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Simon Oakland Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (8) | Salary (1)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 28 August 1915New York City, New York, USA
Date of Death 29 August 1983Cathedral City, California, USA  (cancer)
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

One of the movies' most memorable tough guys, Simon Oakland actually began his career as a concert violinist, turning to acting in the late 1940s. After a long string of roles in Broadway hits, including "Light Up the Sky," "The Shrike" and "Inherit the Wind," Oakland made his film debut as the tough but compassionate journalist who speaks up for Susan Hayward's "Barbara Graham" in I Want to Live! (1958). He would go on to play a long series of tough guy types, albeit usually on the right side of the law, in such films as The Sand Pebbles (1966), Tony Rome (1967), Psycho (1960), and, most notably, nasty Lieutenant Schrank in West Side Story (1961). He was also a frequently seen face on TV, at one point serving as a regular or semi-regular on four different series at once. Much respected by his co-workers as a total professional, he died, after a long battle with cancer, one day after his 68th birthday.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Bob Sorrentino

Spouse (1)

Lois (? - 29 August 1983) (his death) (1 child)

Trivia (8)

Until the 1940s, he was a concert violinist.
Through his career, he performed on Broadway.
He made his film debut as the "tough, but compassionate" journalist who speaks up for Susan Hayward's "Barbara Graham" in I Want to Live! (1958). He would wind up playing this type often over the course of his career.
He went on to play a long series of tough guy types, usually on the right side of the law (or in positions of authority), most notably in Psycho (1960), West Side Story (1961) and as Antonio Vincenzo (Kolchak's boss) in the sci-fi TV series Kolchak: The Night Stalker (1974). A gifted actor, he often accepted roles that were inferior to his acting ability and often played on type rather than talent. He was highly respected by his co-workers as an actor; he died of cancer, one day after his 68th birthday.
A frequent traveler by air between New York and California.
Maintained dual residences in both New York and Hollywood so that he could maintain his career in both theater and movies.
He was often confused with Claude Akins, whom he resembled.
He died only three days after his Twilight Zone: The Thirty-Fathom Grave (1963) co-star Mike Kellin.

Salary (1)

Psycho (1960) $1,000

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