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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

19 items from 2017


"Twin Peaks," Episode 12 Recap: Next Stop, Wendy's

1 August 2017 5:59 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.It's great to be in the know. To have a moment (hopefully more than one) when the veil drops and, per that old song, the mysteries of love (of life) come clear. Part 12 of Mark Frost and David Lynch's revived Twin Peaks opens with just such a scene, as FBI Agent Tammy Preston (Chrysta Bell) is initiated into the Blue Rose Task Force by her superiors Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer) and Gordon Cole (Lynch). The references Albert drops—to things like "Project Blue Book" and to people like "Chet Desmond"—will be familiar to any Peaks obsessive who has pored over the original series, the Fire Walk with Me movie, or Frost's 2016 tie-in novel The Secret History of Twin Peaks. But remember that »

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Twin Peaks Recap: Return of the Queen

31 July 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

It took 12 whole episodes, but Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn) has finally returned to our television screens.

The Twin Peaks chat rooms, message boards and Twitter feeds have been speculating for years on end about where we would find her and how (Is she in Hollywood? Is she the mysterious billionaire in New York? Is she still in a coma? Was she horribly disfigured in the bank explosion? Is she now running One Eyed Jacks?). But I am fairly certain that no one saw this outcome, this development, this new Audrey.

At first I found it confusing and jarring: that weird guy is Audrey’s husband? »

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Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

24 June 2017 1:03 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a »

- Andre Soares

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"Twin Peaks," Episode 7 Recap: …And That's Enough Said About That

20 June 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.So that's how David Lynch does an info dump. First, with a cheeky, knowing scene featuring the brothers Horne: "Jerry, what's going on?" asks Ben (Richard Beymer) after his cannabis-infused sibling (David Patrick Kelly) phones him from the woods. "I think I'm high!…I don't know where I am!" Jerry screams, perhaps speaking for a good subsection of the Twin Peaks revival audience, who have, over the six prior installments, been given only glimpses of a larger picture. Narrative momentum comes in asides; the more prevalent longueurs are reserved for atmosphere and mood, for full immersion in apparent stasis.Part 7 shakes things up, following the brotherly freak-out with several story reveals that come in quick succession. But there's a niggling sense throughout all the »

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Twin Peaks season 3 episode 7 review: There’s A Body All Right

19 June 2017 1:17 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Joe Matar Jun 19, 2017

The latest Twin Peaks episode takes some strides towards making sense of what we already know...

This review contains spoilers.

See related  James Cameron's Avatar: five years on Avatar review

3.7 There's A Body All Right

This episode was almost the opposite of the last one. Part 6 showed very little interest in illuminating existing plot threads, instead introducing all manner of new madness paired with a heavy dose of disturbing imagery. Part 7 kindly takes strides toward making some sense of what we already know and only a few minorly gross things happen!

Take my use of “strides” and “some sense” with a grain of salt, though. It’s just that, with the pace of this series, getting a few small steps forward in plot feels like a giant leap. Regardless, it was refreshing and appreciated that we got some new, mostly comprehensible developments and also that a lot of it went down, for a change, in the town of Twin Peaks itself.

It’s amazing just how much David Lynch and Mark Frost appear to be dedicated to making all of Twin Peaks a cohesive whole. It was an awesome surprise that Annie Blackburn’s message to Laura Palmer, delivered in a dream in Fire Walk With Me, found its way into the missing pages of Laura’s diary, which have now been dug up by Hawk. However, despite this feeling like a reward for fans who have stuck with Twin Peaks across years and media, the opening scenes in the police station were unfortunately some of the weakest of the episode.

After the diary revelation, the show indulges in going down memory lane by having Frank Truman awkwardly call up his brother Harry and then, even more awkwardly, call up Doc Hayward on Skype. It’s like the show feels it needs to do its duty by acknowledging Harry’s existence, but we all know Michael Ontkean isn’t reprising his role, so we get these forced scenes of Robert Forster having a one-sided conversation with a dormant cell phone. I’m sad Harry’s not in the show, but I don’t know that this way of dealing with it is adding much.

Doc Hayward, I can understand more. The actor, Warren Frost (Mark Frost’s father), died during production, so this Skype appearance is likely the creators’ desire to include him in the Twin Peaks universe one last time. Though I appreciate the sentiment, the scene is a clumsy one. First, we have a conversation between Frank and the doctor about whether he knows what Skype is. Then, once on Skype, Hayward’s only contribution to the mystery is to reaffirm that Coop was acting strangely when he came out of the Black Lodge. Other than that, the two men just make corny jokes about fishing. There’s never even a justification for why this had to be a Skype call when they were already on the phone together previously. And it’s also glaringly odd that Truman doesn’t ask how the rest of Hayward’s family is doing.

