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The Legend Of The Holy Drinker Starring Rutger Hauer Available on Blu-ray from Arrow Academy September 26th

Director Ermanno Olmi’s The Legend Of The Holy Drinker (1988) Starring Rutger Hauer will be available on Blu-ray from Arrow Academy September 26th

Winner of the prestigious Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival, The Legend Of The Holy DRINKERr is another classic from the great Italian director Ermanno Olmi (Il posto, The Tree of Wooden Clogs).

Adapted from the novella by Joseph Roth, the film tells the story of Andreas Kartack, a homeless man living under the bridges of Paris. Lent 200 francs by an anonymous stranger, he is determined to pay back his debt but circumstances – and his alcoholism – forever intervene.

Working with professional actors for the first time in more than 20 years, Olmi cast Ruger Hauer as Andreas and was rewarded with an astonishing performance of subtlety and depth. Hauer is joined by a superb supporting cast, including Anthony Quayle (Lawrence of Arabia), Sandrine Dumas (The Double Life of Veronique
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Venice 2017. Lineup

ZamaThe programme for the 2017 edition of the Venice Film Festival has been unveiled, and includes new films from Darren Aronofsky, Lucrecia Martel, Frederick Wiseman, Alexander Payne, Hirokazu Kore-eda, Abdellatif Kechiche, Takeshi Kitano and many more.COMPETITIONmother! (Darren Aronofsky)First Reformed (Paul Schrader)Sweet Country (Warwick Thornton)The Leisure Seeker (Paolo Virzi)Una Famiglia (Sebastiano Riso)Ex Libris - The New York Public Library (Frederick Wiseman)Angels Wear White (Vivian Qu)The Whale (Andrea Pallaoro)Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (Martin McDonagh)Foxtrot (Samuel Maoz)Ammore e malavita (Manetti Brothers)Jusqu'a la garde (Xavier Legrand)The Third Murder (Hirokazu Kore-eda)Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno (Abdellatif Kechiche)Lean on Pete (Andrew Haigh)L'insulte (Ziad Doueiri)La Villa (Robert Guediguian)The Shape of Water (Guillermo del Toro)Suburbicon (George Clooney)Human Flow (Ai Weiwei)Downsizing (Alexander Payne)Out Of COMPETITIONFeaturesOur Souls at Night (Ritesh Batra)Il Signor Rotpeter (Antonietta de Lillo)Victoria
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Venice Days lineup: Kim Nguyen, Ermanno Olmi, Chloe Sevigny

  • ScreenDaily
Venice Days lineup: Kim Nguyen, Ermanno Olmi, Chloe Sevigny
Venice sidebar to screen eleven world premieres; first screening of Ermanno Olmi doc.

The Venice Film Festival’s (Aug 30 - 9) independently run Venice Days section will host 12 competition titles, 11 of which are world premieres, including new films from Kim Nguyen, Chloe Sevigny, Pengfei, and Sara Forestier.

War Witch director Nguyen will show drama Eye On Juliet, starring UK actor Joe Cole, while M marks the directorial debut of Standing Tall actress Forestier.

Pengfei, who was in Venice Days in 2015 with his first film, Underground Fragrance, is returning with followup The Taste of Rice Flower (pictured).

Screening in the special events category will be a never seen before and thought to be lost Ermanno Olmi documentary from the 1960s: Il Tentato Suicidio Nell Adolescenza (Attempted Suicide In Youths).

The documentary follows the pioneering work of the emergency psychiatric branch of the Policlinico di Milano.

Meanwhile, new short films by Sevigny and Us choreographer-director Celia Rowlson-Hall will screen in Venice
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Venice Days lineup: Kim Nguyen, Sara Forestier, Chloe Sevigny

  • ScreenDaily
Venice Days lineup: Kim Nguyen, Sara Forestier, Chloe Sevigny
Venice sidebar to screen eleven world premieres; first screening of Ermanno Olmi doc.

The Venice Film Festival’s (Aug 30 - 9) independently run Venice Days section will host 12 competition titles, 11 of which are world premieres, including new films from Kim Nguyen, Chloe Sevigny, Pengfei, and Sara Forestier.

War Witch director Nguyen will show drama Eye On Juliet, starring UK actor Joe Cole, while M marks the directorial debut of Standing Tall actress Forestier.

Pengfei, who was in Venice Days in 2015 with his first film, Underground Fragrance, is returning with followup The Taste of Rice Flower (pictured).

