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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

11 items from 2012


The League Review: Double Friend-Off

6 December 2012 11:55 PM, PST | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

Friends. Sometimes they love us. Sometimes they hurt us. Sometimes they lift us up in our hour of sorrow, and other times, they take advantage of us after we have had outpatient butt surgery. These are the eternal issues that The League examined during its epic double-episode tonight.

I know that "The Anchor Baby" and "Bro-Lo El Cordero" were doubled up just so the network could air all of this show's episodes before mid-season, but they made a lot of sense when viewed together. In these combined 40-odd minutes, the real issue at the heart of The League--when everyone you love is a childish, self-involved maniac, who can you really trust?--came to a fever pitch, with a surprising moment of catharsis (followed by yet another let-down) for poor Dr. Andre.

"The Anchor Baby" let Ruxin, who's been a bit on the back burner this season, take glorious center stage as he obsessed over Sofia, »

- gabrielle.moss@gmail.com (Gabrielle Moss)

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Amy Adams: 'I'm so not the princess type'

22 November 2012 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Amy Adams has ditched the ingenue roles for unforgettable turns in classy awards fodder from big-name directors – and now she has worked with Clint Eastwood in Trouble With the Curve

It's an absolutely archetypal American face; you can read a multitude into it. Look long enough at Amy Adams' pre-Raphaelite cascade of orange-red hair, her pale complexion – with its susceptibility, no doubt, to freckles and sunburn – the upturned chin, the tough-cookie set jaw, and the slender sloping nose, and soon enough you will discern the possibilities: Anne of Green Gables, Annie, if she was still young enough, or one of Willa Cather's doughty Nebraska Plainswomen – Thea Kronberg, perhaps, from The Song of The Lark – Dorothea Lange's Migrant Mother, eyes fixed for ever on the middle distance, or any number of western farmwives or lady-gunfighters. Take names from Henry James or Edith WhartonDaisy Miller, Undine Spragg – and Adams »

- John Patterson

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Simon Curtis Launches "The Buccaneers"

8 October 2012 9:01 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Simon Curtis ("My Week With Marilyn") is in talks to direct an adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel "Buccaneers" for Ruby Films says Variety.

Set in London during a time when it was fashionable to marry for social position rather than romantic love, the story follows a group of American women seeking English husbands.

Alison Owen and Faye Ward will produce. Shooting aims to begin during the second quarter of next year. »

- Garth Franklin

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My Week With Marilyn Director In Talks For Adaptation Of Edith Wharton's Buccanners

8 October 2012 7:44 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Director Simon Curtis may have found a new project to make following the success of last year.s My Week With Marilyn. The filmmaker is now in talks for an adaptation of Buccaneers, based on the final, unfinished book by Edith Wharton. THR reports that BBC Films and Ruby Films are both on to produce and that playwright and screenwriter Heidi Thomas has taken care of the script. It should be noted that she will not be working from an incomplete novel, as Marion Mainwaring, a Wharton scholar, wrote an ending in 1993. Much like many of Wharton.s works, the story is set in high society and .follows five wealthy American girls who, unable to find mates in New York, set off for England in search of well-off gentleman bachelors.. The story has been adapted once before, but that was as a miniseries for the BBC in the mid-90s. »

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Tiff Capsule Review: 'Fill the Void'

10 September 2012 5:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In the ultra-orthodox world of Jerusalem, Shira is 18 and plays the accordion in a kindergarten, and her family wants her to marry. She and her mother have their eyes on a handsome young man, but things get complicated when her older sister, Esther, dies in childbirth, and Esther’s husband, solemn, bearded Yochay, the father of a new baby, becomes the next eligible man. Director Rama Burshtein, the first woman from a Hasidic background to make a feature film, views Shira’s predicament from inside a religious community. Unlike the exposures of abuse and oppression that can be found in recent documentaries about women forced by orthodox men to follow the strictest of rules, "Fill the Void" operates more like a story by Edith Wharton about a woman pressured to grow up quickly in the only world she knows. As men and women meet -- separately, of course -- to »

- David D'Arcy

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Dallas Scoop: Jordana Brewster's Getting a [Spoiler] in Season 2!

27 August 2012 1:49 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

There’s a forecast for rising temperatures on Season 2 of TNT’s Dallas reboot, as the show’s producers are planning to add two scorching series regulars to the cast.

