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Ryan Murphy Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (6) | Personal Quotes (7)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 30 November 1965Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Ryan Murphy was born on November 30, 1965 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. He is a writer and producer, known for American Horror Story (2011), Glee (2009) and Nip/Tuck (2003). He has been married to David Miller since July 4, 2012. They have two children.

Spouse (1)

David Miller (4 July 2012 - present) (2 children)

Trivia (6)

While a guest on her radio program "Fresh Air with Terry Gross," Murphy told interviewer Terry Gross that he got his start in Hollywood while still a journalist when he sold a script called "Why Can't I Be Audrey Hepburn?" to Steven Spielberg during the 1990s. Murphy said that Spielberg was interested in the script in part because he had directed Hepburn in her last film, Always (1989). As of the time of the "Fresh Air" interview (May 2009), the script has never been produced.
During high school he was president of a Meryl Streep fan club.
His favorite movies of all time are Network (1976), I Married a Witch (1942), Female Trouble (1974), and Pink Flamingos (1972).
Was in a relationship with Bill Condon during the 1990s.
He's famous for getting in touch directly with the actors he admires and wants to cast, proposing characters and assuring he would tailor them if needed.
Is a fan of filmmaker John Waters.

Personal Quotes (7)

Ah, my famous cologne. It's because when I was growing up, I could only afford that cheap Halston stuff.
Face it, I'm legend. It's happened.
[on Network (1976)]: I just loved it. I remember seeing it as a kid and being absolutely fascinated because it's people doing terrible things and yet you understand why they're doing them. I was very inspired by that when I made Running with Scissors (2006)". It was the same idea.
I think it's only natural to be influenced by the filmmakers and things that you gravitate to when you were younger. I think my first seminal television moment was my grandmother forcing me, sobbing and screaming, to watch 'Dark Shadows'. She would make me sit through it to toughen me, I think. And when I was bad I had to watch 'The Waltons'.
[on what people may not know about him] I'm a softy. There was this turning point for me -- and not in a good way -- when I did "The Glee Project." When I started, I was like, "OK, I'm going to go from being an artist to a Simon Cowell personality." That was my role, and I was really nervous about it. I loved the show, but it was sort of soul-robbing, and I think that people thought that I was that person, the Darth Vader of musical theater. To this day, I look back on episodes, and it kills me that I had to cut those kids. I sort of wish I had done that show and not been in it.
[on what it takes to be a provocateur] I never think I'm creating anything controversial, and I'm always surprised when it is. I'll admit, when I first started and was doing "Nip/Tuck," I was really trying to sort of make a statement about hedonism and narcissism and sexuality, and I spent half my day fighting battles on that show. I had huge standards problems, and I'd have big fights with [FX's] John Landgraf, whom I love now, and Peter Liguori. Now I never fight... I'm less interested in shocking now. Being emotional is more interesting to me. It's funny because I don't get as many standards notes as I used to. I guess what I'm interested in is what has become much more personal to me and thus much more heartfelt and maybe less scandalous. Also, I find that in television, the true taboo is never violence, it's sex, and I'm writing less about sex and more about love at this point.
As a showrunner, you can never be a maybe. When I do movies, there is a lot of "maybe" and "let's investigate that." But for TV, it has to be yes or no. I'm very black and white about what I like or don't like, and I've always been that way. I've always been sort of "I love it" or "I hate it," and I think as a result I've always been a polarizing person. You either love me or you hate me. There's not a lot of "Hmmm."

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