New short films by Sevigny and Us choreographer-director Celia Rowlson-Hall will screen in Venice Days’ Women’s Tales Project, sponsored by Miu Miu, the women’s fashion brand.

Screening in the special events category will be a never seen before and thought to be lost Ermanno Olmi documentary from the ’60s: Il Tentato Suicidio Nell Adolescenza.

Iranian director
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Venice Days: Works by Chloe Sevigny, Canada’s Kim Nguyen, China’s Pengfei in Lineup

Venice Days: Works by Chloe Sevigny, Canada’s Kim Nguyen, China’s Pengfei in Lineup
Rome – The Venice Film Festival’s independently run Venice Days section, modeled on Cannes Directors’ Fortnight, has unveiled a promising lineup mixing known auteurs and potential discoveries, with 11 of 12 competition titles slated for world premieres.

New works from China’s Pengfei; Canada’s Oscar-nominated Kim Nguyen (“War Witch”); Thai auteur Pen-ek Ratanaruang (“Last Life in the Universe”); U.S.-based Iranian artist and filmmaker Shirin Neshat (“Women Without Men”); and Italy’s Vincenzo Marra (“La Prima Luce”) are among competition highlights.

Pengfei, who was in Venice Days in 2015 with his first film, “Underground Fragrance,” is returning with followup “The Taste of Rice Flower” (pictured), a mother/daughter drama set in a village in China’s Yunnan province.

Venice Days will also play an active role in a “Focus on China” film industry forum being held during the fest this year.

Kim will world premiere “Eyes of Juliet,” a love story seen from the point of view of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Tree of Wooden Clogs review – Olmi's neorealist masterpiece

This painterly depiction of Lombardy peasant life, with its unfolding, interwoven stories portrayed over a broad canvas, is magnificent in its authenticity

Cinema’s last great work of neorealism emerged almost 40 years ago: Ermanno Olmi’s L’Albero degli Zoccoli, or The Tree of Wooden Clogs was the Palme d’Or winner at Cannes in 1978 and now gets a cinema re-release. (The Tree of Clogs is probably a simpler, better translation of the title; the wood involved means the sole or lower part of the shoe, going a little over the toe.)

At close to three hours, Olmi’s dark, slow and mysterious masterpiece needs some acclimatisation time; it needs an investment of audience attention so that the emotional connection can be made. For the first act, it is a little opaque and forbidding, but the fairground scene in the middle unlocks the film’s energy, and the final sequences
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

What Are You Watching?: Movies vs. guns

What Are You Watching? is a weekly space for The A.V Club’s film critics and readers to share their thoughts, observations, and opinions on movies new and old.

Funny how that happens. Out of all the movies I’ve watched for non-work-related reasons in the past few weeks, the two I thought were the most interesting both used the deadliness of firearms as an important metaphor. The first of these was The Profession Of Arms—a demanding, persuasive, very smart Italian historical film about 16th-century European warfare, made in 2001 by Ermanno Olmi (The Tree Of Wooden Clogs, Il Posto), a post-neorealist whose name recognition in the United States probably exceeds his viewership. I have a nagging suspicion that I myself have never given the man his proper due. In watching The Profession Of Arms, the first things a viewer learns about political life in the Europe of ...
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New to Streaming: ‘The Age of Shadows,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Small Crimes,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Age of Shadows (Kim Jee-woon)

Eyebrows were raised when it was announced that South Korea will submit the as-yet-unreleased espionage thriller The Age of Shadows for Oscar consideration instead of Cannes hits The Handmaiden and The Wailing. Premiering out of competition at the 73rd Venice Film Festival, writer/director Jee-woon Kim’s return to Korean-language cinema after a brief stint in Hollywood with the Schwarzenegger-starrer The Last Stand
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Maurice’ 4K Restoration Exclusive Trailer & Poster: James Ivory’s Gay-Themed Drama Returns to the Big Screen 30 Years Later

‘Maurice’ 4K Restoration Exclusive Trailer & Poster: James Ivory’s Gay-Themed Drama Returns to the Big Screen 30 Years Later
It’s been 30 years since we last saw James Wilby and Hugh Grant fall in love on the screen in James Ivory’s beautiful gay-themed film “Maurice.” Now, Cohen Media Group —which has acquired 30 titles from the Merchant Ivory Productions library— is releasing a brand new 4K restoration of the 1987 romantic drama, which will screen next month at New York City’s historic Quad Cinema, following the theater’s reopening this Friday, April 14.

