George Nader (I) - News Poster

News

Beautiful Cult Horror Cinema Actress (and Bond Girl Contender) Has Died

Yvonne Monlaur: Cult horror movie actress & Bond Girl contender was featured in the 1960 British classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula.' Actress Yvonne Monlaur dead at 77: Best remembered for cult horror classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula' Actress Yvonne Monlaur, best known for her roles in the 1960 British cult horror classics Circus of Horrors and The Brides of Dracula, died of cardiac arrest on April 18 in the Paris suburb of Neuilly-sur-Seine. Monlaur was 77. According to various online sources, she was born Yvonne Thérèse Marie Camille Bédat de Monlaur in the southwestern town of Pau, in France's Pyrénées-Atlantiques department, on Dec. 15, 1939. Her father was poet and librettist Pierre Bédat de Monlaur; her mother was a Russian ballet dancer. The young Yvonne was trained in ballet and while still a teenager became a model for Elle magazine. She was “discovered” by newspaper publisher-turned-director André Hunebelle,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Outre Eye of Daniel Xiii Featuring Death Becomes Her, The Million Eyes of Sumuru, City of the Dead, and more!

The Outre Eye of Daniel Xiii Featuring Death Becomes Her, The Million Eyes of Sumuru, City of the Dead, and more!
Sharks, female convicts, Christopher Lee… what more could a fright fan ask for?

Death Becomes Her

• Release Date: Available April 26th on Blu-ray

• Written By: Martin Donovan, David Koepp

• Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

• Starring: Meryl Streep, Bruce Willis, Goldie Hawn

Here we go, creeps — a real milestone moment here in the ol’ Crypt o’ Xiii… we are going to get someone else to talk a bit about the feature at hand (I know, I can scarcely believe I’m going to shut up for a second or two either); in this case, the 1992 laughs and lacerations pic Death Becomes Her! So let’s put our claws, flippers… whatever the hell you may have together for my wife Hatelyn Xiii!

Daniel Xiii. So why don’t ya give my loyal coffin club the rundown on ol’ Dbh?

Hatelyn Xiii. Ok, this flick features a long standing rivalry between two women (one
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Former Child Actor Moore Dead at 89: Kissed Temple, Was Married to MGM Musical Star Powell

Child actor Dickie Moore: 'Our Gang' member. Former child actor Dickie Moore dead at 89: Film career ranged from 'Our Gang' shorts to features opposite Marlene Dietrich and Gary Cooper 1930s child actor Dickie Moore, whose 100+ movie career ranged from Our Gang shorts to playing opposite the likes of Marlene Dietrich, Barbara Stanwyck, and Gary Cooper, died in Connecticut on Sept. 7, '15 – five days before his 90th birthday. So far, news reports haven't specified the cause of death. According to a 2013 Boston Phoenix article about Moore's wife, MGM musical star Jane Powell, he had been “suffering from arthritis and bouts of dementia.” Dickie Moore movies At the behest of a persistent family friend, combined with the fact that his father was out of a job, Dickie Moore (born on Sept. 12, 1925, in Los Angeles) made his film debut as an infant in Alan Crosland's 1927 costume drama The Beloved Rogue,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Two Movies Starring (Inventor) Lamarr Coming Up on TCM

Hedy Lamarr: 'Invention' and inventor on Turner Classic Movies (photo: Hedy Lamarr publicity shot ca. early '40s) Two Hedy Lamarr movies released during her heyday in the early '40s — Victor Fleming's Tortilla Flat (1942), co-starring Spencer Tracy and John Garfield, and King Vidor's H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), co-starring Robert Young and Ruth Hussey — will be broadcast on Turner Classic Movies on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Pt, respectively. Best known as a glamorous Hollywood star (Ziegfeld Girl, White Cargo, Samson and Delilah), the Viennese-born Lamarr (née Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler), who would have turned 100 on November 9, was also an inventor: she co-developed and patented with composer George Antheil the concept of frequency hopping, currently known as spread-spectrum communications (or "spread-spectrum broadcasting"), which ultimately led to the evolution of wireless technology. (More on the George Antheil and Hedy Lamarr invention further below.) Somewhat ironically,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Beautiful, Lighthearted Fox Star Suffered Many Real-Life Tragedies

