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1-20 of 26 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in August

1 August 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Ah, August, that glorious month when summer officially overstays its welcome and everyone begins praying for a respite from the blistering temperatures. With kids staying home on summer break and working stiffs having already blown through their vacation days by mid-June, there's no better time for an extended hunker-down in the living room. Netflix teams with Baz Luhrmann for a frenetic new birth-of-hip-hop drama, David Cross gives his acerbic State of the Union address in a new special, and a recent Coen brothers masterpiece comes online. Top off that iced »

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Review: Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

18 July 2016 4:50 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

Once upon a time, a young film enthusiast was taken by Willis O’Brien’s work in King Kong and decided to devote his life to making fantastical films and memorable creatures that would be remembered for generations to come. This young man was Ray Harryhausen, and the newly released documentary by Gilles Penso, Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan showcases Harryhausen’s passions and the passions they inflamed and inspired in others, including such film personalities as Guillermo Del Toro, Steven Spielberg, Terry Gillian, John Landis, and Peter Jackson.

Recently released by Arrow video, the documentary is an obvious labor of love for all involved, as the interview subjects all seem very enthusiastic while discussing Harryhausen and his overlooked contribution to cinema, which has carried on a unique legacy with his use of stop motion animation and the often times ridiculously detailed puppets used to create countless characters and sequences »

- Derek Botelho

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Amazon Prime Day Deals: 18 Great Films And Television Shows To Buy Right Now

12 July 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Amazon Prime Day is here, and with it, a bevy of deals for your entertainment-loving heart. In order to plow through the massive list of deals being offered to Amazon Prime members — it is called Amazon Prime Day for a reason — we’ve narrowed down some of the many offerings for 18 tried and tested IndieWire favorites, spanning both film and television, available with some very special streaming deals today only. Take a look, and start saving now.

Edge of Tomorrow” ($0.99, 80% off)

In a summer full of lousy Hollywood fare, go back to 2014 and re-experience Doug Liman’s brilliant sci-fi romp. Written by master screenwriter Chris McQuarrie, “Edge of Tomorrow” pushes Tom Cruise to rock bottom and kills him off in the first 10 minutes. And then does it again, and again and a few dozen more times. Consider it a video game movie that doesn’t need video game source material to make it work, »

- Russell Goldman and Sarah Colvin

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Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

28 June 2016 8:19 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Release the Kraken! They're only now releasing this Blu-ray in the U.S.. The patron saint of every special effect fan gets the royal treatment in this career overview capped with industry testimonials and rare film items from a cache of 35mm outtakes found packed away in Rh's storeroom. Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Region B Blu-ray Arrow Video Us 2011 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 28, 2016 / 19.95 Starring Ray Harryhausen, Peter Jackson, Nick Park, Phil Tippet, Randy Cook, Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Tony Dalton, Dennis Muren, John Landis, Ray Bradbury, Ken Ralston, Martine Beswick, Vanessa Harryhausen, Caroline Munro, Guillermo del Toro, Joe Dante, John Lasseter, James Cameron, Steven Spielberg, Henry Selick. Original Music Alexandre Poncet Produced by Tony Dalton, Alexandre Poncet Written and Directed by Gilles Penso

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The time has long passed that Ray Harryhausen was merely a cult figure. By the release of Golden Voyage »

- Glenn Erickson

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Aardman talks next film 'Early Man', a new TV series and Vr

23 June 2016 5:54 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Aardman talked to Screen in Annecy about future projects - including the Eddie Redmayne-voiced Early Man - BFI support and learning curves.

Aardman Animations is the most successful animation company in British film history; its films have generated worldwide box office revenue of close to $1 billion and it is a cherished international brand.

Despite its global success, however, Aardman still considers itself to be a niche player in the ultra competitive Us animation market.

The contrast was acknowledged by Aardman founders Peter Lord and David Sproxton in an interview with Screen at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival last week.

Sproxton and Lord were in Annecy to give a keynote address, Aardman At 40, and to collect a “personality of the year award” from the festival.

