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Emmy Awards: ‘Feud’ Star Jackie Hoffman Offers to Accept Winner’s Trophy (Watch)

Emmy Awards: ‘Feud’ Star Jackie Hoffman Offers to Accept Winner’s Trophy (Watch)
The Oscars episode of FX’s “Feud” may well be one of its best — depicting the behind-the-scenes shenanigans at the 1963 Academy Awards. Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon) was nominated for best actress for her work in “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?” — but her co-star Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange) was famously snubbed. Crawford schemed to steal the spotlight from her longtime rival by offering to accept the award on the other nominees’ behalf, including Geraldine Page and Anne Bancroft, who ultimately won.

Feud’s” Emmy haul of 18 nominations includes one for Jackie Hoffman, who is up for an award for best supporting actress in a limited series for her work as the unforgettable Mamacita, Joan Crawford’s long-suffering, infinitely patient maid/sidekick — opposite castmate Judy Davis (who embodied Hedda Hopper), “Big Little Lies'” Laura Dern and Shailene Woodley, Regina King (“American Crime”), and Michelle Pfeiffer (“The Wizard of Lies”).

So when it comes to campaigning for the trophy
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'The Beguiled': How Sofia Coppola Reimagined a Macho Seventies War Film

'The Beguiled': How Sofia Coppola Reimagined a Macho Seventies War Film
Up until a few years ago, Sofia Coppola swore she would never do a remake. Then her production designer, Anne Ross, brought Don Siegel's 1971 pulp classic The Beguiled to her attention – and the director saw a film ripe for retelling. A group of Southern belles are holed up at an all-girls school during the Civil War; suddenly, the young women and their headmistress have their isolated existence disrupted by a wounded Union soldier. Nearly half a century ago, Clint Eastwood's Corporal John McBurney behaved as if he had arrived at a brothel,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning Praise Sofia Coppola at ‘The Beguiled’s’ L.A. Premiere

Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning Praise Sofia Coppola at ‘The Beguiled’s’ L.A. Premiere
Fresh off her landmark best director win at this year’s Cannes Film Festival — only the second woman in the fest’s history to have snagged the esteemed honor — Sofia Coppola was on hand Monday night at the festive premiere of Focus Features’ “The Beguiled,” held at the Directors Guild of America in Hollywood.

“Beguiled” stars Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning, Addison Riecke, and Emma Howard were all on hand for the screening and celebration, along with producer Youree Henley and executive producer Fred Roos.

For Fanning, shooting the Civil War period drama on location in Louisiana was a “fun” experience — except, perhaps, for the constricting costumes.

“The costumes were just amazing — except for the corsets,” she joked. “Those were no fun.”

Related

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Beguiled

But Coppola was precise and daring in her vision, and the cast and crew raved about her directorial prowess.

“When you’re producing,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Nicole Kidman, Elle Fanning & Kirsten Dunst Stun on 'The Beguiled' Cannes Red Carpet – See Their Amazing Looks!

The Beguiled ladies (and gentleman) dressed to impress at the film's premiere at the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival on Wednesday.

Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning, Colin Farrell, director Sofia Coppola, Addison Riecke and Angourie Rice were all smiles as they posed for the cameras on the iconic red steps at the Palais des Festivals before entering the screening.

Getty Images

Kidman, who has been dominating the fashion game at the Croisette, was stunning in a metallic, flapper-inspired Michael Kors Collection gown. The 49-year-old actress completed her look with chandelier earrings, silver heels, a low ponytail and burgundy lips.

Getty Images

Related: 5 Frocks and Counting! Nicole Kidman Stuns in a Series of Gorgeous Gowns at Cannes Film Festival

Fanning, 19, looked ethereal in a custom-made, strapless, lilac Rodarte dress. The Neon Demon actress opted for a neutral look and accessorized her evening wear with diamond earrings and a pearl-and-diamond necklace.

Getty Images

Watch:
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Sofia Coppola’s ‘The Beguiled’ Wows Cannes While Nicole Kidman Calls Out Lack of Female Directors

Sofia Coppola’s ‘The Beguiled’ Wows Cannes While Nicole Kidman Calls Out Lack of Female Directors
It’s so far so good for Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled” at Cannes, which played well for the press on Wednesday morning. The movie is a gorgeously shot battle of the sexes led by the formidable duo of Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell (who both star in another competition entry, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”) along with Coppola’s “Virgin Suicides” star Kirsten Dunst and “Somewhere” star Elle Fanning.

