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'Paddington', 'X+Y' score at Gb Writers’ Guild Awards

  • ScreenDaily
'Paddington', 'X+Y' score at Gb Writers’ Guild Awards
Paul King beat out Nick Hornby and Alex Garland.

Paul King was awarded Best Screenplay for Paddington at the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain Awards in London last night [18 Jan].

King’s script, which was BAFTA-nominated last year, beat out Wild by Nick Hornby and Ex Machina by Alex Garland.

Best First Screenplay went to James Graham for drama X+Y, ahead of ’71 by Gregory Burke and The Falling by Carol Morley.

Writer and producer Russell T Davies received the Outstanding Contribution to Writing Award while Armando Iannucci’s Veep won Best TV Situation Comedy.

A special tribute was also made to Writers’ Guild member David Nobbs.

Wggb president Olivia Hetreed said of the event: “As president of the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain, I am immensely proud of all our Award winners and nominees, a truly impressive display of talent, from the ancient art of playwriting to the youngest one of game writing. All our winners
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Letter: David Nobbs as a mentor

David Nobbs was happy and willing to mentor new writers. He read my first novel and emailed me a full critique. It was mostly positive, but also made valid criticisms and gave me much-appreciated advice on how to improve.

When I sent him my latest book, A Cat Called Dog, he immediately declared that he didn’t like animal books – “apart from Winnie the Pooh” – but did single out one joke as being “brilliant”. To receive such praise from one of the best comic writers of the last half century was a real boost.

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Reggie Perrin – a suburban everyman who captured the essence of his era | Jonathan Freedland

The death of his creator, David Nobbs, reminds us of the genius of the best TV comedy: its characters define their age

Even in death, David Nobbs was attached to his greatest creation. Unwittingly perhaps, social media mourned the writer’s passing by placing his name alongside the initials of Reginald Iolanthe Perrin. The inevitable hashtag of mourning was the same as the monogram on Reggie’s executive briefcase: Rip.

Related: David Nobbs obituary

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David Nobbs: a man who took his humour lying down | Letters

I was once privileged to work with David Nobbs (Obituary, 11 August) on material for a comedy revue at the Three Choirs Festival in Hereford. Two moments from that time stand out clearly. One illustrates that not only was he a great comic writer but also a generous and supportive friend. I showed him a sketch I’d written called Firkin Fair, based on invented but completely nonsensical local folklore. I could have asked for no higher praise when he told me – and I believe he was sincere – he wished he’d written it himself.

The other occasion was when he was suddenly taken ill in a restaurant with what appeared to be a heart attack (it turned out not to be serious). As he was carried out on a stretcher, still fully conscious, he was heard to mutter to some newly arriving customers: “Don’t have the fish!” He never
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Nobbs's Reginald Perrin: 'a stealth drama riding on the wheels of a sitcom'

From mother-in-law gags to existential angst, The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin by the late David Nobbs was brilliantly funny, emotional and absurd

David Nobbs’s Reginald Perrin, in these lazier times of clip shows and false memory, tends to be lumped in with Basil Fawlty and Victor Meldrew as a Great Sitcom Character. Which, of course, he is. And Perrin is a classic sitcom: it has great catchphrases – “Great!”; “Super!”; “I didn’t get where I am today …”; “Morning Joan, 15 minutes late, escaped panther at Bridgend”; “Tricky chap, Johnny Foreigner”; “I’m not a people person,” and so brilliantly on – farcical situations and fantastic, unbeatable humour. But there was a lot more to it than that.

Related: David Nobbs, Reginald Perrin creator, dies at 80

Related: Your next box set: The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Nobbs obituary

Comic writer best known for his Reginald Perrin novels, serialised for television starring Leonard Rossiter

David Nobbs, who has died aged 80, became established in the 1960s as a gag writer for popular performers of the day such as David Frost and Frankie Howerd. This funded his greater ambitions as a novelist, and in 1975 he struck gold with The Death of Reginald Perrin, in which office politics and meeting-filled drudgery at Sunshine Desserts make Reggie Perrin so fear that “his past was his future’s jailer” that he fakes suicide and assumes a fresh identity. A much-loved television adaptation, The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, starring Leonard Rossiter as Perrin and Pauline Yates as his long-suffering wife, Elizabeth, ran between 1976 and 1979, and Nobbs embarked on a series of sometimes interconnected novels and scripts chronicling changes to British life across the decades.

Related: David Nobbs, Reginald Perrin creator, dies at 80

Related: Crossword blog: David Nobbs,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Crossword blog: David Nobbs, crosswording's funniest commentator

In the late David Nobbs’s world, crosswords were hilariously preposterous

David Nobbs, whose death was announced yesterday, noticed things. Things such as crosswords.

Crossword clue I saw in an Australian paper. 'Opposite of salt'. I wrestled with it for three hours. The answer was 'Pepper'.

We ate and slept and slept and ate and lolled on our pits (beds). We read books. We did crosswords. We amused ourselves. We abused ourselves.

A man who compiled crosswords would certainly be capable of a murder of this kind.

The shaking caused his socks to fall down over his ankles, and it was hard to fill in the crossword legibly.

Can’t finish the crossword like you used to? Nasty taste in the mornings? Keep thinking about naked sportswomen?

In the spaces of the crossword he wrote: ‘My name is Reginald Iolanthe Perrin. My mother couldn’t appear in our local Gilbert
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Reginald Perrin creator David Nobbs has passed away, aged 80

Writer David Nobbs has passed away at the age of 80, the British Humanist Association has confirmed.

