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Michael Apted to Head Camerimage Competition Jury

Michael Apted to Head Camerimage Competition Jury
British documentarian Michael Apted, who broke ground with decades-long chronicles of subjects’ lives, will chair the Camerimage fest main competition jury, the organization has announced.

Heather Stewart, creative director at the British Film Institute, and cinematographers Christian Berger (“The White Ribbon”), Stuart Dryburgh (“The Piano”), Stephen Goldblatt (“Lethal Weapon”), Karl Walter Lindenlaub (“Independence Day”) and Anastas N. Michos (“Man on the Moon”) will also serve, evaluating the best in world cinematography Nov. 11-18 in Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Director-producer Brad Silberling (“City of Angels”) will lead the Polish films competition jury, alongside cinematographers Andrew Dunn (“The Bodyguard”), Denis Lenoir (“Demonlover”), Claudio Miranda (“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”) and VFX supervisor Mark H. Weingartner (“Inception”).

Last year’s docu prize achievement winner Jay Rosenblatt (“Human Remains”) will preside over the docu features jury, serving with writer-producer-director Sheila Curran Bernard (“Slavery by Another Name”), Dp John Davey (“La danse”), producer Karen Konicek (Zipporah Films) and director-producer Kristine Samuelson (“Arthur and Lillie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘The Age of Shadows,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Small Crimes,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Age of Shadows (Kim Jee-woon)

Eyebrows were raised when it was announced that South Korea will submit the as-yet-unreleased espionage thriller The Age of Shadows for Oscar consideration instead of Cannes hits The Handmaiden and The Wailing. Premiering out of competition at the 73rd Venice Film Festival, writer/director Jee-woon Kim’s return to Korean-language cinema after a brief stint in Hollywood with the Schwarzenegger-starrer The Last Stand
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cinema Eye Honors 2017 Winners List: ‘Cameraperson’ and ‘O.J.: Made in America’ Lead Awards

Cinema Eye Honors 2017 Winners List: ‘Cameraperson’ and ‘O.J.: Made in America’ Lead Awards
Awards season keeps ticking right along, but tonight’s Cinema Eye Honors promised at least a tiny respite from narrative-based filmmaking, as the New York City-set ceremony is all about honoring the best in the year’s documentary filmmaking.

Big winners included Kirsten Johnson’s “Cameraperson,” which picked up Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking, along with editing and cinematography wins. Right behind it was Ezra Edelman’s “O.J.: Made in America,” which earned Edelman a directing win, along with a production win for Edelman and Caroline Waterlow. Best TV offering went to “Making a Murderer.”

Nominations were lead by Raoul Peck’s “I Am Not Your Negro” and “O.J.: Made in America,” which each pulled in five nominations apiece, though Johnson’s “Cameraperson” and Gianfranco Rosi’s “Fire at Sea” aren’t far behind, with four nominations each. Both Peck and Rosi’s features ultimately walked away without an award.
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Steven Okazaki Talks Mifune: The Last Samurai (Exclusive)

  • ShockYa
Being a revolutionary pioneer in a particular field of work should be an accomplishment that’s continuously celebrated. Unfortunately, not all visionaries receive the praise they deserve for launching an honored way of life into mainstream society. That’s regrettably the case with actor Toshiro Mifune, who began to garner fame in the late 1940s after he served in World War II. In Oscar-winning filmmaker Steven Okazaki’s new documentary, ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai,’ the performer is highlighted as not only being the first international Asian, but overall nonwhite, star who garnered worldwide attention in the action genre. While Mifune’s work has left lasting impressions on dedication genre fans, the majority of the [ Read More ]

The post Interview: Steven Okazaki Talks Mifune: The Last Samurai (Exclusive) appeared first on Shockya.com.
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Film Review: ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’

Film Review: ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’
Mifune: The Last Samurai,” a dutiful and diverting but rather bare-bones documentary portrait, opens with a series of clips and photographs of Toshiro Mifune, the scowling-eyed Japanese actor who became, in effect, the world’s first action star. The first clip, from “Rashomon,” looks even more transgressive today than it did in 1950: It’s of Mifune’s scruffy medieval bandit forcing himself at knifepoint on a maiden he discovers in the woods. In the other clips, we see him leaping, glowering, slashing, grunting, cackling maniacally, facing down armies of sword fighters, and appearing just as volatile when he’s the victim, twitching to and fro like a gnarly demon as he evades a shower of arrows. The montage ends with a photograph of what looks like a different human being entirely: It’s Mifune relaxing at home, elegant and debonair, with a handsome warm smile and eyes that crinkle just so,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Review: Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg Honor Japanese Cinema Legend

