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Paul Kaye interview: Dennis Pennis, Game Of Thrones, Zapped

Louisa Mellor Oct 19, 2017

We chatted to actor Paul Kaye about playing wizards, the musical Matilda, and his move from celebrity satire to serious drama…

Main image credit: Jordan Katz-Kaye

“Bitterness, really” is Paul Kaye’s explanation of what drove his satirical red-carpet interviewer Dennis Pennis in the nineties. “I’d hit thirty, I’d sort of failed as a musician, I’d failed as an artist I felt at the time.” Ambushing Hollywood’s elite in the persona of a brash, punk nuisance wasn’t Kaye’s first choice for stardom, he admits. “It wasn’t how I expected to forge a career. Of all the things I thought I’d end up doing, it wasn’t that.”

See related 26 new UK TV shows to look out for 50 upcoming comic book TV shows, and when to expect them

Trained in theatre design, in his twenties Kaye worked as an illustrator
See full article at Den of Geek »

Why Barry Norman mattered so much to me

Simon Brew Sep 15, 2017

The late Barry Norman's impact on many of us, and our love for film, will be felt for decades.

I struggle a bit sometimes, with writing about someone whose work meant the world to me in the immediate aftermath of their death. For one, I’m no fan of the clickbait culture, whereby as soon as a passing is announced, there’s a seeming compulsion to bash out an accompanying top ten list (that's not a slight against those who wrote terrific, long-form personal pieces). But more than that, I find it hard to concentrate my thoughts.

That was particularly the case with Barry Norman, a man without whom I wouldn’t be doing what I was doing.

Like many of you, I got into film in a serious way in my early teens. I tended – and I had a good home life, so this is
See full article at Den of Geek »

City Slickers: the behind the scenes challenges of a comedy hit

Simon Brew Aug 8, 2017

1991's City Slickers was an Oscar-winning comedy success. It was not without behind the scenes challenges...

Spoilers for City Slickers lie ahead.

Sandwiched between the two big tentpole blockbuster hits of summer 1991 was a genuine sleeper surprise. Whilst it had long been pre-ordained that the Arnold Schwarzenegger-headlined Terminator 2: Judgment Day would rule the summer season with the Kevin Costner-starring Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves, what few saw coming was a film called City Slickers.

It came from the pen of Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel, the comedy-writing team who scripted 1989’s brilliant Parenthood. They co-write the film with Billy Crystal (who didn’t receive credit), who also conceived the idea for the film. And as with most unlikely successes, it had a bit of a history to it.

Crystal came to the idea in the aftermath of his success in When Harry Met Sally,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Leonard Maltin: 'There's a lack of interest in film criticism'

  • ScreenDaily
Leonard Maltin: 'There's a lack of interest in film criticism'
American critic and author thinks the internet has “diluted” film criticism.

Us film critic Leonard Maltin has claimed that there is an increasing lack of interest in film criticism due to the emergence of the internet and social media.

Maltin is one of the most well-known critics in the world for his book Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide, which started in 1969 and was published annually from 1986 until 2014.

Speaking to Screen at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, Maltin said: “There’s no shortage of good and intelligent film critics. There’s a lack of interest and there’s a dilution of criticism in general because of the internet and social media.”

He added: “On one hand one has to applaud the democratisation of communication. There are no gatekeepers, so everyone can… write as they please. But the flip side of the coin is there are no standards being upheld, that’s risky, that’s dangerous
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Barry Norman: A Tribute to The Nation’s Film Critic

Author: Cai Ross

With more TV channels then there are bacteria on a lab technician’s wellington boot, and with social media weaponising opinions en masse, these days everyone is a critic. But as far as British TV audiences in the 70s, 80s and 90s were concerned, there was only really one film critic, Barry Norman Cbe, who has sadly passed away this weekend at the age of 83.

Between 1971 and 1998, Norman’s was the positive verdict every studio wanted on their film poster. With a sprightly, conversational style that sounded like audible handwriting, and a dependable selection of comfortable jumpers to hand, Barry Norman was the nation’s film critic: our Gene Siskel & Roger Ebert rolled into one package.

Coming up through the ranks the old fashioned way, Norman ended up at the BBC via early work as a jobbing journalist and a film critic for various national newspapers. He
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘A great critic and a lovely man’: Barry Norman dies aged 83

Journalist who became familiar figure as BBC’s film reviewer for 26 years wins warm tributes

The worlds of film and journalism are mourning Barry Norman, the veteran critic and journalist who became a weekly oracle for British cinemagoers in the era before the internet took off.