I don’t mean to be cold. As mentioned, I see why this is in the show, but, unlike the Log Lady’s scene in the first episode that was both moving and plot-integral, this feels ham-fisted and largely unnecessary (though I guess the information that Evil Coop was seen in the intensive care ward could come back later).

Speaking of reaffirmation, Diane seeing the evil Mr. C doesn’t do much except confirm for the millionth time that it’s not the Cooper we all know and love. But they get away with it because, after finally meeting Diane, we were waiting to see her do something. Plus, we learned that Mr. C did something horrible to Diane that apparently soured her relationship with the entire FBI. I think it’s cool that Diane has turned out to be a surly customer. I don’t know what I expected, but it somehow feels like a subversion of it. However, I found her saying “fuck you” to everyone a bit corny. Still, Laura Dern is a great actor and her scene with Gordon after meeting with Evil Dale is perhaps the best of the episode.

Moving more plots forward, it’s cool and terrifying that the core conflict has been reinvigorated as Mr. C is now out of prison. Horror looms! Further, it was exciting to see the dwarf assassin easily taken down by Dougie/Coop, indicating to us that Coop’s FBI training is still with him. I enjoyed the new stuff we were learning so much that my heart sank a little when the episode ended. I wanted more! (I less enjoyed watching that guy sweep the Roadhouse. I rarely feel like David Lynch is stretching scenes out purely to screw with us, but in this case… come on, David.)

A stray thought: it’s incredible how instantly transporting the old Twin Peaks score is. When Andy was standing on that road and the spooky part of Laura Palmer’s theme kicked in, it was, for that instant, like we were back in the old Twin Peaks. I know I shouldn’t expect too much of the old stuff to return, but I must admit that, going forward, I hope those music cues show up more regularly.

Read Joe's review of the previous episode, Don't Die, here.

// »

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‘Twin Peaks’ Mvp Wally Brando: 5 Reasons Michael Cera’s Brilliant Cameo Is Just What the Show Needed

30 May 2017 11:58 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first four episodes of “Twin Peaks.]

Of all the confusing, confounding things on the return of “Twin Peaks,” we have no mixed feelings about one thing: Wally Brando.

The ingeniously named character shows up in the fourth episode of the season as a cameo by Michael Cera. Wally Brando (Brennan?) is the adult son of Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department receptionist Lucy (Kimmy Robertson) and deputy Andy (Harry Goaz), and was born on Marlon Brando’s birthday, April 3. While we had known Lucy was pregnant in the original series, Wally wasn’t born until after Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) went missing.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ Guide to Returning Characters and What Clues They Offer — Parts 3 & 4 (An Ongoing List)

The 25 years that have passed have been kind to Wally Brando, who has taken to the open road on his motorcycle and stops by Twin Peaks to bring important messages to his folks and the town’s acting sheriff. »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Twin Peaks’ Mvp Wally Brando: 5 Reasons Michael Cera’s Brilliant Cameo Is Just What the Show Needed

30 May 2017 11:58 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first four episodes of “Twin Peaks.]

Of all the confusing, confounding things on the return of “Twin Peaks,” we have no mixed feelings about one thing: Wally Brando.

The ingeniously named character shows up in the fourth episode of the season as a cameo by Michael Cera. Wally Brando (Brennan?) is the adult son of Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department receptionist Lucy (Kimmy Robertson) and deputy Andy (Harry Goaz), and was born on Marlon Brando’s birthday, April 3. While we had known Lucy was pregnant in the original series, Wally wasn’t born until after Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) went missing.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ Guide to Returning Characters and What Clues They Offer — Parts 3 & 4 (An Ongoing List)

The 25 years that have passed have been kind to Wally Brando, who has taken to the open road on his motorcycle and stops by Twin Peaks to bring important messages to his folks and the town’s acting sheriff. »

- Hanh Nguyen

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"Twin Peaks," Episodes 3 & 4 Recap: Hell-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!

30 May 2017 8:44 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.What's an FBI Special Agent to do after being locked away for 25 years in unearthly purgatory? Episodes three and four of Mark Frost and David Lynch's revived Twin Peaks, which aired on Showtime this past Sunday in a two-hour block (aside from September's two-part finale, it's all single, hour-long episodes from hereon out), follow our besuited, Black Lodge-incarcerated hero Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) as he reintegrates into modern terrestrial society. So this is basically Peaks doing Rectify, just with a sterile death row replaced by an infernal hellscape out of Clive Barker. Or David Lynch, really. What's becoming more and more evident as the new Peaks progresses is that the series is, in large part, a repository for Lynch's subconscious, past and present. »

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'Twin Peaks' Revival Delves Deeper Into 'Fire Walk With Me' -- and It's Absolutely Insane (Hi Naomi Watts!)