First up is the role of Andres Ramos, the estranged older brother of Jordana Brewster’s Elena (pictured). Andres is described as being in his early-to-mid 30s, Hispanic, sexy and with a “great body.” (Um, this is Dallas, of course he wasn’t going to have a spare tire and chicken legs!)

Known by his close associates as “Drew,” Elena’s bro has a big personality and a little bit »

- Michael Slezak

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Gore Vidal Dead At 86

31 July 2012 10:28 PM, PDT | Huffington Post | See recent Huffington Post news »

In a world more to his liking, Gore Vidal might have been president, or even king. He had an aristocrat's bearing – tall, handsome and composed – and an authoritative baritone ideal for summoning an aide or courtier.

But Vidal made his living – a very good living – from challenging power, not holding it. He was wealthy and famous and committed to exposing a system often led by men he knew firsthand. During the days of Franklin Roosevelt, one of the few leaders whom Vidal admired, he might have been called a "traitor to his class." The real traitors, Vidal would respond, were the upholders of his class.

The author, playwright, politician and commentator whose vast and sharpened range of published works and public remarks were stamped by his immodest wit and unconventional wisdom, died Tuesday at age 86 in Los Angeles.

Vidal died at his home in the Hollywood Hills at about 6:45 p. »

- AP

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Hannah Fidell And “A Teacher” At Us-in-progress, Part Two

11 June 2012 12:10 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

June 8, 2012 (continued)

9pm – The dinner and award announcement are held above the Renault car company’s showroom, which seems like a strange place but the food was absolutely delicious and included the second of three steak dinners I will have while in France. Sophie Dulac, the grande dame of Parisian cinema, and her beautiful entourage arrive. She announces that A Teacher has won and Kim and I do this really cliché slow-motion turn to look at each other, not really comprehending the win until people urge us to go up. Four years of studying French in school finally pays off when I’m asked to address the other dinner guests in their native tongue. I give a brief speech that went a little something like this: “Merci Beaucoup.” We take a ton of awkward celebratory photos and head back to the Publicis Groupe’s rooftop for another drink.

11:30pm »

- Hannah Fidell

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A Trailer Arrives for Short Story Collection Shadows: Supernatural Tales by Masters of Modern Literature

20 April 2012 11:02 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

A few months ago we brought to your attention the short story collection Shadows: Supernatural Tales by Masters of Modern Literature, and to help refresh your memory, Uninvited Books has released a new trailer featuring editor Robert Dunbar reading from his introduction.

Synopsis:

Shadows: Supernatural Tales by Masters of Modern Literature features terrifying explorations of the dark by many of the great writers who revolutionized dark fiction. These may be the finest, most evocative ghost stories ever written.

The authors include: Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Henry James, Algernon Blackwood, Oliver Onions, Montague Rhodes James, and more.

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- The Woman In Black

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Literary time travel: where would you go?

24 February 2012 4:06 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

With a trip to Paris in the 20s the subject of Woody Allen's Oscar contender, we've been wondering which bookish era we'd most like to revisit

Amid all the noise for The Artist, which looks set to clean up at the Oscars as it did at the Baftas, we on the Guardian books desk are gunning for another cinematic nostalgia-fest harking back to the same period. In the running for Best Picture, but with the bookies only giving it a 100/1 chance of winning, Midnight in Paris has been hailed as a return to form for Woody Allen, and described as a "perfect soufflé" by the Observer film critic Philip French. It might not have a performing dog, but it does have Papa Hemingway in a vest roaring "who wants a fight?" Like The Artist it is a warning against the dangers of romanticising the past as a Golden Age, »

- Lisa Allardice

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The Artist – review

31 December 2011 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

More than a homage to the silent era, Michel Hazanavicius's The Artist is a dazzling tale of love and loss

What better way could one year end and another start than with a pair of charming, funny, moving films celebrating the cinema itself? Three weeks ago Martin Scorsese gave us Hugo, a deeply felt picture about the creation of the cinema in France during the final years of the 19th century. Now the French cineaste Michel Hazanavicius returns the compliment with the complementary The Artist, about the coming of sound to Hollywood. The directors of the Nouvelle Vague were born around the time the talkies began. Hazanavicius was born seven years after Truffaut's Les quatre cents coups and Godard's Breathless but is as steeped in movies as they were. His first feature film, La classe américaine, which I haven't seen, was apparently compiled entirely of clips from old Warner Brothers films, »

- Philip French

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2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007

11 items from 2012


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