Read More: With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake

Writer-director Coppola reenters the Cannes spotlight with her high-profile adaptation of Don Siegel’s 1971 Clint Eastwood Civil War drama, based on the 1966 Thomas Cullinan novel. About two years ago, Coppola’s production designer Anne Ross urged her to remake the movie, a well-reviewed flop when released. Audiences weren’t ready for Eastwood’s tall, dark, and handsome soldier to be manhandled by a school full of vengeful women.

Judging from the enthusiastic press reaction here, they’re more accepting now.

Here’s what we learned at the press conference (check out my interview with Coppola).

It’s about the women

“This story had to be directed by a woman,” Nicole Kidman told Canal Plus before the press conference. “The essence of it is feminine, it’s seen from a female point of view.”

At the press conference, she said that her schoolmistress is “is protecting these girls in a treacherous, difficult time, and they’re surviving. Her motivation is to guide them and protect them.”

“Any time a group of women is cut off from the world,” said Coppola, “different dynamics come out…I tried to put [the movie] out of my mind and imagine how I would tell this story and start again.”

Farrell added, “With repression, if there’s a blanket people find themselves beneath, there will be a heavy price to pay no matter the gender.”

“When you are dealing with people who are pent up together,” said Dunst, “no matter if male, female or mixture, something will come out. Aggressions and feelings are corseted up and get unleashed because this new dynamic comes in.”

“He comes in and ruins everything!” said Kidman, channeling the school marm originally played by Geraldine Page. “We were fine. All we couldn’t do was procreate. Good riddance to him!”

Coppola was also enthused to be reunited with her former stars, including Dunst and Fanning.

“I loved working with Kirsten and could see her as the teacher,” said Coppola of her casting process. “I always admired Nicole and imagined her as the headmistress as I was writing. I knew she would bring her twisted humor to the role.”

Fanning, now at 18, was old enough to play a young student. Coppola discovered her at age 11 with “Somewhere.”

“We were making the movie from a female point-of-view,” said Coppola, “that was part of the fun of it. The core of it is the power struggles between the male and female, which are relevant in a hopefully entertaining juicy story.”

Colin Farrell in “The Beguiled

And one man

“I have a penis,” Farrell told Canal Plus of his role in “The Beguiled” as a wounded union soldier who a young student drags into a Virginia ladies school. “Treachery and hilarity ensues.”

“He was a good sport about being our object,” said Coppola.

“I didn’t have to worry about being the token male,” he added at the press conference. “I grew up with three very strong and brilliant and kind and smart women in my life, my mother and two sisters. To be surrounded by talented, decent, smart, insightful creative and serious women — I was spoiled by Sofia Coppola who set a particular mood of comfort, ease and trust. It allows you as an actor to play and explore.”

He added, “I have been doing this for 20 years, and it’s my favorite experience, my favorite shoot. She’s elegant and smart and has a gentility to her, which is not to say she doesn’t have an incredible creative edge inside. It’s nice to have that elegance and tenderness pervade the whole experience.”

Farrell never met with Clint Eastwood, who originated his role. “I had seen the film some years ago; I was deeply disturbed by the original film, it stayed with me. I said I was never doing a remake again, but when this came around it was an easy ‘yes.’ It’s a retelling or reinterpretation, which doesn’t mean it lacks originality. Sofia did something very original with it. Clint was extraordinary in the Siegel film. But I was able to retain my Irish accent, the character was an Irish soldier fighting from a mercenary perspective. It’s a bit of an immigrant story, he’s fresh off the boat, like so many of my countrymen who sailed to America to survive. That was unique to our experience of telling the film.”

“I wanted to contrast the very masculine exotic enemy soldier [who] comes onto this delicate feminine world,” said Coppola. “Colin is charming and charismatic, and I knew he would find a way to connect with each character differently. He’s connected to his dark side.”

Kidman rules Cannes

Coppola went to see Kidman in a play in London and had dinner with her afterwards. “She had this script,” said the actress. “You could give me the phone book and I’ll do it.”

Kidman wants to work with more women directors, she said, citing the grim Women in Film statistics for film and television (roughly 4 percent of major motion pictures were directed by women last year). “The important thing to say and keep saying is luckily we had Jane Campion here,” Kidman said. “We women have to support female directors, that’s a given. Now hopefully that will change over time. People keep saying it’s so different. It isn’t.”

Coppola made the film for the big screen

Coppola collaborated for the first time with Wong Kar Wai cinematographer Philippe Le Sourd with gorgeous results on “The Beguiled,” shooting in 35 mm. “He helped me to create the atmosphere and the world of the film,” she said. “With Le Sourd’s beautiful work, all of the work [in the film], I hope people will see the photography on the big screen.”