Norman, who presented the BBC’s film review show for 26 years before leaving for Sky, and wrote for newspapers including the Observer and the Guardian, died in his sleep on Friday night. He was 83.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Barry Norman obituary

Journalist and film critic with a beguiling ability to reach a mass television audience

Peter Bradshaw on Barry Norman: ‘His enthusiasm and love for film always shone through’

•A life in pictures

During a long journalistic career Barry Norman, who has died aged 83, perfected a flair for talking beguilingly about cinema to a mass television audience but in a way that did not make aficionados wince. As the presenter and critic of BBC TV’s original Film 72 through to Film 98, he was knowledgeable without affectation, and he did not seem overawed by the industry’s leading lights.

Outside the BBC, his baggy-eyed good looks led to him being called by some “the thinking woman’s crumpet”. Within it, he was “Breezy Bazza”, and once, by John Wayne, he was labelled “a goddam liberal pinko faggot” – after Norman had laughed out loud at Wayne’s suggestion during a press conference
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Barry Norman obituary

Journalist and film critic with a beguiling ability to reach a mass television audience

Peter Bradshaw on Barry Norman: ‘His enthusiasm and love for film always shone through’

•A life in pictures

During a long journalistic career Barry Norman, who has died aged 83, perfected a flair for talking beguilingly about cinema to a mass television audience but in a way that did not make aficionados wince. As the presenter and critic of BBC TV’s original Film 72 through to Film 98, he was knowledgeable without affectation, and he did not seem overawed by the industry’s leading lights.

Outside the BBC, his baggy-eyed good looks led to him being called by some “the thinking woman’s crumpet”. Within it, he was “Breezy Bazza”, and once, by John Wayne, he was labelled “a goddam liberal pinko faggot” – after Norman had laughed out loud at Wayne’s suggestion during a press conference
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Barry Norman – a life in pictures

British film critic and television personality Barry Norman has died aged 83. From his own brand of pickled onions to meeting Darth Vader, we’ve gathered some of the best images through the years

Peter Bradshaw on Barry Norman: ‘His enthusiasm and love for film always shone through’

•A delightful and intelligent critic: Barry Norman obituary

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Barry Norman – a life in pictures

British film critic and television personality Barry Norman has died aged 83. From his own brand of pickled onions to meeting Darth Vader, we’ve gathered some of the best images through the years

Peter Bradshaw on Barry Norman: ‘His enthusiasm and love for film always shone through’

•A delightful and intelligent critic: Barry Norman obituary

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film critic Barry Norman dies aged 83

  • ScreenDaily
Film critic Barry Norman dies aged 83
Norman hosted the BBC’s Film… show for 26 years.

Film critic and TV presenter Barry Norman has died aged 83, according to his family.

He died in his sleep on Friday night (June 30). His daughters Samantha and Emma said in a statement: “He had a great life, a wonderful marriage, and an enviable career.”

“He leaves behind a family who adore him and a great roster of friends who love him too. We will miss him more than we can say.”

Norman presented the BBC’s Film… show from 1972 to 1998. He was the programme’s longest running host.

Son of director Leslie Norman, Barry Norman started out as a journalist, working for The Daily Mail, The Observer and The Guardian.

He became the host of the BBC’s Film… show in 1972, presenting it for 26 years (he briefly left to present Omnibus in 1982 but returned the following year).

Norman quit the programme for good in 1998, defecting to Sky. His
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film critic Barry Norman dies at 83

Journalist who presented BBC Film show for 26 years was known for diplomatic and friendly on-screen approach

Peter Bradshaw on Barry Norman: ‘His love for film always shone through’

• A life in pictures

The film critic Barry Norman has died at the age of 83.

The journalist and former BBC presenter died in his sleep on Friday night.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

British Movie Critic, TV Host Barry Norman Dies

British Movie Critic, TV Host Barry Norman Dies
Barry Norman, the veteran British movie critic and former host of the U.K.’s top TV show about cinema, who had a strong influence on movie-going in the country over several decades, has died at the age of 83. He died in his sleep on Friday, according to his family.

Norman fronted BBC movie-show “Film” from 1972 to 1998 — interviewing the hottest Hollywood actors and filmmakers of the period — and became one of the U.K.’s top celebrities. He had started his career as a print journalist on the Kensington News, and was the Daily Mail’s show-biz editor. He also contributed to several other newspapers, including the Guardian, the Times and the Observer, and wrote a number of books.

He remained a hard-nosed journalist throughout his career, and wasn’t afraid to ask tough questions, leading to dramatic confrontations with A-listers like Robert De Niro, Mel Gibson and John Wayne, with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Barry Norman: 'His enthusiasm and love for film always shone through' | Peter Bradshaw

The face of the BBC’s Film programme for almost three decades was an accessible, unpretentious surveyor of cinema

•A delightful and intelligent critic: Barry Norman obituary

•A life in pictures

As a professional journalist, Barry Norman had paid his dues long before becoming a celebrity and a much-impersonated national icon – complete with a catchphrase that he never actually said: “And why not?”

