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Propagate & Nash Entertainment Seal Partnership Ahead Of Mipcom

Ben Silverman and Howard T Owens’ indie studio Propagate Content has inked a worldwide production and distribution deal with Bruce Nash’s Nash Entertainment. The plan is for Propogate to mine Nash’s TV library of series including reality fare like For Love or Money and Who Wants to Marry My Dad? to be redeveloped and reshaped for U.S. and international markets. They also will team on new scripted and unscripted content with Propagate producing and handling distribution of…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Movie About Coney Island’s Real-Life Baby Saver Incubates At Nash Entertainment

Exclusive: Bruce Nash's Nash Entertainment and Robert Kosberg have teamed with Hacksaw Ridge exec producer James M. Vernon's Mfm and Simon David Hunters' Myth Film Company to produce Dreamland, a film based on the true story of neonatal care pioneer Dr. Martin Couney. In the early 20th century, Couney opened the Baby Incubators exhibit at Coney Island’s Dreamland amusement park in New York, saving thousands of preemies who were not allowed in most hospitals at that…
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What’s a Best Picture Nomination Really Worth? A Look at Return on Investment

What’s a Best Picture Nomination Really Worth? A Look at Return on Investment
Movie studios are notorious for taking a creative approach to accounting, and that makes it difficult to calculate just how much money is being made. But it’s possible to get a sense of how valuable awards attention can be by comparing the box office results of this year’s nine Oscar nominees for best picture to their reported production budgets.

Calculating return on investment is an imperfect science, as studios won’t say how much they spend on marketing and distribution. Nor does our model factor in TV deals and other licensing pacts. To calculate a rough Roi, Variety measured only production cost and worldwide gross. It’s worth noting that studios don’t receive all the profits; theater owners get roughly half, and most small distributors sell off international rights.

That said, “La La Land,” which leads the Oscar race with 14 noms, is also the big winner when it comes to profit margin.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Asia Box Office: Reliable Sources Sometimes Hard to Come by

The international box office landscape has continued to expand beyond almost all imagination over the past decade with the often-astonishing figures being quoted capturing headlines across the globe.

But the immediate problem being faced by those who keep track of returns is how to first find reliable sources in emerging or developing markets for the data they need and even then, in some cases, how to decide what can actually be believed.

For almost 20 years now Bruce Nash and his team at The Numbers have expanded as the industry has – from the days in the late 1990s when they were following the fortunes of around 300 films to the around 20,000 they are keeping tabs on these days.

“As the industry has developed, it really has become a tale of North American tracking and of the world – and the two being quite different,” says Nash.

“In North America you have the buffer of the studios,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Summer Box Office Wrap Up: 7 big lessons from a season full of disappointments

  • Hitfix
Summer Box Office Wrap Up: 7 big lessons from a season full of disappointments
There's been a bit of confusion in the media as of late about the performance of this year's crop of summer movies. Pieces abound about the so-called dismal state of the season, and yet when you look at it purely from a numbers perspective, 2016 actually ranks as the second-best summer ever in terms of domestic box office (2013 remains firmly in first place). So why all the doomsaying? First, let's take a look at a list of this summer's out-and-out "flops" -- a designation that can roughly be judged by measuring a film's budget-to-gross ratio. Historically, for a title to be deemed "profitable" it has to have made at least two times its production budget, and by that measure, the last four months have produced a total of six outright box office failures. They are: Star Trek Beyond Budget: $185 million Worldwide gross: $285 million Ghostbusters Budget: $144 million Worldwide gross: $219 million Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
See full article at Hitfix »

Box Office Meltdown: Hollywood Races to Win Back Summer Crowds

Box Office Meltdown: Hollywood Races to Win Back Summer Crowds
From “Jaws” to “Jurassic Park,” few directors can rival Steven Spielberg in the blockbuster arena. But even Spielberg’s magic touch couldn’t save “The BFG” at the box office.

On paper, the film, a $140 million adaptation of a beloved children’s book with a script by “ET” writer Melissa Mathison, had all the makings of a hit. Instead, the movie collapsed at the multiplexes, eking out less than $20 million in its opening weekend.