Jeanne Crain: Lighthearted movies vs. real life tragedies (photo: Madeleine Carroll and Jeanne Crain in ‘The Fan’) (See also: "Jeanne Crain: From ‘Pinky’ Inanity to ‘MargieMagic.") Unlike her characters in Margie, Home in Indiana, State Fair, Centennial Summer, The Fan, and Cheaper by the Dozen (and its sequel, Belles on Their Toes), or even in the more complex A Letter to Three Wives and People Will Talk, Jeanne Crain didn’t find a romantic Happy Ending in real life. In the mid-’50s, Crain accused her husband, former minor actor Paul Brooks aka Paul Brinkman, of infidelity, of living off her earnings, and of brutally beating her. The couple reportedly were never divorced because of their Catholic faith. (And at least in the ’60s, unlike the humanistic, progressive-thinking Margie, Crain was a “conservative” Republican who supported Richard Nixon.) In the early ’90s, she lost two of her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wet She's a Star, Dry She Ain't: Williams' Post-mgm Years

Esther Williams: ‘Pools and Smiles’ formula grows stale [See previous post: "Esther Williams: Swimwear MGM Musical Star Dies."] By the early ’50s, Louis B. Mayer had been ousted from the studio he had helped to found, having been replaced by Dore Schary. Whether or not a coincidence, with the exception of Million Dollar Mermaid, the Esther Williams movies of the ’50s — e.g., The Duchess of Idaho, Skirts Ahoy! (stolen by Vivian Blaine in a supporting role), Dangerous When Wet, Easy to Love — lacked the luster of those released in the previous decade, despite more prestigious directors (George Sidney, Charles Walters, Robert Z. Leonard) and the usual co-stars (Van Johnson, Red Skelton, Howard Keel). (Photo: Esther Williams in Million Dollar Mermaid.) Not surprisingly, although MGM’s color musicals would remain in vogue a few more years, Esther Williams and the studio parted ways following George Sidney’s tired-looking Jupiter’s Darling (1956), with Williams and Howard Keel (as Hannibal) fooling around in ancient times.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

DVD Review: House of a Thousand Dolls

House Of A Thousand Dolls

Stars: Vincent Price, Sancho Gracia, Herbert Fux, George Nader, Martha Hyer | Written by María del Carmen Martínez Román, Harry Alan Towers | Directed by Jeremy Summers

With a title like House of a Thousand Dolls, Vincent Price starring and an opening scene featuring a horse drawn hearse you would be forgiven for thinking that the film is horror based. You soon find out that this is not the case but it may at least be paying a cheeky homage to its iconic star. The fact is though that House of a Thousand Dolls is a very different beast.

While vacationing in the Tangiers a couple meet an old friend searching for his missing girlfriend who is believed to have been kidnapped by a group of slave traders. When the friend is killed the couple are dragged into investigating both the death and kidnapping which appears to
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Review: Nowhere to Go DVD

Nowhere to Go (1958) starts well, with an almost nine-minute prison break sequence that's highly unusual because it shows someone breaking into a prison. In this case it's Bernard Lee (M in James Bond) who's the one scaling the wall. Bold? Perhaps...but it certainly sets the tone for what is surely an eventful film...

George Nader plays suave conman Paul Gregory, who latches onto wealthy widow Harriet Johnson because she has a rare coin collection. Posing as a playwright stuck on 'the second act' he arranges the sale of her coins, insisting that he be paid on her behalf in cash for the £50,000. At this point, I could delve further into the plot but...well...I think you can guess the rest.

Jazz fans will enjoy the jazz score by British star Dizzy Reece. Non-jazz fans like me might find it grating at times. Do not watch this movie if you've got a headache.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Nowhere to Go

(Seth Holt, 1958, StudioCanal, PG)

In 1956 Sir Michael Balcon appointed the Observer's energetic 29-year-old theatre critic, Kenneth Tynan, as Ealing Studios' script editor at a handsome £2,000 a year. His job was to bring in new writers, actors and ideas. Little came of this. Tynan suggested some interesting projects, all passed on to other studios. He wrote a brilliant six-page letter to Balcon about what was wrong with the unadventurous way he ran Ealing that was probably never posted, and he co-scripted the tough, low-budget thriller Nowhere to Go, the studio's penultimate production.

Tynan's collaborator on Nowhere to Go was Seth Holt, veteran Ealing editor and producer who was determined his directorial debut should be "the least Ealing film ever made". A realistic noir thriller in an American tradition that was then coming to an end, it has none of Ealing's Little Englishness, respect for authority or sense of community. Its
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: 'Nowhere to Go' (rerelease)

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ Seth Holt's Nowhere to Go (1958), starring George Nader, Maggie Smith and Bernard Lee, is a film which still packs a punch more than fifty years after its initial release. Paul Gregory (Nader) is a crook. Stealing a valuable coin collection from vulnerable widow Harriet Jefferson (Bessie Love), he sells it, puts the money in a safe deposit box and allows himself to be captured. Expecting to get five years maximum, he is shocked when he is jailed for ten. With the help of his friend Victor Sloane (Lee), Paul escapes and goes on the run, in the process meeting socialite Bridget Howard (Smith). Bridget is determined to help Paul, but for how long can they evade the law?

