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10 items from 2013


10 remarkable things about The Swarm

30 September 2013 10:17 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Top 10 Ryan Lambie 2 Oct 2013 - 07:05

Michael Caine described it as one of his worst films. But that doesn't mean that there aren't some remarkable things about The Swarm...

Director and producer Irwin Allen didn't invent the disaster movie, but he certainly helped define it. The Poseidon Adventure (1972) and The Towering Inferno (1974) established a template of Hollywood glamour, melodrama and mass destruction, with some of the most famous actors of the era meeting their maker in spectacular fashion.

Even though Allen didn't direct all of The Poseidon Adventure (he only handled the disaster scenes, while Ronald Neame dealt with the talky bits), Allen's larger-than-life personality, elaborately woven hair and reputation as a producer soon established him as cinema's "master of disaster" - and the results were both critically and financial smashes.

Then along came 1978's The Swarm, and Allen's fortunes took a bit of a nose-dive. Where The Poseidon Adventure »

- ryanlambie

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David C. Anderson, Assistant Director on Blockbusters, Dies

22 August 2013 6:37 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

David C. Anderson, an assistant director, unit production manager, producer and production executive who worked on James Bond films “Dr. No” and “From Russia With Love” and pictures including  “The Deer Hunter,” “Quadrophenia” and “Tequila Sunrise,” died of cancer on August 4 in Richmond, England, after a short illness. He was 72.

During a career spanning almost six decades in the U.K., U.S. and worldwide in film and television, Anderson worked with such directors as Terence Young, Ken Annakin, Ronald Neame, John Huston, Lewis Gilbert, John Sturges, Michael Cimino, Mike Hodges and Blake Edwards. His other credits included “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie,” “The Kremlin Letter,” “The Man Who Would Be King,” “The Eagle Has Landed,” “Flash Gordon” and “What About Bob.”

Anderson’s work in television included “The Saint,” Shirley MacLaine’s series “Shirley’s World” miniseries and films “The Far Pavilions,” “Peter the Great,” “Diana: Her Real Story, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Top '60s Star Has Her Day on TCM

18 August 2013 4:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Natalie Wood movies: From loving Warren Beatty to stripping like Gypsy Rose Lee Three-time Academy Award nominee Natalie Wood, one of the biggest Hollywood stars of the ’60s, is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" performer today, August 18, 2013. TCM is currently showing Elia Kazan’s Splendor in the Grass (1961), a romantic drama written for the screen by playwright William Inge (Picnic, Bus Stop). Wood is fine as a young woman who loses her emotional balance after she’s seduced and abandoned by the son (Warren Beatty) of a wealthy family in Kansas shortly before the Great Depression. For her efforts, she received a Best Actress Oscar nomination. (Sophia Loren was that year’s winner, for the Italian-made Two Women.) (See “TCM movie schedule: Natalie Wood Hot Hollywood Star.” Next in line is Richard Quine’s feeble attempt at screwball comedy, Sex and the Single Girl (1964), a movie that promises much more than it delivers, »

- Andre Soares

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Blu-ray Release: Escape From Zahrain

26 July 2013 5:29 AM, PDT | Disc Dish | See recent Disc Dish news »

Blu-ray Release Date: Sept. 17, 2013

Price: Blu-ray $24.95

Studio: Olive Films

Yul Brynner (l.) and Jack Warden (ctr.) mean business in Escape from Zahrain.

The punchy 1962 action-adventure movie Escape From Zahrain stars Yul Brynner (The Ten Commandments) as a charismatic rebel leader fighting local corruption and foreign exploitation in a fictitious, oil-rich Arab sheikdom.

While this might sound like it’s “ripped from today’s headlines,” the tragic difference is that in 1962, Arab rebels were fighting for modernity, not fundamentalism!

Produced and directed by Ronald Neame (The Poseidon Adventure) and co-starring Sal Mineo (Rebel Without a Cause), Madlyn Rhue (He Rides Tall), Jack Warden (…And Justice for All) and James Mason (Bigger Than Life), Escape From Zahrain is brashly colorful on a very low budget — the flip-side to that same year’s Lawrence of Arabia, if you will. Clothes never get dirty on an arduous, miles-long trek (detergent costs!), and the desert »

- Laurence

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From Swordfights in Paris to Dropping the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima: Parker Evening

17 June 2013 5:03 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eleanor Parker today: Beautiful as ever in Scaramouche, Interrupted Melody Eleanor Parker, who turns 91 in ten days (June 26, 2013), can be seen at her most radiantly beautiful in several films Turner Classic Movies is showing this evening and tomorrow morning as part of their Star of the Month Eleanor Parker "tribute." Among them are the classic Scaramouche, the politically delicate Above and Beyond, and the biopic Interrupted Melody, which earned Parker her third and final Best Actress Academy Award nomination. (Photo: publicity shot of Eleanor Parker in Scaramouche.) The best of the lot is probably George Sidney’s balletic Scaramouche (1952), in which Eleanor Parker plays one of Stewart Granger’s love interests — the other one is Janet Leigh. A loose remake of Rex Ingram’s 1923 blockbuster, the George Sidney version features plenty of humor, romance, and adventure; vibrant colors (cinematography by Charles Rosher); an elaborately staged climactic swordfight; and tough dudes »