28 May 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Woo boy, Twin Peaks fans.

If you thought the first two hours of the Twin Peaks revival were weird, you haven't really seen anything yet.

Let's start with what is easily the David Lynch-iest sequence of the show so far.

The Purple Spaceship

After being expelled from the Black Lodge and taking a quick pit stop in the glass box in New York City, real Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) finds himself in a weird purple spaceship thing with a woman who is listed in the credits as Naido (Nae Yuuki). Her eyes are melted shut, which lends some weight to the idea that eyes are important in Twin Peaks -- Ruth Davenport (Mary Stofle) was missing an eye and it also appeared that Evil Cooper (MacLachlan) shot Phyllis Hastings (Cornelia Guest) through the eye.

The woman eventually disappears and Cooper encounters the shadowy head of Major Garland Briggs (Don S. Davis), who utters the phrase "blue rose »

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‘Twin Peaks’: Former Series Star Joan Chen Pitches Her Character’s Wild Return to David Lynch

24 May 2017 8:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

David Lynch’s wildly anticipated “Twin Peaks” revival is kitted out with plenty of talented faces — over 200, both old and new — but there’s still a handful of original stars who were not tapped to return for the Showtime series. One of them is Joan Chen, who played Josie Packard during the show’s original run (and, incidentally, was the very first face to appear in the series’ very first episode, way back in 1990).

Chen, however, is eager to change that, and The Hollywood Reporter shares a compelling — and kind of wild — letter from the actress that she sent to Lynch, asking for her role to be reprised. Given that Chen’s character ended her “Twin Peaks” run as a drawer knob, it’s obviously written from a unique perspective.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Guide to Returning Characters and How They’re Helping – or Hurting – Cooper: Parts 1 & 2 (An Ongoing List)

“Dear David, »

- Kate Erbland

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‘Twin Peaks’: Former Series Star Joan Chen Pitches Her Character’s Wild Return to David Lynch

24 May 2017 8:54 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

David Lynch’s wildly anticipated “Twin Peaks” revival is kitted out with plenty of talented faces — over 200, both old and new — but there’s still a handful of original stars who were not tapped to return for the Showtime series. One of them is Joan Chen, who played Josie Packard during the show’s original run (and, incidentally, was the very first face to appear in the series’ very first episode, way back in 1990).

Chen, however, is eager to change that, and The Hollywood Reporter shares a compelling — and kind of wild — letter from the actress that she sent to Lynch, asking for her role to be reprised. Given that Chen’s character ended her “Twin Peaks” run as a drawer knob, it’s obviously written from a unique perspective.

“Dear David, »

- Kate Erbland

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The ‘Twin Peaks’ Log Lady Is the Series’ Wisest Character, and Could Save Them All

22 May 2017 10:17 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first two parts of the “Twin Peaks” revival series.]

On Sunday’s premiere of “Twin Peaks,” fans reunited with beloved character Margaret Lanterman, better known as the Log Lady. The reunion was bittersweet, though, since actress Catherine Coulson had died from cancer shortly after shooting her scenes for the revival series in September 2015.

In the two scenes in which the Log Lady appears, the evidence of Coulson’s battle with the disease is evident: She’s weaker, speaks haltingly and breathes with the aid of a nasal cannula. Despite this obvious infirmity, though, it was heartening to see that the Log Lady is still on her game and possibly sharper than ever. In these first two episodes in which the women are treated viciously on screen, it was inspiring to see that one woman isn’t beaten down or cowed, and in fact provides guidance and offers sustenance.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a »

- Hanh Nguyen

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The ‘Twin Peaks’ Log Lady Is the Series’ Wisest Character, and Could Save Them All

22 May 2017 10:17 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first two parts of the “Twin Peaks” revival series.]

On Sunday’s premiere of “Twin Peaks,” fans reunited with beloved character Margaret Lanterman, better known as the Log Lady. The reunion was bittersweet, though, since actress Catherine Coulson had died from cancer shortly after shooting her scenes for the revival series in September 2015.

In the two scenes in which the Log Lady appears, the evidence of Coulson’s battle with the disease is evident: She’s weaker, speaks haltingly and breathes with the aid of a nasal cannula. Despite this obvious infirmity, though, it was heartening to see that the Log Lady is still on her game and possibly sharper than ever. In these first two episodes in which the women are treated viciously on screen, it was inspiring to see that one woman isn’t beaten down or cowed, and in fact provides guidance and offers sustenance.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Twin Peaks’ Original Series in 1990: Oddball, but ‘Brilliant Television’

20 May 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

On Sunday, Showtime debuts “Twin Peaks,” a continuation of the 1990 series that is unique in TV history — the show has maintained a fan base after a quarter century, even though there were only 30 episodes, most of them low-rated.