  • The Wrap
‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Review: Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg Honor Japanese Cinema Legend
The image of Toshiro Mifune wielding a samurai sword, eyes glaring at his foe, is among the first images to come to most American filmgoers’s minds when they think about Japanese cinema. And rightfully so. Mifune is perhaps the only iconic Japanese actor to achieve international fame, and for a period in the 50s and 60s, he was the biggest movie star in Japan, thanks largely to a series of samurai epics directed by his frequent collaborator Akira Kurosawa. Together, they brought Japanese cinema onto the world stage. Steven Okazaki’s “Mifune: The Last Samurai” is as much a documentary about the Golden.
See full article at The Wrap »

Documentary ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Is An Engaging Look At The Life Of A Legend [Review]

It’s hard to talk about Toshiro Mifune without mentioning Akira Kurosawa. And it’s hard to talk about Mifune and Kurosawa without discussing their revelatory impact on cinema as we know it today. Which, in a way, is exactly what “Mifune: The Last Samurai,” the new documentary from Steven Okazaki, seeks to explore: just who was Toshiro Mifune and how did a boy from such humble beginnings wind up becoming one of film’s most influential figures?

Continue reading Documentary ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Is An Engaging Look At The Life Of A Legend [Review] at The Playlist.
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The Many Faces Of Mifune Toshiro

This week sees the American premiere of Steven Okazaki's documentary Mifune: The Last Samurai, about probably the most famous Japanese actor of all time: Mifune Toshiro. In his review Patryk Czekaj calls it "...a perfectly informative and well-researched documentary that should satisfy both true fans of Japanese cinema and total newcomers." Mifune Toshiro was a veritable force of nature before the camera (and apparently, sometimes also when Not in front of a camera...), and when will we ever get a better opportunity to dedicate a quiz to him? So once again I'm going to use fourteen pictures of one of my favourite thespians to make a quiz. Click through the images and guess which movies or shows they're from. No competition, no prizes, just for...

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‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Review: A Painfully Safe Documentary About One Of Cinema’s Most Explosive Stars

  • Indiewire
‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Review: A Painfully Safe Documentary About One Of Cinema’s Most Explosive Stars
Over the course of his legendary acting career, Toshiro Mifune was a samurai, a stray dog, and a shoe tycoon. He was a muse for one of the greatest filmmakers of the 20th Century, a beacon for Japanese cinema, and a howling ambassador for the entire country and its culture. He was a feral force of nature who prized combustion over control, a wild gust of wind whose energy only a precious few collaborators knew how to harness. He was even, according to his daughter, almost Obi-Wan Kenobi.

The one thing that Toshiro Mifune wasn’t — wasn’t even capable of being — was boring. At least not on screen. At least not until now.

A thin, dull, and by-the-numbers biography that fails to capture its subject’s irrepressible spirit or properly contextualize his importance, Steven Okazaki’s “Mifune: The Last Samurai” might have made for a solid bonus feature on a Criterion Collection DVD,
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Mifune: The Last Samurai Pays Tribute to an Electrifying Actor

Undeniably the most recognizable and prominent actor in the history of Japanese cinema, Mifune Toshiro has not only influenced generations of young performers, who passionately aspire to follow in his footsteps even nowadays, but also forever changed the perception of the country’s film scene both at home and overseas. Award-winning writer-director Steven Okazaki’s highly anticipated documentary, which already premiered at Venice and Telluride earlier this year, pays tribute to Mifune by presenting a turbulent yet truly inspiring life story of a man who – fortuitously but with great confidence – gained international star status never before known to a domestic actor and, with the support and guidance of his longtime collaborator and mentor Kurosawa Akira, created an impressive number of performances that will surely electrify...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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Toshiro Mifune: The First Non-White Movie Hero — Interview

Toshiro Mifune: The First Non-White Movie Hero — Interview
The modern movie hero owes a great debt to Toshiro Mifune, the longtime Akira Kurosawa star who provided a ferocious centerpiece to everything from “Seven Samurai” to “Yojimbo.” Steven Okazaki’s documentary “Mifune” chronicles the scope of the actor’s sprawling career as well as his lasting cultural impact. The filmmaker spoke to IndieWire about his interest in Mifune, gathering interviews with filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese, and why more people should be appreciating Mifune’s legacy as “the first movie hero who wasn’t a white guy.