It’s a stunning fall for one of cinema’s highest-flying talents — a director whose finger was affixed to the pulse of mainstream tastes for decades. Yet “The Bfg” is only the latest high-profile casualty in a summer that’s seen a slew of big-budget domestic bombs. Indeed, red ink has spilled out from such misses as “Alice Through the Looking Glass,” “Warcraft,” “The Legend of Tarzan,” and “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

If 'Ghostbusters' is a flop, it won't be because of misogyny - it'll be because it's bad

  • Hitfix
If 'Ghostbusters' is a flop, it won't be because of misogyny - it'll be because it's bad
Needless to say, Ghostbusters is one of the biggest question marks of the 2016 summer movie season. While reviews have been mainly positive (it currently boasts a 75% "Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes) and the film is Fandango's "top pre-selling live-action comedy of the year to date," box office experts are generally wary of making opening-weekend predictions for a film that has been the subject of negative buzz and become a cultural lightning rod since it was first announced in 2014. "These films are usually 100% dependent on word-of-mouth, and [with] Ghostbusters, you really can't tell what word-of-mouth is legitimate, and what is coming from internet trolls trying to start a fire," said Box Office Media analyst Daniel Loria, referencing the misogyny-driven outrage around the reboot's all-woman main cast. "I have to be very careful of my instincts [on] Ghostbusters, because I think it's really hard to know," echoed The Numbers founder Bruce Nash, who
See full article at Hitfix »

MoviePass to Experiment With New Pricing Models, CEO Says

When MoviePass launched in 2011, it promised to revolutionize the theater-going experience much as Netflix had upended the home entertainment business. But five years later, the company, which offers unlimited monthly access to theaters, remains little known, its ambitions stymied by exhibitors who see it as a threat, not an ally.

Raising Moviepass’ national profile and changing theater chains’ minds about the service is now the task of Mitch Lowe. The co-founder of Netflix will take the reins at the movie theater subscription service this month. He hopes to grow MoviePass’ user base by offering different price plans and streamlining its service. It will also fall to the newly minted CEO to try to convince the exhibition industry that MoviePass can help bolster ticket sales and concession revenues at a time when consumers are losing interest in cinemas.

“People are going to the movies less often because there are these other great entertainment options available,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Can ‘Finding Dory’ beat ‘Captain America: Civil War’ at the summer box office?

  • Hitfix
Can ‘Finding Dory’ beat ‘Captain America: Civil War’ at the summer box office?
Day after day since opening a week ago, Finding Dory has been absolutely dominating the box office and setting record after record. Here are some of the records the Pixar sequel has blown out of the water: • Highest opening weekend for an animated film at the domestic box office, beating Shrek the Third’s $135.1 million • Second-biggest June opening weekend ever in the U.S., behind only last year’s Jurassic World • Largest preview night for an animated film (Thursday), surpassing Minions’ $9.2 million • Fastest animated movie to cross $200 million at the domestic box office, in seven days, beating Minions’ and Toy Story 3’s nine days So is it a sure thing that Dory will be the biggest movie of the summer? Can it surpass Captain America: Civil War? And does Dory have a shot at becoming the top-grossing film of the entire year? For HitFix’s dive into those questions with Roth Cornet,
See full article at Hitfix »

Roland Emmerich is very confident people care about 'Independence Day: Resurgence'

  • Hitfix
Roland Emmerich is very confident people care about 'Independence Day: Resurgence'
According to the box office experts I spoke with, Independence Day: Resurgence is far from a commercial slam dunk, despite being the sequel to one of the biggest blockbusters of the 1990s. “In the social media tracking we’re doing, we’re really not seeing the sort of activity we were seeing for example with Jurassic World,” said Box Office Media analyst Daniel Loria. “Honestly, I think it's been too long since the first film,” chimed in The Numbers founder Bruce Nash. “The key under-25 audience won't remember the original film coming out.” Don’t tell that to Roland Emmerich! The superhero-bashing director is already plotting a third ID4, which will be “an intergalactic journey,” as he told Empire magazine. "It'll be [set] maybe a year or two later, not 20 years [on]. I want to maintain this group of people, especially the young characters, and Jeff [Goldblum] and Brent [Spiner] will take part in it.
See full article at Hitfix »

Will 'Independence Day: Resurgence' be this year's 'Jurassic World' - or this year's 'Tron: Legacy'?

