden-variety racist/sexist/anti-Semite? Even though the 1967 animated film based loosely on a collection of stories by Rudyard Kipling opened months after Disney passed away, this was the last film on which he had any serious impact. And, since Meryl Streep chose to make her speech applauding Emma Thompson for her performance as P.L. Travers in Saving Mr. Banks as much about exactly how bad a man Walt Disney was, the issue of his true personal feelings–whatever those may have been–and whether or not they crept into the films he made has become unavoidable as of late.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

How we made The Jungle Book

The voice of Mowgli and the storyman behind the beloved 1967 animation recall the difficulties of pleasing Walt Disney

Bruce Reitherman, Mowgli

I was 11 and my dad, Wolfgang Reitherman, was the director so it didn't take much for him to see me on the sofa at home and have his lightbulb casting moment. I was the voice of Christopher Robin when I was six but had no other acting experience. I just sounded like an ordinary kid.

The makers wanted someone who sounded very innocent to play Mowgli, to soften the parts where, thanks to his lines, he might come across as a petulant teenager. But in the 1960s, it took four years to make an animated film – so if you cast a kid and didn't get to the cutting room quick enough, you'd end up with an adolescent. And sure enough, the first Mowgli had had to be replaced after his voice broke.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

How we made The Jungle Book

The voice of Mowgli and the storyman behind the beloved 1967 animation recall the difficulties of pleasing Walt Disney

Bruce Reitherman, Mowgli

I was 11 and my dad, Wolfgang Reitherman, was the director so it didn't take much for him to see me on the sofa at home and have his lightbulb casting moment. I was the voice of Christopher Robin when I was six but had no other acting experience. I just sounded like an ordinary kid.

The makers wanted someone who sounded very innocent to play Mowgli, to soften the parts where, thanks to his lines, he might come across as a petulant teenager. But in the 1960s, it took four years to make an animated film – so if you cast a kid and didn't get to the cutting room quick enough, you'd end up with an adolescent. And sure enough, the first Mowgli had had to be replaced after his voice broke.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Disney Classics Double Feature Part II: The Jungle Book

Throughout the year, Thn will look at 53 Walt Disney Animated Classics, from Snow White to Wreck-it Ralph, through the obscurity of Fun And Fancy Free to the second Golden Age of Beauty And The Beast. These are the films the Walt Disney company are most proud of, the ones that hold a special place in our hearts, the ones that still cost a fortune to buy on DVD.

In the second part of this week’s double hitter, we look for some bear necessities with The Jungle Book.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman

1967/ 78 minutes

The Jungle Book marked a return of sorts for Walt Disney; after only being partially involved in One Hundred And One Dalmatians and The Sword In The Stone, the latter’s disappointing performance led Disney to take a more active role in the film’s story. He threw out storyman Bill Peet’s original script, which closely
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney Classics Double Feature Part I: The Sword in The Stone

Throughout the year, Thn will look at 53 Walt Disney Animated Classics, from Snow White to Wreck-it Ralph, through the obscurity of Fun And Fancy Free to the second Golden Age of Beauty And The Beast. These are the films the Walt Disney company are most proud of, the ones that hold a special place in our hearts, the ones that still cost a fortune to buy on DVD.

This week it’s a double hitter, starting with The Sword In The Stone.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman

1963/ 79 minutes

Budget: $12 million

Based on the novel by T.H. White, itself based loosely upon Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, The Sword In The Stone is not a strictly faithful adaptation of either version of Arthurian legend. However, it keeps to the basic outline of King Arthur’s formative years, and White’s conviction that people are for the most part basically good,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Extended Thoughts on ‘Alice in Wonderland’

Alice in Wonderland

Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, and Hamilton Luske

Written by Winston Hibler, Ted Sears, Bill Peet, Erdman Penner, Joe Rinaldi, Milt Banta, Bill Cottrell, Dick Kelsey, Joe Grant, Dick Huemer, Del Connell, Tom Oreb, and John Waltridge

Starring Kathryn Beaumont, Ed Wynn, Verna Felton

I should not pride myself in my ability to not be bored stiff by black-and-white movies, or by a supposedly stilted style of acting present in films from before the 1960s. There is a perception in the world, though, that audiences under the age of 30—I’m nearing the precipice of being on the opposite side of that line, but not yet—are, for the most part, unable to deal with older films or engage with them properly. On one hand, I bristle at the stereotype, not just because of my love for film of any age, but because I know from writing for this website,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Extended Thoughts on ‘The Sword in the Stone’

The Sword in the Stone

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman

Written by Bill Peet

Starring Rickie Sorenson, Richard Reitherman, Robert Reitherman, Karl Swenson, Junius Matthews

How important is fidelity in a movie adaptation? And, more to the point, do you need to be familiar with the source material for a movie to get more enjoyment out of that film? I’ve considered these questions with previous movies covered on the show, and my overall opinion remains the same. A movie is a movie, and a book is a book (or play, or musical, or what have you). I wouldn’t say “never the twain shall meet,” but frankly, one story can and should be able to work in various media. Though it doesn’t often happen, we’ll sometimes see movies that are better than the books they’re based on. All too frequently, we find the cinematic adaptation is a letdown.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Extended Thoughts on ’101 Dalmatians’

101 Dalmatians

Directed by Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske, Wolfgang Reitherman

Written by Bill Peet

Starring Betty Lou Gerson, Rod Taylor, Ben Wright

One of the great ironies of xerography is that, while it was created to help cut costs for the animation arm of the Walt Disney Company, it was first used in a way that was, surprisingly, creatively ambitious. Xerography was a process that Ub Iwerks adopted for the use of animation in the late-1950s; it’s not really hyperbole to say that xerography saved animation at Walt Disney as we know it. If you’ve been listening to the show for a while, and reading these columns, don’t worry. I haven’t received a sharp blow to the head, nor has an alien replaced me. I can’t stand most of the xerographic films from Disney from the 1960s and 1970s. (There are exceptions, of course, but in general,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

[DVD Review] Walt Disney Animation Collection: Volume 6: The Reluctant Dragon

The sixth and final volume of the Disney Classic Short Films collection finally found a way to load a disc with cartoons of genuinely similar moral themes. While Mickey and the Beanstalk did well in that regard as far as plots are concerned, the cartoons accompanying The Reluctant Dragon all take a different stance on identity and what it means to measure expectations of who people think you should be against who you actually are. Each of the cartoons does this in its own way – some more deftly than others. While more consistently thematically, it’s also worth noting that the average age of the four cartoons in this set is noticeably lower than those in other volumes; where volumes 1-5 each had about 2-4 cartoons from the mid 1930s, this volume has but one – and its 1938 creation date gives it a stylistic leg up over its 1933/1934 brethren of past volumes.
See full article at JustPressPlay »

[DVD Review] Walt Disney Animation Collection: Volume 3: The Prince and the Pauper

The Disney Classic Short Films collection abounds with animation gems that have been wiling away the last few years. In the third installment of this collection, headlined by the more well-known The Prince and the Pauper, we get one the better animated features in the old Disney library. Accompanying the main cartoon we have five additional cartoons of starkly varied age, style and quality (more so than on the other sets).

The Prince and the Pauper (1990)

Directed by George Scribner, Written by Gerrit Graham and Sam Graham

Here we have one of the best Disney shorts to come of the pre-Pixar era. Created back in 1990, the animation here stands up to the test of time – in fact, seeing it for the first time in what must have been a decade, I was shocked at how beautiful it still looks. Based on the classic story by Mark Twain, it has all
See full article at JustPressPlay »

See also

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