Us giants

The company, which has worked closely with DreamWorks and Sony in the past, now finances its films in Europe, often on smaller budgets than those commanded by the Us »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Studiocanal Acquires Paddington Bear Brand, Plans Third Paddington Movie

20 June 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — Vivendi’s Studiocanal, Europe’s biggest film-tv production-distribution company, has acquired Paddington and Company and the Copyrights Group, two purchases that give Studiocanal full ownership of nearly all of the Paddington Bear brand worldwide.

The deal marks Studiocanal’s first acquisition of an iconic European intellectual property. It comes as Studiocanal and parent Vivendi have identified the ownership and exploitation of European properties, especially big, resonant European culture icons, as one of its cardinal growth strategies.

Studiocanal is also “committed” to a third Paddington movie, Studiocanal chairman-ceo Didier Lupfer said. “Paddington 2,” produced by David Heyman (“Harry Potter,” “Gravity”) and directed by Paul King, is gearing up to go into production in October, tracking for a late 2017 release.

Unveiled on Monday, the acquisition of Paddington and Company and the Copyrights Group gives Studiocanal filmed and TV usage of the classic children’s book character, as well as use of »

- John Hopewell and Elsa Keslassy

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The 50 Best Animated Films of the 21st Century Thus Far

16 June 2016 11:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There’s something inherently remarkable about the field of animation: that, with just a paper and pen, one can use infinite imagination to create a world unbound by physical restrictions. Of course, in today’s age it goes far beyond those simple tools of creation, but it remains the rare patience-requisite medium in which a director’s vision can be perfected over years until applying that final, necessary touch.

With Pixar’s 17th feature arriving in theaters, we’ve set out to reflect on the millennium thus far in animation and those films that have most excelled. In picking our 50 favorite titles, we looked to all corners of the world, from teams as big as thousands down to a sole animator. The result is a wide-ranging selection, proving that even if some animation styles aren’t as prevalent, the best examples find their way to the top.

To note: we only stuck with feature-length animations of 60 minutes or longer — sorry, World of Tomorrow, and even Pixar’s stunning Piper — and to make room for a few more titles, our definition of “the 21st century” stretched to include 2000. We also stuck with films that don’t feature any live-action (for the most part) and that have been released in the U.S. thus far, so The Red Turtle and Phantom Boy will get their due on a later date. Check out our top 50 below and let us know your favorites in the comments.

50. The Lego Movie (Phil Lord and Christopher Miller)

Admit it: When The Lego Movie was announced, you did not expect it to wind up any best-of-the-year lists. But, against all odds, Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s first smash hit of 2014 is an unadulterated pleasure. This bold, original film has a wildly clever script (by the directors) with a message of creativity that made it a glorious surprise. It is also well-cast: Lego is the first movie to fully make use of Chris Pratt’s essential sweetness, and offered Elizabeth Banks, Will Ferrell, Liam Neeson, and Morgan Freeman their freshest parts in years. It is not often that a “kids” film entertains adults as much as their children, but The Lego Movie is far more than a piece of entertainment for the young ones. What could have been a headache-inducing, cynical creation is instead a pop treat. Everything is, indeed, awesome. – Christopher Schobert

49. 5 Centimetres per Second (Makoto Shinkai)

Makoto Shinkai’s emotional tour de force is the embodiment of the Japanese term “mono no aware,” which describes a wistful awareness of life’s transience. In the way its characters are haunted by bygone moments in the face of a vast and shapeless future, 5 Centimetres per Second could function as a spiritual companion to the oeuvre of Wong Kar-wai, but whereas Wong’s lovelorn protagonists are stuck in the past, Shinkai’s move forward, steadily, in a state of melancholic acceptance. Time is itself a character here, a fact brought to our attention by shots of clocks, the evolution of technology alongside the characters’ aging, and scenes where narrative stakes ensure that the passing of each second is palpably felt. And yet it is precisely the ephemerality of these seconds that lends them elevated significance —fittingly, the film’s animation is breathtakingly detailed and tactile, allowing us to identify with the characters by having us inhabit each, vivid moment before it vanishes. – Jonah Jeng