  • Hitfix
Will 'Independence Day: Resurgence' be this year's 'Jurassic World' - or this year's 'Tron: Legacy'?
When Independence Day arrived in theaters in the summer of 1996, the monument-destroying blockbuster was a genuine box office phenomenon, grossing over $300 million domestically and $800 million worldwide by the end of its run. Unfortunately for the coffers of distributor 20th Century Fox, a sequel to the film never materialized -- at least until now, with the extremely-belated followup Independence Day: Resurgence slated to hit theaters next Thursday (sans the original film's breakout star Will Smith). The question now is, can the sequel to one of the '90s biggest hits make an impact in the overcrowded marketplace of 2016 the way Jurassic World managed last summer? Or will its performance be closer to that of Tron: Legacy, which failed to match the heights some had predicted when it hit theaters in 2010? After surveying three box office experts for their thoughts on Resurgence’s box office potential, the answer appears perhaps grimmer than
See full article at Hitfix »

‘Zootopia’ is king of the box office jungle. Can any 2016 animated movie take its crown?

  • Hitfix
‘Zootopia’ is king of the box office jungle. Can any 2016 animated movie take its crown?
Their own mammal metropolis isn’t the only place Nick Wilde and Judy Hopps have won over; the bunny-and-fox duo have also dominated the world, with Disney’s Zootopia reaching the $1 billion mark at the worldwide box office earlier this week. It’s the top-earning animated feature of 2016 thus far, well on its way to making twice as much as Kung Fu Panda 3, which is at #2 among animated films this year. Will Zootopia be king of the 2016 jungle? Or can another animated flick top it? Box office experts agree: Finding Dory is likely to surpass Zootopia’s $1 billion+ to become the top-earning animated movie of 2016. A small, unscientific poll of mine also shows that for parents, Finding Dory is the most-anticipated animated film yet to be released this year. It is the most-often mentioned movie from the handful of parent bloggers I emailed asking what animated film they and their kids are most looking forward to. “My family and I are eager to see Finding Dory this month because Finding Nemo is one of our favorites, including just about every Disney Pixar movie too,” Amy Bellgardt, creator of MomSpark.net and mother of two boys told me via email. Outside of superhero fare, 2016 has thus far been a rough year for franchises, with audiences turning rather anti-sequel, or perhaps having no tolerance for sequels that just aren’t much good. Zoolander 2, Alice Through the Looking Glass, The Huntsman: Winter’s War, and Divergent Series: Allegiant have all flopped. Kung Fu Panda 3 wasn’t a total failure, but it has somewhat underperformed, earning less than each of the two other films in the franchise. But as David Mumpower of Box Office Prophets told us via email, “2016’s anti-sequel consumer behavior shouldn’t impact Finding Dory.” For seven years, Finding Nemo reigned as Pixar’s highest grossing film, until Toy Story 3 came along. Last year’s Inside Out is the only other film from the studio to surpass Nemo’s box office tally. It still stands as the seventh highest-grossing animated movie of all time at the worldwide box office. Finding Nemo remains one of Pixar’s most beloved films, frequently topping or nearly topping both fan and critic rankings of the studio’s movies, so Finding Dory will bring the solid established audience not only of Pixar devotees but also fans of Nemo especially. With Finding Dory coming out 13 years after Nemo, it’s not quite at the point where there’s a sizable number of people who saw it as kids who now have kids of their own to take to the movies — as was the case with The Lion King’s massively successful 2011 re-release — but “it’s pretty close,” Bruce Nash, founder and publisher of The Numbers, pointed out. Finding Dory topping Zootopia’s gross would make the Pixar sequel the fifth animated movie to cross the $1 billion mark after Toy Story 3, Frozen, Minions, and Zootopia. The creators of those animation box office champions all have new films coming out this year: Disney’s got Zootopia and Moana. Disney•Pixar has Finding Dory opening a week from now. And Illumination Entertainment, the makers of Minions and the Despicable Me movies, will release The Secret Life of Pets next month. Secret Life is a kind of Toy Story for dogs and cats and bunnies, showing us what goofy antics our pets are up to when we’re not looking. Zootopia proved that another non-sequel, original concept could join Frozen in the $1 billion club, albeit with the proven brand recognition of Disney. “Secret Life of Pets can also be a success mid-summer, although $1 billion is too much to expect from it,” Gitesh Pandya of Box Office Guru said via email. Just how much will Secret Life’s family relations to Minions boost its box office success? It’ll help, though the box office experts I consulted have divergent thoughts about just how much it’ll help. Secret Life’s invocation of the film’s connection to Illumination’s uber-popular little yellow guys with the words “from the humans behind Despicable Me” is, according to Mumpower, “one of the strongest marketing slogans imaginable right now. Putting that note in the trailer spikes the box office dramatically.” Meanwhile, Pandya said, “Tapping into the Minions fan base is a smart starting point,” and Nash said efforts to make mainstream audiences aware of the Minions connection “won’t make a huge deal of difference.” Nash also noted that DreamWorks Animation wasn’t able to translate the popularity of its Shrek films into success for the movies that followed the first couple of Shrek installments. How to Train Your Dragon and the Madagascar franchise is where DreamWorks later found box office success, though the four Shrek movies still top the animation studio’s list of highest grossing films. Though Mumpower has confidence in the power of Secret Life’s link to Minions, he added, “I suspect that Secret Life of Pets would have succeeded if it had come first [among Illumination’s films]. The attachment humans have for their pets fosters continued interest in such concepts, and this movie in particular has a terrific ad campaign. The prim [poodle] rocking out to heavy metal is a perfect animated comedy gag.” Universal Studios, which is distributing the film, is tapping into that dog-lover and cat-lover audience with a huge partnership with PetSmart. Looking back at Zootopia, what accounted for its success? It was a film praised by both critics and audiences, and it had a long stretch of time without any competition from other family movies.