Like the new incarnation, the original “Twin Peaks” was kept in secrecy, but media (and audience) anticipation was high. ABC premiered the two-hour pilot on April 8, 1990, and it was an immediate hit. However, the show quickly faded from view.

Even before it started, Variety predicted it would be a challenge. In a story on Feb. 28, 1990, a few weeks before the debut, Elizabeth Guider wrote that it was much hyped, but “the series represents a ratings risk: It has no big names, no car chases, no glitz, no overt sex or violence. What it does have is an offbeat intelligence at work on a very American kind of story — murder in a small town.”

Twin Peaks »

- Tim Gray

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Inside the Roller-Coaster Journey to Get David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Back on TV

9 May 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

It came to David Lynch in a flash:

A red room. A dream version of Laura Palmer. An older Special Agent Dale Cooper, silent and pensive. The Man From Another Place, speaking cryptically: “That gum you like is going to come back in style.”

It was early 1989, and Lynch was hard at work on “Twin Peaks.” He and co-creator Mark Frost were trying to meet the deadlines of ABC, the network that had commissioned a drama about love, pie and murder in a Pacific Northwest town. Lynch was under pressure to create scenes that would allow the pilot to be released as a TV movie in case it didn’t get picked up to series. But the filmmaker didn’t have any ideas for footage that could wrap up the story neatly enough to please a movie audience.

Then he walked outside during an early-evening break from editing and folded his arms on the roof of a »

- Maureen Ryan

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Why 'Slap Shot' Captures the 1970s Better Than Any Other Sports Movie

24 February 2017 6:37 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Over the last few decades – thanks in part to movies and TV shows like Dazed and Confused, Boogie Nights, Anchorman and HBO's Vinyl – there’s been a pronounced pop cultural tendency to reduce the 1970s to little more than a fabulous parade of campy signifiers like mirrored disco balls, brightly-painted muscle cars, platform shoes, bellbottomed jeans, tube tops, Afro hairdos, pornstaches and piles of cocaine.

It's an understandable impulse, of course. (Who doesn't love Afros or piles of cocaine?) But taking such a superficial approach to the seventies means glossing over the grittier, »

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‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer: First Look at the Return of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper — Watch

13 January 2017 2:15 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

After the recent news that the “Twin Peaks” revival has finally landed a premiere date, we now have our first real look at the show’s long-awaited return — and it’s every bit as off-kilter and enigmatic as you’d imagine. Watch the teaser below, featuring a glimpse of Kyle MacLachlan reprising his role as FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Hints What Laura Palmer Has to Do With the Showtime Revival

David Lynch (and, by extension, Mark Frost) has been characteristically tight-lipped about what this upcoming batch of episodes — the first since “Twin Peaks” was canceled after its disappointing second season in 1991 — will entail, making this new footage our first substantive indication of what to expect. Not seen here, unfortunately, are all the original cast members who are still with us but not involved in the show’s third season: Piper Laurie, Lara Flynn Boyle, »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer: First Look at the Return of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper — Watch

13 January 2017 2:15 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After the recent news that the “Twin Peaks” revival has finally landed a premiere date, we now have our first real look at the show’s long-awaited return — and it’s every bit as off-kilter and enigmatic as you’d imagine. Watch the teaser below, featuring a glimpse of Kyle MacLachlan reprising his role as FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Hints What Laura Palmer Has to Do With the Showtime Revival

David Lynch (and, by extension, Mark Frost) has been characteristically tight-lipped about what this upcoming batch of episodes — the first since “Twin Peaks” was canceled after its disappointing second season in 1991 — will entail, making this new footage our first substantive indication of what to expect. Not seen here, unfortunately, are all the original cast members who are still with us but not involved in the show’s third season: Piper Laurie, Lara Flynn Boyle, »

- Michael Nordine

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David Lynch, Kyle MacLachlan Very Lightly Tease Twin Peaks Revival

9 January 2017 5:35 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Twin Peaks co-creator David Lynch made a surprise cameo at the Television Critics Association winter press tour Monday to promote the series’ forthcoming Showtime revival (bowing Sunday, May 21, at 9/8c) and — no surprise — the spoilerphobic auteur dodged nearly every question thrown his way. The key word there being nearly.

RelatedTwin Peaks Cast, Old and New, Talk Up ‘Freshness’ of Showtime Revival

Asked if the events of the prequel film Fire Walk With Me will factor into the 18-episode return, Lynch confirmed that “the story of Laura Palmer’s last seven days are very important for this.” (Hey, it’s something! »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2009

19 items from 2017


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