48. The Adventures of Tintin (Steven Spielberg)

Leave it to Steven Spielberg to eke more thrills out of an animated feature than most directors could with every live-action tool at their disposal. The Adventures of Tintin is colored and paced like a child’s fantastical imagining of how Hergé’s comics might play in motion, and the extent to which viewers buy it depends largely on their willingness to give themselves over to narrative and technical flights of fancy. Me? Four-and-a-half years later, I’m still waiting for a follow-up with bated breath. – Nick Newman

47. Titan A.E. (Don Bluth, Gary Goldman and Art Vitello)

It’s the movie that took down Don Bluth, netted Fox a $100 million loss, and starred the young voices of Matt Damon and Drew Barrymore. From a script by Joss Whedon, John August, and Ben Edlund, Titan A.E. is a swashbuckle-y tale with stirring visuals and moments of sheer originality that now feels like a more-accomplished precursor to something such as Guardians of the Galaxy. If you’re going to go down, this is an impressive picture to sink with. – Dan Mecca

46. Metropolis (Rintaro)

Metropolis has more than a little in common with the apocalyptic orgy of violence of 1988 anime touchstone Akira, as the story follows the tragic inevitability of mans’ relationship with overwhelming power. But Rintaro’s Metropolis — which is based on Osama Tezuka’s manga and Fritz Lang’s canonical film — is also a story of overwhelming kindness in its central relationship between Kenichi, a well-intentioned and naïve child, and Tima, a cyborg capable of immense destruction. Distinguished by its washed-out watercolor character designs and its inventive cast of characters, Metropolis is a distinctly lighter take on the characteristically dreary dystopia genre. – Michael Snydel

45. Song of the Sea (Tomm Moore)

Animation has never shied away from grief. It’s the bedrock of everything from Grave of the Fireflies to the majority of Pixar’s filmography, but it’s rarely been as unbearably beautiful as in 2014’s unfairly overlooked Song of the Sea. Animated with a mythic tableau style, steeped in Celtic folklore, and filled with a cast of characters worthy of Hayao Miyazaki, Tomm Moore’s work is the rare heartwarming family film that knows it doesn’t need to compromise genuine emotion with fake-outs or Hollywood endings. – Michael Snydel

44. The Secret World of Arrietty (Hiromasa Yonebayashi)

While much of Studio Ghibli’s popularity focuses on the adored writer-director Hayao Miyazaki, some works from other directors deserve equal praise. One of them — which, yes, cheats a bit because Miyazaki scripted it — is The Secret World of Arrietty by first-time helmer Hiromasa Yonebayashi. The film follows a little boy’s fascination with the Borrowers — small humans that live in our world — and weaves the story of him and his family with Arrietty, one of the Borrowers. There are intensely dramatic moments as the Borrowers are constantly striving to survive amidst this world of luxury and easy life that the larger humans enjoy. Much like some of the best of Ghibli’s work, the film works on multiple levels and layers and thus becomes one of the studio’s most beautiful, enjoyable, and enduring works. – Bill Graham

43. ParaNorman (Chris Butler and Sam Fell)

A story of bullies and the bullied, Laika Studios’ second stop-motion film, ParaNorman, was unfortunately overshadowed by their astounding previous effort, Coraline. But time has been kind, and ParaNorman feels ahead of its time in both the exploration of darker themes (witch hunts, child murder, bigotry) and its juxtaposition of a Puritan New England ghost story and a vividly supernatural present. Buoyed by Jon Brion’s characteristically thoughtful score and an inventive reconfiguration of horror movie iconography, ParaNorman is a coming-of-age story that recognizes that even the “bad guys” have their reasons. – Michael Snydel

42. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit (Nick Park and Steve Box)

Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit, Aardman Animation’s second feature collaboration with DreamWorks, brings Nick Park‘s brilliant claymation series about an absentminded inventor and his mute canine companion to the big screen. Working as humane pest removal specialists, Wallace and Gromit have hatched a plan to brainwash every hungry rabbit in town to dislike vegetables, preventing Gromit’s prized melon from being ruthlessly devoured. But the experiment backfires and the Were-Rabbit, a monstrous beast with an unquenchable appetite for veggies, is unleashed on the lush gardens of Tottington Holl. On par with the most uproarious shorts of Park’s career (working this time out with co-director Steve Box), the film slyly evokes fond memories of Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein in never treating its goofy leads as seriously as its surprisingly effective scares. It’s a shame that Park has announced the titular duo are likely retired, due to the failing health of voice actor Peter Sallis. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were Rabbit is a light-hearted and whimsically clever gem that also works as a charming introduction to the horror genre for young cinema-lovers. – Tony Hinds

41. Lilo & Stitch (Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois)

What other film can pull off starting with an all-out sci-fi adventure and transition into a heartful ode to culture and family? Before they delivered an even more impactful variation on a similar sort of creature-human bond with How to Train Your DragonChris Sanders and Dean DeBlois created this touching tale. Featuring a return to watercolor-painted backgrounds for Disney, as well as a reliance on 2D animation, it’s one of the company’s last in this era to have that long-missed tangibility. As often repeated in the film, “Family means nobody gets left behind,” and, by the end credits, you’ll feel like you’ve added a few new members to your own. – Jordan Raup

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- The Film Stage

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At 40, Aardman Animations Stays Stubbornly Eccentric

10 June 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In 1995, at pretty much the midpoint of Aardman Animations’ 40-year history, the Bristol-based cartoon studio’s co-founders, Peter Lord and David Sproxton, hatched the crazy idea of making a feature-length stop-motion film. It would be a send-up of the classic prison-break movie “The Great Escape.”

But starring chickens.

“It was really kind of a freak idea,” recalls Lord, who directed what became “Chicken Run,” the first of Aardman’s six features.

This was shortly before Pixar launched the CG revolution with “Toy Story,” and though Aardman was about to win its third Oscar for the Wallace and Gromit short “A Close Shave” [incidentally, the project in which it introduced hit character Shaun the Sheep], hardly anyone was making big-screen cartoon. In fact, apart from the work Henry Selick was doing for producer Tim Burton in the United States [most notably “A Nightmare Before Christmas”], the idea of an entire movie in stop-motion seemed outlandish.

“Audiences love that sense of tangibility, the sense that it isn’t perfect.” David Sproxton

But then, »

- Peter Debruge

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At 40, Aardman Animations Stays Stubbornly Eccentric

10 June 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In 1995, at pretty much the midpoint of Aardman Animations’ 40-year history, the Bristol-based cartoon studio’s co-founders, Peter Lord and David Sproxton, hatched the crazy idea of making a feature-length stop-motion film. It would be a send-up of the classic prison-break movie “The Great Escape.”

But starring chickens.

“It was really kind of a freak idea,” recalls Lord, who directed what became “Chicken Run,” the first of Aardman’s six features.

This was shortly before Pixar launched the CG revolution with “Toy Story,” and though Aardman was about to win its third Oscar for the Wallace and Gromit short “A Close Shave” [incidentally, the project in which it introduced hit character Shaun the Sheep], hardly anyone was making big-screen cartoon. In fact, apart from the work Henry Selick was doing for producer Tim Burton in the United States [most notably “A Nightmare Before Christmas”], the idea of an entire movie in stop-motion seemed outlandish.

“Audiences love that sense of tangibility, the sense that it isn’t perfect.” David Sproxton

But then, »

- Peter Debruge

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Aardman confirms new project, Eddie Redmayne lending voice

9 May 2016 10:27 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Eddie Redmayne is to provide the lead voice in Nick Park and Aardman's next movie, Early Man...

Whenever we have a rare moment where we despair of things, we like to remind ourselves that the wonderful Aardman exists. A company that time and time again has shown the value of storytelling, character and exemplary animation, the announcement of a new Aardman movie is surely cause for a national holiday.

Which is clearly our attempt to get the day off.