He had been a reporter at the Daily Mail, show business editor, and then a columnist and leader writer on the Guardian. He then got the gig that made him a legend: presenter on BBC1’s Film programme from 1972 to 1998.

Related: Film critic Barry Norman dies aged 83

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Barry Norman: 'His enthusiasm and love for film always shone through' | Peter Bradshaw

The face of the BBC’s Film programme for almost three decades was an accessible, unpretentious surveyor of cinema

•A delightful and intelligent critic: Barry Norman obituary

•A life in pictures

As a professional journalist, Barry Norman had paid his dues long before becoming a celebrity and a much-impersonated national icon – complete with a catchphrase that he never actually said: “And why not?”

He had been a reporter at the Daily Mail, show business editor, and then a columnist and leader writer on the Guardian. He then got the gig that made him a legend: presenter on BBC1’s Film programme from 1972 to 1998.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Barry Norman dies by Jennie Kermode - 2017-07-01 12:47:20

He was Britain's most successful and popular film critic, hosting the BBC's flagship film review for 26 years. Now Barry Norman has died at the age of 83.

"He had a great life, a wonderful marriage and an enviable career," said his daughters, Samantha and Emma, in a statement. "We will miss him more than we can say."

Norman, who had a passion for cricket and liberal politics, wrote on film for numerous national newspapers and was a Cbe and the proud owner of a Richard Dimbleby Award from BAFTA. Throughout his life he was committed to supporting the British film industry. For the past year he had suffered from lung cancer, and he passed away peacefully in his sleep.

"A film critic and a provider of fine pickled onions. That’s a good life," tweeted Stephen Fry, referring to Norman's sideline as the owner of a brand of pickled onions based on an.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Barry Norman dies, aged 83

Simon Brew Jul 1, 2017

Sad news. The iconic Barry Norman has left us, at the age of 83.

Aw, this is really, really sad news. I’m one of the many who grew up in an era where if you wanted to watch somebody talk and enthuse about films on the television, Barry Norman was your man. His Film programmes were a huge part of my growing up (the one he did just after the loss of his father remains etched in my memory), and it makes it extra sad that we have to report he’s died, at the age of 83.

Norman’s body of work is far broader than he was often given credit for. He was a journalist, a novelist, a film critic and television presenter, amongst many other things, and his last book, 2013’s See You In The Morning, was a moving account of the loss of his beloved Diana.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film milestones my one-year old will never experience

Carley Tauchert Sep 5, 2017

From video shops to the corner fleapit, our kids are going to miss out on some of the movie rites of passage we got to enjoy...

Just over a year and a half ago I had a baby, and my son is a beautiful bundle of joy who is growing rapidly by the day. One of the many things I look forward to as he grows up is introducing him to new and exciting experiences, and the one I actually cannot wait for is the world of film as it was such an important thing to me growing up. But we live in a different age now, and although we have a huge cinematic adventure ahead of us, there are some things I’m quite sad about that he is going to miss out on in this digital age, starting with...

Fleapit cinemas

This actually is the
See full article at Den of Geek »

Do you need to see a film twice for it to work?

Simon Brew Mar 21, 2017

How many of us revisit a film, if it didn't work for us first time around?

A bit of clickbait avoidance. The answer to the question posed in the title is: it clearly depends on the film. But I think there’s a bit more to it than that. Hence this article.

Let’s start, then, with Stephen Fry. In his relatively recent memoir More Fool Me, he spends a welcome chunk of the opening section discussing books, and how memories of books can leak over time. He ties it into Guy Pearce’s character in Memento, thus earning a few extra geek points from the jar.

But there’s a sentence he writes, on page 15, that struck me at the time, and has struck me regularly since. For he simply recalls that “A friend of mine pointed out recently how absurd it was that people reread
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Twelve Days of Classic Christmas Movies – vote for your favourite!

Author: Cai Ross

Christmastime is here. Presumably you already have chestnuts roasting on an open fire, a turkey and some mistletoe, and your first screaming argument about who’s cooking for who and where. ’Tis the season for such timeless traditions, and along with a collective craving for manifestly ill-judged food combinations and a moratorium on our disapproval of comedy knitwear, classic Christmas movies are now a vital part of the great yuletide experience.

But what precisely is a classic Christmas movie? Timeless vintage offerings like Holiday Inn and Miracle on 34th Street are stuffed from titles to credits with all things Christmassy, yet you’ll also find films like Casablanca and The Great Escape on many festive film lists, which have nothing more to do with Christmas than Cannibal Holocaust.

Even the single greatest ‘Christmas Movie’ of all time, It’s a Wonderful Life has a pretty tenuous connection with the Holiday Season,
See full article at HeyUGuys »
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