Read More: ‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Trailer: Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg Sing the Legendary Actor’s Praises

A version of this interview was original published at the Telluride Film Festival, where “Mifune” premiered this fall. The film opens November 25 at the IFC Center in New York with more cities to follow.

When did you first encounter Mifune’s performances?
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review: Mifune: The Last Samurai analyzes the universal appeal of a Japanese actor

Given that the Toshiro Mifune biographical documentary Mifune: The Last Samurai is only 80 minutes long, it’s a bold choice by director Steven Okazaki to wait until 15 minutes into the film to get to the birth of the man himself. The doc’s introductory passages don’t trace Mifune’s family lineage; instead, they cover the importance of the samurai to Japanese history and popular culture, and trace the origins of the “chanbara” film to the earliest days of cinema. Named to evoke the sound of swords clashing against swords, chanbara pictures relied on stock characters and situations to retell the tales of Japan’s past, as an expression of what the nation saw as its core values. When Mifune teamed up with director Akira Kurosawa for a series of revisionist samurai films in the ’50s and ’60s, they found receptive audiences all over the world for a ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Cinema Eye Honors Nominees Announced: ‘Oj Made in America,’ ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Lead with Five Each

  • Indiewire
Cinema Eye Honors Nominees Announced: ‘Oj Made in America,’ ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Lead with Five Each
The nominees for the 10th annual Cinema Eye Honors have been announced, with “I Am Not Your Negro” and “Oj: Made in America” both receiving five each. They’re followed in short order by “Cameraperson” and “Fire at Sea,” which along with “Weiner” are all in contention for the top prize. A total of 37 features and five shorts will be in contention at the upcoming ceremony, which “Hoop Dreams” director Steve James will host from the Museum of the Moving Image on January 11. Here’s the full list of nominees:

Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Feature Filmmaking

Cameraperson” (Kirsten Johnson)

“Fire at Sea” (Gianfranco Rosi)

I Am Not Your Negro” (Raoul Peck)

“Oj: Made in America” (Ezra Edelman)

Weiner” (Josh Kriegman and Elyse Steinberg)

Outstanding Achievement in Direction

Kirsten Johnson, “Cameraperson

Gianfranco Rosi, “Fire at Sea”

Raoul Peck, “I Am Not Your Negro

Robert Greene, “Kate Plays Christine

Ezra Edelman, “Oj:
See full article at Indiewire »

15 Films to See in November

We recently provided a guide to streaming the best films of 2016, but it’s time to hit pause because the theatrical options this month are stellar. Along with the year’s best film thus far, there’s a wide variety of must-see features, from documentaries to animations to sci-fi dramas to innovative experiments.

Matinees to See: Doctor Strange (11/4), Peter and the Farm (11/4), The Monster (11/11), Seasons (11/11), The Love Witch (11/11), Notes on Blindness (11/16), Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them (11/18), Bleed For This (11/18), I Am Not Madame Bovary (11/18), Lion (11/25), Evolution (11/25), and Old Stone (11/30)

15. Billy Lynn’s Halftime Walk (Ang Lee; Nov. 11)

Synopsis: 19-year-old Billy Lynn is brought home for a victory tour after a harrowing Iraq battle.

Trailer

Why You Should See It: After its mixed reception at Nyff, I probably shouldn’t be looking forward to Ang Lee‘s latest as much as I am. However, I’m always curious as
See full article at The Film Stage »

Toshiro Mifune Celebrated in “Mifune: The Last Samurai”

Toshiro Mifune is not a stranger to samurai movie lovers. A veteran of nearly 170 movies, his collaboration with filmmaker Akira Kurosawa is often cited as the catalyst for the Golden Age of Japanese Cinema post-wwii. Three films from their collaborative effort – “Rashomon”, “The Seven Samurai” and “Yojimbo” – remains internationally influential up to this day.

Nearly 19 years after the iconic actor’s passing, fans will soon be able to revisit their favorite samurai with the release of the documentary “Mifune: The Last Samurai”.

Directed by Acadamy-Award winner Steven Okazaki, “Mifune: The Last Samurai” is narrated by Keanu Reeves. The documentary also features interviews and tributes from Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorcese, and interviews with members of Mifune and Kurosawa family.

Mifune: The Last Samurai” is set for release on November 25.