Read more »
See full article at CineVue »

DVD Review - Nowhere to Go (1958)

Nowhere to Go, 1958.

Directed by Seth Holt.

Starring George Nader, Maggie Smith, Bernard Lee, Harry H. Corbett and Lionel Jeffries.

Synopsis:

After breaking out of prison, a thief and conman attempts to flee the country only to end up on the run in the Welsh countryside.

Don’t expect to sympathise with a man like Paul Gregory (George Nader). He’s used up his friends, burned all his bridges and leeched off the goodwill of strangers long enough. Cool indifference and conversational sleight of hand are his professional trademark. He engineers friendships, cultivates sympathy and expects everyone to consider human relations in the same manner.

Paul Gregory is a con man. It’d be more honest to call him a high-functioning sociopath, as the actions that lead him from one disaster to the next all hinge on his inability to truly feel anything for anyone else. He says his friends call him ‘Greg’. What friends?
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Haitian president to sing with Julio Iglesias

Haitian president to sing with Julio Iglesias
Santo Domingo, Dec 28 (Ians/Efe) Haitian President Michel Martelly will get back in touch with his musical roots when he joins Spanish crooner Julio Iglesias on stage for a benefit concert in the Dominican Republic.

"Sweet Micky" Martelly, a music icon in Haiti before he entered politics, will perform two songs with Iglesias, concert promoter George Nader told Dominican media Thursday.

The show is set for Friday in Altos de Chavon and the proceeds will help fund the charitable activities coordinated by the office of Haitian first lady Sophia Martelly.

Nader said Martelly has repeatedly indicated an interest in performing.
See full article at RealBollywood »

Medium Rare serves up a quarter of sex and gore

We’re going old school cult classic for a Monday, so prepare for a new years encounter with murderous witch finders, vampires, lusty warrior women and murderous magicians because Medium rare Entertainment are releasing four icons of cult/classic/horror, from the like of Jess Franco, Vincent Price and Christopher Lee. All are being released in January 2013 in the UK on DVD for the very first time. Here’s the low down on each.... The Bloody Judge (1970/ 18/ 89mins) Directed by Jess Franco, with Christopher Lee, Maria Rohn, Leon Gunn. Christopher Lee swops his cape for a wig and gown to play the notorious Judge Jeffreys, a real-life 17th century witchfinder who showed a ruthless, sadistic justice. His growing obsession with a local wench (Maria Rohm) fuels a jaw-dropping spree of torture, brutality and flesh-ripping perversion. Franco, Lee, Maria Rohm are reunited after The Vengeance of Fu Manchuin this lavishly murderous
See full article at 24FramesPerSecond »

Medium Rare serves up a quartet of sex and gore

We’re going old school cult classic for a Monday, so prepare for a new years encounter with murderous witch finders, vampires, lusty warrior women and murderous magicians because Medium rare Entertainment are releasing four icons of cult/classic/horror, from the like of Jess Franco, Vincent Price and Christopher Lee. All are being released in January 2013 in the UK on DVD for the very first time. Here’s the low down on each.... The Bloody Judge (1970/ 18/ 89mins) Directed by Jess Franco, with Christopher Lee, Maria Rohn, Leon Gunn. Christopher Lee swops his cape for a wig and gown to play the notorious Judge Jeffreys, a real-life 17th century witchfinder who showed a ruthless, sadistic justice. His growing obsession with a local wench (Maria Rohm) fuels a jaw-dropping spree of torture, brutality and flesh-ripping perversion. Franco, Lee, Maria Rohm are reunited after The Vengeance of Fu Manchuin this lavishly murderous
See full article at 24FramesPerSecond »

Career-Killing Hollywood Scandals

Career-Killing Hollywood Scandals
With Thursday's announcement that he'd be putting his Hollywood career "on hold," Arnold Schwarzenegger has left the world to wonder whether there'll ever be another Terminator movie. Certainly plenty of movie stars have weathered scandal in the past, and some have gone on to become even bigger than they were before -- just ask the indestructible Iron Man, Robert Downey Jr. Not everyone's fared so well, though. A look back at Hollywood's history reveals that the town isn't always as forgiving as Schwarzenegger might hope.

The history of career-killing scandal goes at least as far back as the early 1920s, when Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, one of the biggest comedy stars of the day, threw a party where a woman ended up dying of a ruptured stomach. The conjecture was that the 300-pound Arbuckle had raped her and crushed her with his weight. He went through three different trials (and was
See full article at Huffington Post »

See also

Credited With | External Sites