Read More: ‘Behind the White Glasses’ Exclusive Clip and Poster: Documentary Chronicles the Career of Lina Wertmüller — Watch

Based on E.M. Forster’s 1971 novel by the same name, “Maurice” followed the story of two undergraduate Cambridge students, Maurice (Wilby) and Clive (Grant), who fall in love at a time when any reference of homosexuality at the English university was omitted and same-sex relationships was punishable by the law.

The film also starred Rupert Graves and Ben Kingsleyco.
See full article at Indiewire »

Sixth Iff Panama Reinforces Its Position in Central America

When Iff Panama launched in 2012, the Panamanian film industry was slowly ticking over and the link between Panama and the world of cinema was limited to the occasional U.S. or international feature film shot in the country.

But over the past 5 years, under fest director, Pituka Ortega Heilbron and artistic director, Diana Sanchez, Iff Panama has secured its place as, without doubt, one of the most important festivals in Central America and the Caribbean. Along the way the fest has also helped consolidate the nascent Panamanian film industry.

By building a bridge between Central America and the Caribbean, the festival has also helped create a critical mass of films and filmmakers in the region which is feeding into new development.

These achievements were particularly evident at this year’s 6th edition, as highlighted an increased industry presence and attraction of key filmmakers from throughout Latin America-

The 3rd Primera
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rushes. Wes Anderson, Chicago's Crime Culture, Nicole Kidman, Walter Hill

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSRadley Metzger's The Lickerish QuartetRadley Metzger, whose groundbreaking erotic films helped set standards of style for both mainstream and arthouse cinema, has died at 88. His classics Camille 2000 (1969) and The Lickerish Quartet (1970) were featured on Mubi last year. Critic and programmer Steve Macfarlane interviewed the director at Slant Magazine for the Film Society of Lincoln Center's 2014 retrospective devoted to Metzger.Recommended VIEWINGThe Cinémathèque française has been on a roll uploading video discussions that have taken place at their Paris cinema. This 34 minute talk is between Wes Anderson and director/producer Barbet Schroeder.The Criterion Collection has recently released a new edition of Michelangelo Antonioni's masterpiece Blow-Up, and has uploaded this stellar clip of actor David Hemmings speaking on a talk show about making the film.Recommended READINGHoward Hawks' ScarfaceHow does Chicago intertwine itself with crime and the culture created in the mix of the two?
See full article at MUBI »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Tree of Wooden Clogs

Ermanno Olmi’s three-hour saga is a masterful ethnographic recreation of the long-gone way of life of Italian tenant farmers, virtual slaves working for a landowner. We see the entire agrarian lifestyle, with hints of modern times on the way. An ever-present backdrop of spiritualism and faith keeps the laborers going. Using unprofessional actors and an obsolete dialect, this is listed as one of the great Italian films of the 1970s.

The Tree of Wooden Clogs

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 854

1978 / Color / 1:33 flat full frame / 187 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 14, 2017 / 39.95

Photographed & Edited by Ermanno Olmi

Sets: Enrico Tovaglieri

Costumes: Francesca Zucchelli

Produced by Attillio Torricelli

Written and Directed by Ermanno Olmi

Some filmmakers move quietly from show to show, until a project comes along that’s hailed as a career masterpiece. For Italian Ermanno Olmi the film is The Tree of Wooden Clogs (L’albero degli
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Blu-ray Review: The Tree Of Wooden Clogs, Far From a Wooden Slog

"I'm going to find a tree to chop down." That line, perhaps familiar from another film released by Criterion, Moonrise Kingdom, also applies to this new release by the company, respected Italian director Ermanno Olmi's 1978 Palme D'or winner, The Tree of Wooden Clogs. Like Bill Murray in the afore-referenced Wes Anderson fave, Tree also features a despondent father with a literal ax to grind as part of its sprawling ensemble. Except, Olmi's makeshift lumberjack is no laughing matter. He dare not utter of his tree chopping. He has his reasons; reasons which prove impactful and costly. Olmi's The Tree of Wooden Clogs is, like Malick's The New World, one of those rare period films that has built its world so well, it's easy to...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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Scott Reviews Ermanno Olmi’s The Tree of Wooden Clogs [Criterion Blu-ray Review]

As the art film revolution of the late 1950s and 1960s gave way to more populist manifestations of its stylistic inventions, so too did the “foreign language drama” become a codified form. As Bergman, Antonioni, Kurosawa, Fellini, and other renowned directors of that earlier time aged out of their peak years of financial viability, a new class found a framework in which to ground their career. They didn’t always have the training in commercial art that their forerunners had worked in and helped develop before eventually resisting, subverting, or overthrowing, but they had the stamina and the work ethic to invest in the trappings that made earlier more revolutionary works so galvanizing.