* Moana has the strong potential to find success for similar reasons, along with the Disney brand recognition. It hits theaters on Thanksgiving weekend, following Trolls’ early November opening and ahead of the Christmas week premiere of Sing, Illumination Entertainment’s movie about animals in an American Idol-esque competition. So Moana doesn’t have quite as much space to itself as Zootopia did, but it’s safe to bet it’ll be the reigning animated movie of the holiday season. Moana, ostensibly introducing the House of Mouse’s first Polynesian princess, features music by Lin-Manuel Miranda. Nash does not expect Miranda’s involvement to be a box office boost in and of itself, despite the massive popularity of Miranda’s Hamilton. Disney musicals are already recognized for their quality tunes, so the film already has its draw for the music (which we may be hearing for the first time in the trailer set to hit the web this Sunday). *The Little Prince, based on the beloved 1943 French book by Antoine Saint-Exupéry, was originally scheduled for a U.S. release two weeks after Zootopia’s opening, but Paramount pulled the film from its slate a mere week before the scheduled release. It’s likely Little Prince wouldn’t have been much competition for Zootopia anyway, since it had nowhere near the marketing reach of Disney’s movie. (Which is perhaps one reason why Paramount inexplicably canceled the release — the studio didn’t seem to know how to market Little Prince, though it has released some very sweet and charming trailers for the film.) At the overseas box office, meanwhile, Le Petit Prince has become the most successful French animated film ever. Netflix has taken on its U.S. distribution, with a release on its streaming platform and in some theaters scheduled for August 5. Here is what we can expect from some other 2016 animated movies: Ice Age: Collision Course (out July 22): Pandya pointed out that the Ice Age brand has been a “monster performer overseas, so I would not rule out Ice Age: Collision Course.” Kubo and the Two Strings (out August 19): This original fantasy action-adventure tale set in ancient Japan is the fourth feature from stop-motion studio Laika Entertainment, which made the film adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Coraline. Nash predicts that Kubo will earn an Oscar nomination for Best Animated Feature, and he said Laika is “overdue for a breakout” (a film hitting $200 million worldwide), but he “wouldn’t bet on” Kubo being that film. Trolls (out November 4): Justin Timberlake’s song “Can’t Stop the Feeling!” is seeking to build up anticipation for animated musical Trolls, based on the wild hair-sporting Troll dolls. The song is already unavoidable and just became Jt’s first #1 single in nearly 10 years. The Angry Birds Movie (opened in the U.S. May 20): As of this writing, Angry Birds has earned just under $290 million worldwide. Nash expects the movie based on the popular mobile phone game to finish up with a $350 million total. Mumpower pointed out that Angry Birds had a sizable drop-off this past weekend internationally. “That’s a troubling sign,” he said. “I’d give it the benefit of the doubt and say it finishes with $375 million worldwide.” Pandya, however, can see the film earning $450 million with help from its Japan opening in October. Now, four animated films (and probably five before 2016’s over) have earned more than $1 billion. Could an animated feature cross the next landmark spot, $1.5 billion, any time soon before inflation’s carrying movies to that milestone? From these three box office experts, the answer to that is a big “no.” Thus far, seven films have crossed that $1.5 million mark, and they’re all PG-13-rated live action films. Five are sequels, and the other two are Avatar and Titanic. A family-friendly animated feature is unlikely to earn that much in the near future since films with those kind of grosses are reliant on repeat viewings. Kids who see a movie a second time at a birthday party is one instance where that happens with animated movies, and Frozen’s a singular success that had lots of parents taking their Elsa-obsessed kids to see it on more than one occasion. But typically, teens and young adults are more likely to pay to see a movie more than once. Even Frozen 2 is unlikely to reach that $1.5 million milestone. Frozen fatigue may be the culprit there. As Mumpower noted, the sequel “may suffer from unreasonable expectations when the time arrives — some folks are tired of it.” That’s not to say Frozen 2, whenever it does come out, will be a box office failure on any level, though. Even if it gets a chillier reception than the 2013 original, the cold won’t bother Disney anyway. Here are the animated features scheduled for a wide release in the U.S. later this year: Finding Dory - June 17 The Secret Life of Pets - July 8 Ice Age: Collision Course - July 22 Sausage Party (Seth Rogan’s R-rated animated movie) - August 12 Kubo and the Two Strings - August 19 Storks - September 23 Trolls - November 4 Moana - November 23 Sing - December 21
See full article at Hitfix »