That notwithstanding, Aardman has revealed its new film, and it's called Early Man. What's more, for the first time since Wallace & Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit, Nick Park is directing. Mark Burton, co-director of the excellent Shaun The Sheep: The Movie, is working on the script.

Early Man is a movie set at the dawn of time, when woolly mammoths and prehistoric creatures were still around. »

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Eddie Redmayne Joins Aardman's "Early Man"

9 May 2016 6:46 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Eddie Redmayne has joined the cast of the Nick Park-directed, prehistoric-set Aardman Animation feature "Early Man" at StudioCanal.

The story is set at the dawn of time, when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the Earth. Redmayne will voice the central caveman character called Dug who, along with sidekick Hognob, unites his tribe against the mighty Bronze Age in a battle to beat them at their own game.

Redmayne, soon to be seen in the "Harry Potter" spin-off "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," is the first voice cast member to be be revealed.

Source: THR »

- Garth Franklin

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Eddie to be Heard, Not Seen

9 May 2016 5:38 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Perhaps sensing that everyone will be sick of looking at him by the tail end of 2017 (what with the multiple Oscar nominated transformations, the actual Oscar, and that new Fantastic Beasts franchise), Eddie Redmayne will give his ginger mug a wee break from gigantification on the big screen. Instead he'll be leading the voice cast of Aardman's Early Man which just went into production for release in 2018. The best part of the news is that Nick Park will be directing and he's been absent from that particular chair for too long. (His last feature was 11 long years ago, the Oscar winning Curse of the Were Rabbit.)

You can pencil it in for a Best Animated Feature nomination right now (albeit two years from now) because Aardman has quite a track record of delights (sorry Flushed Away!). They've got a heavy shelf of awards to prove it including Oscar nominations for »

- NATHANIEL R

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Eddie Redmayne will lend his voice to Aardman’s ‘Early Man’

9 May 2016 5:29 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

It has been confirmed that Oscar-winning actor Eddie Redmayne is to lend his voice to the next big Aardoman movie, Early Man.

We received the news of Redmayne’s casting via a press release from StudioCanal, who will distribute the film in the UK, earlier today.

Set at the dawn of time, when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the earth, Early Man tells the story of how plucky caveman Dug, along with sidekick Hognob (also pictured above) unites his tribe against the mighty Bronze Age in a battle to beat them at their own game. It also marks Nick Park’s first feature film since Academy Award winning Wallace and Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit. Supported by accomplished screenwriter Mark Burton this new film unleashes an unforgettable cast of hilarious new characters.

The new prehistoric comedy adventure will arrive in UK cinemas from January 26th, 2018.

The post Eddie Redmayne »

- Paul Heath

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Eddie Redmayne joins Aardman’s Early Man

9 May 2016 4:57 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Aardman and Studio Canal have announced that Eddie Redmayne is set to lend his voice talents to Nick Park’s new prehistoric comedy adventure Early Man as the voice of Dug.

“Not only is Eddie a joy to work with, his versatility and boundless energy have really helped to bring my new character to life,” states Nick Park. ” He embodies the cheeky charm, fun and plucky wit of Dug and I’m sure he’ll get along brilliantly with Dug’s sidekick Hognob.”

Set at the dawn of time, when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the earth, Early Man tells the story of how plucky caveman Dug, along with sidekick Hognob (also pictured) unites his tribe against the mighty Bronze Age in a battle to beat them at their own game.

Early Man is Nick Park’s first feature film since Wallace and Gromit: The curse of the Were-Rabbit, »

- Gary Collinson

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Eddie Redmayne to voice Aardman's 'Early Man'

9 May 2016 2:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Theory of Everything star to voice animated prehistoric adventure.

Oscar-winning animation outfit Aardman and Studiocanal have announced that Eddie Redmayne has joined prehistoric comedy adventure Early Man as the voice of lead character Dug.

Redmayne, who won the Oscar for playing Stephen Hawking in The Theory Of Everything and will next be seen in Harry Potter spin-off Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them, is the first cast member to be revealed as production begins.