Sofia Coppola was making this film for the big screen, in the way of framing, and all the things we do,” said Kidman. “At the same time, we need stories, opportunities and need things to be seen, the world is changing and we have to change with it. As an actor I get to work in all of the mediums. Jean-Marc Vallee directed ‘Big Little Lies’ for for the small screen. I have a foot in every area.”

She added, “I’m turning 50 this year. I’ve never had more work than right now, partly because I work in TV, and I work in films made for the small and the big screen.”

Read More: Before ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola’s ‘Marie Antoinette’ Showed Her Genius for Crafting Characters Through Environments

You can see both versions of “The Beguiled

A double feature of the two films will play Quentin Tarantino’s New Beverly theater in Los Angeles. “I’m excited to watch both of them,” Coppola said. “They’re two sides of the same story, flipping it on its head, I hope.”

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Related stories'The Beguiled' Exclusive: Here's What It's Like to Work On A Sofia Coppola Set -- WatchSofia Coppola Movies Ranked Worst to BestSofia Coppola On Female Sexuality In 'The Beguiled' And Why She Hopes Gay Men Find Colin Farrell Sexy
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Sofia Coppola’s ‘The Beguiled’ Wows Cannes While Nicole Kidman Calls Out Lack of Female Directors

  • Indiewire
Sofia Coppola’s ‘The Beguiled’ Wows Cannes While Nicole Kidman Calls Out Lack of Female Directors
It’s so far so good for Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled” at Cannes, which played well for the press on Wednesday morning. The movie is a gorgeously shot battle of the sexes led by the formidable duo of Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell (who both star in another competition entry, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”) along with Coppola’s “Virgin Suicides” star Kirsten Dunst and “Somewhere” star Elle Fanning.

Read More: With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake

Writer-director Coppola reenters the Cannes spotlight with her high-profile adaptation of Don Siegel’s 1971 Clint Eastwood Civil War drama, based on the 1966 Thomas Cullinan novel. About two years ago, Coppola’s production designer Anne Ross urged her to remake the movie, a well-reviewed flop when released. Audiences weren’t ready for Eastwood’s tall, dark, and handsome soldier to be manhandled by a school full of vengeful women.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Beguiled’

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Beguiled’
Don Siegel’s 1971 Civil War drama “The Beguiled,” starring Clint Eastwood as a wounded Union soldier hiding out at a girls’ boarding school in rural Mississippi, is a quintessential film of the early ’70s — and by that, I don’t mean it’s any sort of masterpiece. Far from it. It’s a crudely lit piece of baroque Gothic exploitation, “gripping” yet overwrought, and it basically has the plot of a porn film. Eastwood’s character falls into one bed after another, and he receives a shockingly cruel punishment when Geraldine Page, as the turned-on but repressed headmistress, makes the vengeful decision to amputate his injured leg for dubious medical reasons. “The Beguiled” is like a mediocre Tennessee Williams play staged by Sam Peckinpah as a third-wave-feminist horror film. Yet there’s no denying it’s a picture of its time.

So why would Sofia Coppola want to remake it?
See full article at Variety - Film News »

With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake

With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake
With her sixth feature, “The Beguiled,” Sofia Coppola returns to Cannes in the main Competition. It’s her first time since 2006, when the reception for royal costume drama “Marie Antoinette” evolved from a scattering of boos to become a reported misfire. That’s the power of the Cannes echo chamber. Her visually sumptuous and witty $40 million studio movie earned a standing ovation at the public screening and a range of reviews, but only made $60.8 million worldwide — not nearly enough to make it profitable.

Coppola had better Cannes luck with her smaller-scaled first feature, the dreamy literary adaptation “The Virgin Suicides” ($10.6 million worldwide). It starred Kirsten Dunst and broke out of Director’s Fortnight with critics’ raves. Her Tokyo-set Bill Murray-Scarlett Johansson two-hander “Lost in Translation” ($117 million worldwide) debuted in Venice on its way to Coppola’s Original Screenplay Oscar.

Back on the indie side were Chateau Marmont Hollywood-slice
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake

  • Indiewire
With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake
With her sixth feature, “The Beguiled,” Sofia Coppola returns to Cannes in the main Competition. It’s her first time since 2006, when the reception for royal costume drama “Marie Antoinette” evolved from a scattering of boos to became a reported misfire. That’s the power of the Cannes echo chamber. Her visually sumptuous and witty $40 million studio movie earned a standing ovation at the public screening and a range of reviews, but only made $60.8 million worldwide — not nearly enough to make it profitable.