Nobbs was best known for creating the comic television character Reginald Perrin, played in the BBC series by Leonard Rossiter.

Nobbs created the BBC sitcom The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, which ran between 1976 and 1979, from his series of novels.

The novels follow the story of a middle-aged middle manager, Reginald "Reggie" Perrin, who is driven to bizarre behaviour by the pointlessness of his job.

The Yorkshire-born writer also provided material for The Two Ronnies, Ken Dodd and Frankie Howerd.

Nobbs wrote over 20 novels during a prolific career that spanned nearly 50 years.

Watch a clip from The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin below:
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

David Nobbs, Reginald Perrin creator, dies at 80

Author had written 20 novels, as well as material for comedians including Les Dawson, Ken Dodd, Tommy Cooper, Frankie Howerd and Dick Emery

David Nobbs, the creator of The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, has died at the age of 80, it was announced on Sunday.

Nobbs, who was best known as a comedy writer, was also a longstanding patron of the British Humanist Association, which, along with his agent, confirmed he had died.

Related: Once upon a life: David Nobbs

I didn't get where I am today by not knowing what a genius David Nobbs was. Rip

Very sad to hear of the death of inspirational David Nobbs, who I had quite a few laughs with. A comic genius and an excellent human being.

David Nobbs was a genius of English comedy. That is an astonishing loss. Very sad news indeed.

Very sad today to hear of the death of David Nobbs.
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Pauline Yates obituary

Stage and screen actor who played Reggie Perrin’s long-suffering wife in the television comedy

The gentle good nature of the BBC’s anarchic 1970s comedy The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin that made it such a hit owed much to the innocent yet tacitly conspiratorial support of Reggie Perrin’s wife, Elizabeth, played by Pauline Yates, who has died aged 85. She was a spirit of domestic calm in the mayhem created by David Nobbs’s other characters, led by Leonard Rossiter as the erratic Reggie Perrin, whose bizarre behaviour she treated as normal and in need of no explanation.

The show ran for three series between 1976 and 1979, in the course of which Elizabeth became almost as serenely batty as Reggie. Although she was practically teetotal, Yates needed a large gin and tonic at the end of each recording.

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Malcolm Tierney obituary

Stage and screen actor who excelled in playing authority figures and appeared in TV shows such as Brookside and Lovejoy

Malcolm Tierney, who has died aged 75 of pulmonary fibrosis, was a reliable and versatile supporting actor for 50 years, familiar to television audiences as the cigar-smoking, bullying villain Tommy McArdle in Brookside, nasty Charlie Gimbert in Lovejoy and smoothie Geoffrey Ellsworth-Smythe in David Nobbs's A Bit of a Do, a Yorkshire small-town comedy chronicle starring David Jason and Gwen Taylor.

Always serious and quietly spoken offstage, with glinting blue eyes and a steady, cruel gaze that served him well as authority figures on screen, Tierney was a working-class Mancunian who became a core member of the Workers' Revolutionary party in the 1970s. He never wavered in his socialist beliefs, even when the Wrp imploded ("That's all in my past now," he said), and always opposed restricted entry to the actors' union,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Malcolm Tierney obituary

Stage and screen actor who excelled in playing authority figures and appeared in TV shows such as Brookside and Lovejoy

Malcolm Tierney, who has died aged 75 of pulmonary fibrosis, was a reliable and versatile supporting actor for 50 years, familiar to television audiences as the cigar-smoking, bullying villain Tommy McArdle in Brookside, nasty Charlie Gimbert in Lovejoy and smoothie Geoffrey Ellsworth-Smythe in David Nobbs's A Bit of a Do, a Yorkshire small-town comedy chronicle starring David Jason and Gwen Taylor.

Always serious and quietly spoken offstage, with glinting blue eyes and a steady, cruel gaze that served him well as authority figures on screen, Tierney was a working-class Mancunian who became a core member of the Workers' Revolutionary party in the 1970s. He never wavered in his socialist beliefs, even when the Wrp imploded ("That's all in my past now," he said), and always opposed restricted entry to the actors' union,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Would Tennant Have Made a Better Perrin?

  • Kasterborous
Andrew Reynolds is a writer at Kasterborous Doctor Who News and Reviews - All the latest Doctor Who news and reviews with our weekly podKast, features and interviews, and a long-running forum.

The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin creator David Nobbs didn’t get where he is today by not sharing his casting wishes for Reggie Perrin, the misguided 2009 revamp of...

The post Would Tennant Have Made a Better Perrin? appeared first on Kasterborous Doctor Who News and Reviews.
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Your next box set: The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin

A boorish boss, annoying colleagues, a feeling of pointlessness – 35 years on there's still plenty that rings true about disgruntled salaryman Reggie Perrin's strange adventures

There must be some people who would change nothing about their lives. They have exciting jobs, interesting workmates, supportive employers and fulfilling relationships. Every minute they spend, they spend well.

The other 99% of us, however, have more in common with Reginald Iolanthe Perrin, the 46-year-old sales executive played by Leonard Rossiter. Every day Reggie heads to work on a train that is late, every day he tries to get excited about ice cream, every day he daydreams about his secretary, every day he is lectured by his boss, and every day he returns home for a heart-to-heart with his cat.

Everyone he encounters seems similarly fixed in their roles: his boorish boss Cj ("I didn't get where I am today . . ."); his yes-men colleagues Tony ("Great!
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

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