The film is directed by Nick Park, whose stop-motion animated characters Wallace and Gromit have won several Oscars. Early Man marks Park’s first feature since Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit, which won the Oscar for best animated feature.

Park said: “Not only is Eddie a joy to work with, his versatility and boundless energy have really helped to bring my new character to life.  He embodies the cheeky charm, fun and plucky wit of Dug and I’m »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Eddie Redmayne Cast in Aardman Studios’ ‘Early Man’

9 May 2016 1:42 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Eddie Redmayne has been cast in Aardman Studios’ upcoming prehistoric comedy adventure “Early Man.”

Directed by Nick Park, the stop-frame pic is co-financed by Studiocanal, representing the second union between Europe’s two premier animation forces: the duo last teamed on 2015’s “Shaun the Sheep.”

Redmayne is the first cast member announced in the toon, which is set at the dawn of time when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the earth. The Brit thesp will voice the role of plucky caveman Dug who, along with his sidekick Hognob, unites his tribe against the mighty Bronze Age in a battle to beat them at their own game.

It marks Park’s first feature film since Oscar-winning “Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit.”

Pic is skidded for an early 2018 release. Studiocanal will distribute the title in the U.K., France, Germany, Australia and New Zealand and is selling worldwide rights for the pic. »

- Diana Lodderhose

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Eddie Redmayne Joins Aardman’s ‘Early Man’ – Cannes

9 May 2016 12:55 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Eddie Redmayne has joined Nick Park’s eagerly anticipated Early Man, which Studio Canal is financing, selling and distributing in its core markets. Early Man is a stop-frame feature film that sees Park going behind the camera for the first time since Wallace & Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit. Park also co-directed Chicken RunMark Burton and John O'Farrell have written the script. The BFI is also a partner on the film.  Set at the dawn of time, when dinosaurs and… »

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Cannes: Eddie Redmayne Joins Aardman's 'Early Man' Team

9 May 2016 12:46 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Aardman's upcoming prehistoric soccer animation film Early Man has landed one of the U.K.'s most famous voices. Eddie Redmayne has joined the Nick Park-directed adventure, voicing a central caveman character called Dug, Aardman and StudioCanal announced Monday. Redmayne, soon to be seen in Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, is the first voice to be be revealed for the animated project. "Not only is Eddie a joy to work with, his versatility and boundless energy have really helped to bring my new character to life," said Parks. "He embodies the cheeky charm,

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- Alex Ritman, Georg Szalai

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Ray Harryhausen Documentary Hits Blu-ray in June [Trailer]

28 April 2016 9:29 AM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

The remarkable career of the movie industry's most admired and influential special-effects auteur, the legendary Ray Harryhausen, is the subject of Gilles Penso's definitive documentary Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan.

The documentary features interviews with the man himself, Ray Harryhausen, as well as Randy Cook, Peter Jackson, Nick Park, Phil Tippet, Terry Gilliam, Dennis Muren, John Landis, Guillermo del Toro, James Cameron, Steven Spielberg and many more.

These filmmakers, who today push the boundaries of special effects movie-making, pay tribute to the father of Stop Motion animation [Continued ...] »

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Horror Highlights: Exclusive Short Film For My Facebook, Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Restoration

28 April 2016 8:02 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

As a special exclusive for Daily Dead readers, we have Carl Kelsch’s new short film, For My Facebook, available to watch now. Also in today’s Horror Highlights: Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Blu-ray / DVD release details, info on Europe’s 4K Uhd Blu-ray release of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, and a Q&A with Restoration director/co-writer/co-star Zack Ward.

Exclusive: Watch the Short Film For My Facebook: Press Release: “It all started with a funny image that popped in writer/director Carl Kelsch’s head: a play on words that yielded the final shots of ‘For My Facebook’ (To say more would spoil the ending). With only a few directing credits under his belt, he recruited jack-of-all-horror-trades Louie Cortes (Dir. of Attack of the Brain People, writer of Blood Slaughter Massacre) to do Sound. Kelsch, who also operated the camera, got input from Cortes on blocking and framing. »

- Tamika Jones

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