What happened with 'X-Men: Apocalypse' at the box office?

  • Hitfix
What happened with 'X-Men: Apocalypse' at the box office?
While the $80 million four-day gross for X-Men: Apocalypse fell essentially in line with the studio's expectations heading into Memorial Day weekend, it's still being looked at as something of a disappointment by analysts, who cite the $110 million four-day opening for the last film in the franchise-- 2014's Days of Future Past -- in making their case. As Box Office Guru founder Gitesh Pandya put it, "Looking at tickets sold, its opening weekend ranks 7th out of the 9 X-Men universe films." Which raises the question: why did the biggest, most character-rich X-Men movie yet fall so short of its predecessor? We reached out to box office analysts to weigh in, and they offered up three big reasons why Apocalypse fell short. 1. It garnered far worse reviews than the two previous films in the franchise. Finishing with a lackluster 48% average on Rotten Tomatoes, Apocalypse came up far short of the two previous
See full article at Hitfix »

Anatomy of a Flop: 'Alice Through the Looking Glass'' disastrous performance, explained

  • Hitfix
With a gross of around $35 million over the four-day Memorial Day weekend, Disney's Alice Through the Looking Glass fell far short of analysts' expectations and is well on its way to becoming one of the year's biggest flops. So how did the James Bobin-directed sequel fall so short of its predecessor's massive $116 million opening weekend? HitFix reached out to box office experts to contextualize the film's disappointing performance. "Alice was a disaster any way you look at it," bottom-lined Box Office Guru founder Gitesh Pandya. "It was not a sequel that audiences were asking for in the first place and the final product was dull which led to bad reviews. Hence, there was no must-see factor." In terms of competition, Looking Glass went up against the mega-sequel X-Men: Apocalypse (which also underperformed relative to expectations despite handily finishing at No. 1) this weekend, which would understandably lead many to assume
See full article at Hitfix »

Why 'Batman v Superman' suffered such a massive box office drop in its second weekend

  • Hitfix
Why 'Batman v Superman' suffered such a massive box office drop in its second weekend
Note: You can watch Roth Cornet and I discuss this topic in the video embedded above and below. After grossing a record-breaking $166 million in its opening frame, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice declined precipitously in its second weekend, dropping a huge 68.4% to $52 million -- a plummet that has left many industry observers to wonder whether the film will even manage to crack the $1 billion mark globally. Indeed, Box Office Guru founder Gitesh Pandya is among those predicting a sub-billion-dollar total. "I project a domestic final of about $345M and a worldwide final of around $900M," Pandya told me via email.  So what contributed to Dawn of Justice's massive decline, which puts it on a par with the widely-reviled X-Men spinoff X-Men Origins: Wolverine? Some have speculated that the film benefitted from an Easter-holiday boost in its first frame, thereby inflating the gap between its first and second weekends
See full article at Hitfix »

How will those bad reviews affect 'Batman v Superman's' opening weekend? Box office experts weigh in