- Andre Soares

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The Ealing Studios Rarities Collection Volume 2 – review

11 May 2013 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

1935-42, PG, Network

The first volume of this series was disappointing, but this one is both valuable and entertaining. The first disc from pre-Michael Balcon days has the more significant films. The likable 18th-century children's naval yarn Midshipman Easy (1935) stars future TV star Hughie Green as an idealistic, naive teenager turning up trumps at sea and waving a cutlass ashore while serving on a Royal Navy sloop command by Roger Livesey. It's significant as the directorial debut of Carol Reed and welcomed by his future collaborator Graham Greene in his Spectator film column.

The other film, Brief Ecstasy (1937), directed by Edmond T Gréville, a French film-maker at home on both sides of the Channel, is a little gem about a handsome middle-class Englishman (Hugh Williams) and the attractive student (Linden Travers) with whom he has a one-night stand in London and then meets again five years later, when she's »

- Philip French

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Oscar Winner Who Directed Hepburn, Caron, Finney Has Died

8 May 2013 5:30 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Bryan Forbes dies at 86: Directed Katharine Hepburn, Leslie Caron, the original The Stepford Wives Director Bryan Forbes, whose films include the then-daring The L-Shaped Room, the all-star The Madwoman of Chaillot, and the original The Stepford Wives, has died "after a long illness" at his home in Virginia Water, Surrey, England. Forbes was 86. Born John Theobald Clarke on July 22, 1926, in London, Bryan Forbes began his film career as an actor in supporting roles in British productions of the late 1940s, e.g., Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s The Small Back Room / Hour of Glory and Thornton Freeland’s Dear Mr. Prohack. Another twenty or so movie roles followed in the ’50s, including those in Ronald Neame’s The Million Pound Note / Man with a Million (1954), supporting Gregory Peck, and Carol Reed’s The Key (1958), supporting Sophia Loren and William Holden. Bryan Forbes director Despite his relatively prolific output in the previous decade, »

- Andre Soares

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Rashid Karapiet obituary

1 May 2013 10:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Rashid Karapiet, who has died aged 84, was an actor, singer, playwright, broadcaster and teacher. He was not a star but a jobbing professional, one of the unsung heroes of the theatrical profession, a good companion with, as Tom Stoppard described it, a "vivid" personality. Rashid was also a much-loved and loyal friend.

The second of five children of Edward and Marie-Therese Carrapiett, he was born Reginald Carrapiett in India, and went to school at St Columba's, Delhi, and then St Joseph's and the Agricultural College in Allahabad. He travelled to Britain in the 1950s to train at the Bristol Old Vic theatre school, then took a teacher-training course at the Central School of Speech and Drama, London, and adopted Rashid Karapiet as his professional name. An accomplished linguist, he taught for many years in Germany and the Netherlands.

In 1960, Rashid appeared in Santha Rama Rau's dramatisation of A Passage to India »

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Rashid Karapiet obituary

1 May 2013 10:12 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Rashid Karapiet, who has died aged 84, was an actor, singer, playwright, broadcaster and teacher. He was not a star but a jobbing professional, one of the unsung heroes of the theatrical profession, a good companion with, as Tom Stoppard described it, a "vivid" personality. Rashid was also a much-loved and loyal friend.

The second of five children of Edward and Marie-Therese Carrapiett, he was born Reginald Carrapiett in India, and went to school at St Columba's, Delhi, and then St Joseph's and the Agricultural College in Allahabad. He travelled to Britain in the 1950s to train at the Bristol Old Vic theatre school, then took a teacher-training course at the Central School of Speech and Drama, London, and adopted Rashid Karapiet as his professional name. An accomplished linguist, he taught for many years in Germany and the Netherlands.

In 1960, Rashid appeared in Santha Rama Rau's dramatisation of A Passage to India »

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DVD Review: 'Gambit'

5 March 2013 7:49 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★☆☆☆☆ In an interview alongside American co-star Cameron Diaz, British Oscar-winner Colin Firth expressed that he, "felt it would be nice to do a comedy". This flavourless sentiment echoes throughout the dreary, vacuous and painfully goofy scenes of the farcical Gambit (2012). A bizarre joint venture between the acclaimed Coen brothers, who penned the screenplay, and Michael Hoffman in the director's chair, Gambit is supposed to be a light-hearted refresh of Ronald Neame's 1966 caper film, but is instead wrong-footed by daftness. Firth plays art curator Harry Deane, a pastiche of the original character played by Michael Caine back in the 60s.

Read more » »

- CineVue UK

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10 items from 2013


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