Source: IndieWire.com
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Trailer Chronicles Incredible Life of the Legendary Actor — Watch

‘Mifune: The Last Samurai’ Trailer Chronicles Incredible Life of the Legendary Actor — Watch
To star in nearly 170 films in your career is an incredible feat, and to have your performances influence the works of Hollywood giants like Clint Eastwood and George Lucas is almost unimaginable. That is, unless, you’re Toshiro Mifune.

Read More: 5 Things You May Not Know About Akira Kurosawa’s ‘Seven Samurai

From Academy Award-winning director Steven Okazaki comes “Mifune: The Last Samurai,” a new documentary that chronicles the life of the famed Japanese actor, narrated by Keanu Reaves. Included in his resume are “Rashomon” and “Seven Samurai” (two of the sixteen collaborations with director Akira Kurosawa), and Hiroshi Inagaki’s “Samurai Trilogy.”

In the latest trailer for the upcoming film, fellow actors, directors and film aficionados discuss Mifune’s incredible impact on both Japanese and American cinema, as well as the actor’s battle with alcoholism. Included in the film are interviews with Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, who notes,
See full article at Indiewire »

[Lff Review] Mifune: The Last Samurai

Mifune: The Last Samurai, the well-assembled documentary on the life of actor Toshirô Mifune, the long-time Akira Kurosawa collaborator, should be a worthy introduction to one of Japanese cinema’s greatest icons, if a little light on more revelatory findings. With a softly-spoken narration by Keanu Reeves and talking heads from the likes of Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, as well as the sons of both Mifune and Kurosawa, Mifune offers a personal and professional tribute to an actor who reinvented the hero for a post-World War II age.

Mifune, the preeminent Japanese actor of his generation, had starring roles in some of the iconic samurai movies of the country’s golden age – including Rashomon, Seven Samurai, Throne of Blood and Yojimbo – and influenced a host of American icons from Clint Eastwood’s Man With No Name to Darth Vader (Mifune was supposedly offered Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars). Director
See full article at The Film Stage »

If You Love Martial Arts Films Watch This Trailer for Mifune: The Last Samurai Doc

If you're a fan of classic martial arts films there's no doubt that you know the name Toshiro Mifune. Over the course of his career, he made 16 incredible films with director Akira Kurosawa, which include classics such as Rashomon, Seven Samurai, and Yojimbo. These films inspired some of America's classic westerns including The Magnificent Seven, Clint Eastwood’s A Fistful of Dollars, and of course, George LucasStar Wars.

A trailer has been released for a great looking new documentary called Mifune: The Last Samurai directed by Steven Okazaki, which "explores the accidental movie career of Toshiro Mifune, one of the true giants of world cinema." When talking about Mifune, director Steven Spielberg says, “A lot of people try to imitate Mifune, especially when they’re playing strong and silent but nobody can. He was unique in all the world.”

The film has only been playing in film festivals around the world.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Check Out the New Trailer and Poster For Mifune: The Last Samurai

Nearly 20 years after his death, Toshiro Mifune remains a true giant of world cinema. He made 16 remarkable films with director Akira Kurosawa, including Rashomon, Seven Samurai and Yojimbo, and together they shook the film world, inspiring not only The Magnificent Seven and Clint Eastwood’s breakthrough movie, A Fistful of Dollars, but also George LucasStar Wars.

Mifune: The Last Samurai, the new feature-length documentary by Academy Award-winning filmmaker Steven Okazaki, explores the evolution of the samurai film; Mifune’s childhood and World War II experience; his accidental entry into the movies; and dynamic but sometimes turbulent collaboration with Kurosawa.

Mifune – wry, charismatic and deadly — was the first non-white action star. “A lot of people try to imitate Mifune, especially when they’re playing strong and silent,” says Steven Spielberg, “ but nobody can. He was unique in all the world.”

The new trailer for Mifune: The Last Samurai looks amazing:
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Mifune: The Last Samurai: Watch The Trailer, See The New Poster

Steven Okazaki's documentary Mifune: The Last Samurai will begin it's theatrical run in the U.S. in November. On November 25th it opens in New York at the IFC Center followed by Los Angeles on December 2nd and San Francisco on December 9th. There is a new trailer and a poster for the release from Strand Releasing. You can see both below. Nearly 20 years after his death, Toshiro Mifune remains a true giant of world cinema. He made 16 remarkable films with director Akira Kurosawa, including Rashomon, Seven Samurai and Yojimbo, and together they shook the film world, inspiring not only The Magnificent Seven and Clint Eastwood’s breakthrough movie, A Fistful of Dollars, but also George LucasStar Wars. Mifune: The Last...

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