  • Hitfix
How will those bad reviews affect 'Batman v Superman's' opening weekend? Box office experts weigh in
The Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice reviews are in, and...well, they could have been better. (Read Drew McWeeny's take on the film here.) So how will the film's mixed-to-poor critical notices affect its opening weekend box-office? HitFix surveyed three box office experts for their take, and what emerged is a diminished but far from disastrous picture of BvS's commercial prospects. First, the bad news: general moviegoers really do pay attention to review aggregators like Rotten Tomatoes (where Batman v Superman stands at 32% "Rotten") and Metacritic (44/100), and those will likely convince at least a small portion of that potential audience to skip the film altogether. "At most, I'd think that one out of every ten film fans is on the fence about Dawn of Justice enough that reviews will sway their decision to see the movie this weekend," says Box Office Prophets founder David Mumpower. "That means the film
See full article at Hitfix »

Why was 'Blade Runner 2' dumped into the middle of January? Box-office experts weigh in

  • Hitfix
Why was 'Blade Runner 2' dumped into the middle of January? Box-office experts weigh in
On Thursday it was announced that Warner Bros. will release director Denis Villeneuve's highly-anticipated Blade Runner 2 on January 12, 2018 -- a surprise to many given that January is historically (and perhaps unfairly) viewed as a dumping ground for less-than-quality films. But is it actually a smart decision to debut the Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling-starring sci-fi sequel so early in the year? We asked four leading box-office experts to weigh in, and -- not surprisingly -- Deadpool's startling box-office success in the middle of February was top of mind for all of them. "I think Deadpool has been obviously part of the proof of that -- that if you have the right movie and the right marketing campaign, people don't really care [about] the specific date that you release it," said Bruce Nash, founder of TheNumbers.com. "Obviously if a movie like Blade Runner came out the same weekend as a Star Wars movie,
See full article at Hitfix »

Can 'The Force Awakens' beat 'Avatar's' global box office record? Not a chance, experts say

  • Hitfix
Can 'The Force Awakens' beat 'Avatar's' global box office record? Not a chance, experts say
Star Wars: The Force Awakens toppled Avatar's domestic box-office record after only three weeks in theaters, but it's still a long way off from surpassing the James Cameron sci-fi film's global record of $2.7 billion. So what are Episode VII's chances of becoming the worldwide box-office champ? HitFix asked four box-office experts for their predictions, and the consensus is pretty clear: there's not a snowball's chance in hell. "I think the chances are slim, slim to none I would say at this point," said Bruce Nash, founder of the TheNumbers.com. "You know, it's still got a long way to go. I think it will overtake Titanic probably, but I think that based on the numbers we've got so far, it is going to fall short of Avatar's global gross." Jeremy Kay, U.S. editor of Screen International, concurs with Nash, noting that The Force Awakens has too much
See full article at Hitfix »

Sean Ken Takase Dies: Exec Assistant At Nash Entertainment Was 30

Sean Ken Takase, who served as executive assistant to Bruce Nash at reality TV production outfit Nash Entertainment and also pursued avenues in music and acting, died unexpectedly on November 28, it was announced today. He was 30. Born in San Jose, Takase had been working in the entertainment industry for four years. In addition to his day job at Nash Entertainment, he DJ’d nights under the name Sean Tee from the Bay Area to La. He was noted by friends and colleagues for…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Comedies, Superhero Movies to Battle at Fierce Summer Box Office

Comedies, Superhero Movies to Battle at Fierce Summer Box Office
Debuting a comedy in the summer is no laughing matter.

Competition to attract moviegoers looking to have their funny bone tickled has never been fiercer, producers and analysts say. Between May and September, 13 wide-release laughers are slated to open, among them such hotly anticipated titles as “Ted 2”; “Spy,” with Melissa McCarthy as an unlikely secret agent; and “Trainwreck,” with Amy Schumer as a monogamy-avoiding woman. Just last week, Relativity Studios yanked gymnastics satire “The Bronze” from July and repositioned it in October, fearing it would be cannibalized in the seasonal glut.

“It’s an era of compelling comedies,” said Paul Brooks, the producer of the summer smash “Pitch Perfect 2.” “The bar has been raised so high in recent years that the films that pass it have a better chance of reaching a wider audience, so there are more getting released in summer.”

Going back to the time of “Animal House” and “Ghostbusters,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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