Coppola had better Cannes luck with her smaller-scaled first feature, the dreamy literary adaptation “The Virgin Suicides” ($10.6 million worldwide). It starred Kirsten Dunst and broke out of Director’s Fortnight with critics’ raves. Her Tokyo-set Bill Murray-Scarlett Johansson two-hander “Lost in Translation” ($117 million worldwide) debuted in Venice on its way to Coppola’s Original Screenplay Oscar.

Back on the indie side were Chateau Marmont Hollywood-slice
See full article at Indiewire »

Kirsten Dunst and Sofia Coppola on Hollywood Sexism, Their Feminist ‘Beguiled’ Remake

Kirsten Dunst and Sofia Coppola on Hollywood Sexism, Their Feminist ‘Beguiled’ Remake
Sofia Coppola met her muse Kirsten Dunst in 1998. The actress was just 16 at the time, and the 27-year-old daughter of Francis Ford Coppola was about to make her directorial debut with “The Virgin Suicides,” based on a novel that she loved. Dunst was so innocent, she brought her mom along to chaperone their initial conversation. “I was a little nervous,” she says. “It was my first adult role!”

So much of Hollywood is filtered through the male gaze. But Coppola, who tells stories from the perspectives of her heroines, immediately put Dunst at ease. “She was always a good influence on me as a young woman,” Dunst says, recalling a compliment that Coppola once paid her that she never forgot. “She said to me, ‘I love your teeth; don’t ever fix your teeth.’ I remember doing a ‘Spider-Man’ movie later, and one of the producers was like, ‘I need
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Summer And Smoke (1961) Screening May 5th as Part of ‘Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis’

“The tables have turned, yes, the tables have turned with a vengeance! You’ve come around to my old way of thinking and I to yours like two people exchanging a call on each other at the same time, and each one finding the other one gone out, the door locked against him and no one to answer the bell!”

The 1961 classic Summer And Smoke, based on the Tennessee Williams play and starring Geraldine Page and Lawrence Harvey screens in a continuous loop Friday, May 5 in the Public Media Commons in Grand Center in St. Louis as part of this year’s Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. This is a free screening (actually, continuous loop of screenings). Geraldine Page’s daughter and actress, Angelica Page, will be in town for the festival and part of a dramatic reading of ‘ensemble 2.0’ , a play based on Francesca Williams’s collection of family letters.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘The Beguiled’ Trailer: Nicole Kidman Takes Revenge On Colin Farrell In Sofia Coppola’s Remake

  • Deadline
‘The Beguiled’ Trailer: Nicole Kidman Takes Revenge On Colin Farrell In Sofia Coppola’s Remake
Sofia Coppola returns behind the camera in The Beguiled, a remake of Don Siegel's 1971 movie starring Clint Eastwood and Geraldine Page. The drama was recently selected to compete for the Palme d’Or in the main competition section at this year's Cannes Film Festival. Ahead of its world premiere at the Croisette, Focus Features has released the official trailer. Based on the 1966 novel by Thomas Cullinan A Painted Devil, The Beguiled is set during the Civil War at a…
See full article at Deadline »

Feud Recap: Tarnished Gold

Sunday’s Feud: Bette and Joan took us to the 1963 Oscars, where there was, remarkably, only a single contender in the category of Least Gracious Non-Nominee: a certain Miss Crawford. How ugly did it get? Pour yourself a stiff one — you’re going to need it if you plan to read on.

RelatedFeud Season 2 to Focus on Charles and Diana’s Royal Estrangement

‘All They Want Is A Catfight’ | As we began “And the Winner Is… ,” Olivia — still shooting that 1970s documentary — warned us that Oscar night was really the point of no return for Joan and Bette. If,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Latanya Richardson Jackson Looks Back on Her Long Career

Latanya Richardson Jackson’s career is about hard work and continuity. Last year, she appeared in “The Taming of the Shrew” at the Public Theatre, a relationship that began in the 1970s. And this month marks the 40th anniversary of her first mention in Variety, when she was cast in “Perdido (Lost),” a play by Soledad at the Henry Street Settlement. She has directed and acted in numerous productions at the Lower East Side site for social services and arts.

Richardson started acting as a teen in Atlanta, where she also met her future husband, Samuel L. Jackson. They’ve been together 47 years. Richardson was Tony-nominated for the 2014 revival of “A Raisin in the Sun” with Denzel Washington. This month, she concludes her guest arc on “Grey’s Anatomy,” as the mother of Maggie (Kelly McCreary).