Ermanno Olmi made his start in documentary shorts, making more than two dozen from 1953-1959, before making his feature narrative debut with Time Stood Still (1959), an avalanche drama about a generational divide. He gained considerably more acclaim for 1961’s Il Posto,
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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze
See full article at The Film Stage »

Joshua Reviews Ermanno Olmi’s The Tree Of Wooden Clogs [Theatrical Review]

The brand of Janus Films means a hell of a lot in the art and repertory film world. Be it their promotion of new releases like the stunning Cameraperson or their support of touring film series like that devoted to Charlie Chaplin or the Wim Wenders road pictures, one sees the name Janus Films and the gorgeous logo and instantly an understanding of either the quality or the cultural import of what one is about to watch is instilled. And that’s what makes Janus throwing support behind a seemingly forgotten film, an award winning picture that’s all but disappeared in the public eye, is so important.

That’s exactly the case when talking about their latest repertory offering. A Palme d’Or winning epic, director Ermanno Olmi saw great success with his gorgeous and sprawling The Tree Of Wooden Clogs in 1978, but as is the case with much
See full article at CriterionCast »

Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ Trilogy Finally Comes to Criterion This February, Plus Pedro Almodóvar and Kirsten Johnson Titles

Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ Trilogy Finally Comes to Criterion This February, Plus Pedro Almodóvar and Kirsten Johnson Titles
While we celebrate Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Punch Drunk Love” coming to The Criterion Collection today, more amazing news arrives in the form of February new additions, which just so happens to include a box set that is bound to cause some major swooning from Richard Linklater fans.

The director’s seminal “Before” Trilogy, which includes “Before Sunrise” (1995), “Before Sunset” (2004) and “Before Midnight” (2013), will finally join the Criterion library, which cinephiles expected would happen sooner than later after “Boyhood” joined the collection in October. Rumors started swirling last summer about a potential box set, and now Criterion has confirmed the release.

Read More: ‘Before’ Trilogy: Beautiful Video Shows Parallel Emotion From All Three of Linklater’s Films

The “Before” Trilogy Criterion set includes restored 2K digital transfers of the first two installments and a 2K digital master of “Before Midnight,” all approved by director Richard Linklater. Behind-the-scenes content includes “Dream is Destiny,
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ Trilogy and More Coming to The Criterion Collection in February

Update: The Before Trilogy on Criterion is currently $39.95. Pre-order while you can.

After The Criterion Collection hinted at it and some of the own crew confirmed it, it’s now been officially revealed that one of their most-requested releases will be arriving next year. Richard Linklater‘s Before trilogy will be joining the colelction just a few weeks after Valentine’s Day, on February 28th, featuring new 2K restorations of Before Sunrise and Before Sunset as well as Before Midnight.

Special features include a new discussion with Linklater, Julie Delpy, and Ethan Hawke, moderated by Kent Jones, and Athina Rachel Tsangari’s documentary on the making of the most recent feature. There’s also the full feature-length documentary Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny, and more. While we’re still waiting on cover art for the Linklater set, check out the full details on February’s line-up below, also including one
See full article at The Film Stage »

Criterion in October 2016: A Feast of Guillermo del Toro, Euro Classics, Boyhood and Short Cuts

Debuting ten years ago, Pan's Labyrinth remains a gorgeous, haunting masterpiece, the best film Guillermo del Toro has directed so far. In October, it will be added to the Criterion Collection with a newly graded 2K digital master and new supplemental features; it should look spectacular. The film will also be packaged together with two other directorial efforts by del Toro that have previously been released individually by Criterion, Cronos and The Devil's Backbone. The package is titled Trilogia de Guillermo del Toro and includes various new extras; the Blu-ray edition includes a 100-page hardcover book, featuring new essays, production notes and sketches. Two European classics are also heading for release in October. Ermanno Olmi's The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978) won the Palme d'Or...

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