Next up for Richardson Jackson: More work with the philanthropic Samuel L. & Latanya R. Jackson Foundation, more
See full article at Variety - TV News »

How Sarah Paulson and Jessica Lange Became Ryan Murphy's Treasured Muses

How Sarah Paulson and Jessica Lange Became Ryan Murphy's Treasured Muses
The next episode of FX's Feud: Bette and Joan isn't just the series' best episode yet—it centers on the 35th Oscars in which the truly unimaginable happened—but also marks the long-awaited reunion of Ryan Murphy's two greatest muses (and former co-stars on American Horror Story), Sarah Paulson and Jessica Lange. Lange, who's already been killing it for four episodes as Joan Crawford (just give her the Emmy already), is joined by Paulson playing Oscar nominee Geraldine Page and as expected, their scene is glorious. It's one scene. On the phone. But every second of it is decadent. As is the entire episode—directed by Murphy. You know how everyone watching The People vs. O.J. Simpson...
See full article at E! Online »

Kathy Bates Hints That Sarah Paulson Might Be Playing Princess Diana in 'Feud' Season 2

Kathy Bates Hints That Sarah Paulson Might Be Playing Princess Diana in 'Feud' Season 2
Sarah Paulson is joining the second season of Ryan Murphy's Feud -- which will follow the tumultuous relationship between Prince Charles and Princess Diana -- and we might now have a better idea at which historical figure the Golden Globe winner is going to play.

Paulson and actress Kathy Bates sat down alongside their fellow American Horror Story: Roanoke stars at a PaleyFest panel on Sunday, and Bates added fuel to the fire of speculation that Paulson will be starring as the late princess herself.

Watch: Sarah Paulson Reveals Dream ‘Feud: Charles and Diana’ Role -- and It’s Totally Unexpected!

During the panel discussion, Bates referred to Paulson several times as "the people's princess," which is, of course, the nickname given to the beloved Princess Diana long before her untimely death in August 1997, in a fatal car accident in Paris.

It's unclear if Bates was simply joking, intentionally teasing fans, or if she
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Inside Line: Scoop on The Flash, Once, Supergirl, Five-0, Blindspot, Grimm, Chicago Fire, The Originals and More

Inside Line: Scoop on The Flash, Once, Supergirl, Five-0, Blindspot, Grimm, Chicago Fire, The Originals and More
When will The Flash unmask Savitar? Does Once Upon a Time have another Oz-some episode planned? Is three a crowd for Supergirl sweethearts? Read on for answers to those questions plus teases from other shows.

RelatedThe Flash‘s Grant Gustin Previews Tough Talk From Fallen Foes and Friends, Holds Out Hope for ‘WestAllen’ Future

When will we find out who Savitar is on The Flash? —Arlena

“Slowly, different characters are going to learn who Savitar is,” Danielle Panabaker shared during my visit to the set last week. “But I don’t know if the audience is going to be told anytime soon.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Review: Woody Allen's "Interiors" (1978); Blu-ray Release From Twilight Time

  • CinemaRetro
“A Long Day’S Journey Into A Little Night Silence”

By Raymond Benson

Woody’s Allen’s first dramatic feature film, Interiors, released in 1978 on the heels of his hugely successful and Oscar-winning masterpiece, Annie Hall, was met with praise by some and head-scratching by others. Most critics, however, acknowledged that the picture was a step the artist needed to take in his evolution as a filmmaker.

Prior to Annie Hall, Allen’s films were zany comedies—the “early funny ones,” as facetiously described in a later work, Stardust Memories. Beginning with Annie, Allen made a quantum leap forward in originality, confidence, and stylistic maturity. He reinvented the romantic comedy. In many ways, Annie Hall is a movie with a European sensibility. It could be argued that Allen’s body of work post-Annie resembles the kind of material made by a director like, say, Francois Truffaut—small, well-written, intimate gems about people,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Exclusive: Sarah Paulson Reveals Dream ‘Feud: Charles and Diana’ Role -- and It’s Totally Unexpected!

Exclusive: Sarah Paulson Reveals Dream ‘Feud: Charles and Diana’ Role -- and It’s Totally Unexpected!
Sarah Paulson is ready for Feud, season two!

The actress pops up as Geraldine Page on the current season of Feud: Bette and Joan, and she might step into another real-life figure’s shoes next year for Feud: Charles and Diana. The second season of the Ryan Murphy anthology series will break down Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s tumultuous relationship. Now, one might expect Paulson would want to play Diana -- but that’s not the case.

Watch: Sarah Paulson Wins First Golden Globe

I wanna play the Queen Mother!” Paulson spills to Et. “I don't think he's gonna let me do that. That might be a bridge too far … he might also be like, 'Oh, lady... no!’ I could play one of the corgis.”

Et caught up with the actress at the Family Equality Council’s Impact Awards, which she co-chaired, at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel over the weekend. She says she
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »
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